Computer Support in Wadmalaw Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Wadmalaw Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Wadmalaw Island, SC.

IT Support Wadmalaw Island, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Wadmalaw Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Wadmalaw Island, SC
 Computer Services Wadmalaw Island, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Wadmalaw Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Wadmalaw Island, SC
 Cloud Services Wadmalaw Island, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Wadmalaw Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Wadmalaw Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Wadmalaw Island, SC
 Data Security Wadmalaw Island, SC

Additional Computer Services In Wadmalaw Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Kardea Brown On Learning To Love Cooking And Preserving Tradition From Her Mother And Grandmother

The South Carolina native and Food Network star joins us on Biscuits & Jam. About Kardea Brown Kardea Brown is a chef, author, and host of Delicious Miss Brown, one of the most successful shows on the Food Network. She was born in Charleston, South Carolina, and spent much of her childhood on Wadmalaw Island, where she grew up learning Gullah Geechee recipes and traditions from her mother and grandmother. She moved to New Jersey to pursue a career in social work, but when the Food Network saw a video of her ...

The South Carolina native and Food Network star joins us on Biscuits & Jam.

About Kardea Brown

Kardea Brown is a chef, author, and host of Delicious Miss Brown, one of the most successful shows on the Food Network. She was born in Charleston, South Carolina, and spent much of her childhood on Wadmalaw Island, where she grew up learning Gullah Geechee recipes and traditions from her mother and grandmother. She moved to New Jersey to pursue a career in social work, but when the Food Network saw a video of her cooking, everything changed. She quit her job, moved back to Charleston, launched a traveling Gullah supper club, and after a few years of hard work and determination, eventually landed her own TV show. On this episode, we'll chat about some of her favorite recipes, what she loves most about her mother's cooking, and why she wrote her terrific new cookbook, The Way Home: A Celebration of Sea Islands Food and Family.

What Kardea Talks About In This Episode

*Growing up in South Carolina

*Learning to cook from her mother and grandmother

*Getting her start on Food Network

*Leaving the South, and then returning home to Charleston

*Working on her new cookbook, The Way Home: A Celebration of Sea Islands Food

*Her close relationship with her grandmother

*Making her first-ever macaroni and cheese recipe

Quotes from Kardea

"It's so hard to describe something that was so beautiful. My childhood literally was spent barefoot running in sand and being very close to water and eating very fresh vegetation right out of the garden patch, eating okra right out of the okra fields. We have a very large family on Wadmalaw Island, and so I grew up very closely to my cousins who are actually all around the same age. We grew up just hanging out on the island, beach days in the summertime. I just remember all of the beautiful things of just being in the lowcountry. I also remember the muggy day, and being so close to family and enjoying seafood."

Music and food go hand-in-hand in my family, especially my mother and my grandmother. My grandmother, to this day, always has this little radio that she keeps on all day long.

"I know what keeps me going is that this is my purpose. You know, it's the reason why I feel that I'm here because not only am I cooking and doing what I love, I'm also preserving my culture."

"Being Southern is just, it's a sense of pride. I really feel like Southern cuisine, and Southern culture is the fabric of American culture. And being a Southern woman on top of that, it's pretty cool."

About Biscuits & Jam

Southern Living, sits down with celebrity musicians to hear stories of how they grew up, what inspired them, and how they've been shaped by Southern culture. Sid takes us back to some of their most cherished memories and traditions, the family meals they still think about, and their favorite places to eat on the road.Download and listen to this episode of Biscuits & Jam with Kardea Brown on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, or everywhere podcasts are available.

As Ian Wreaks Havoc, Medical Support Departs for Florida, South Carolina

Hurricane Ian’s devastation came into focus Thursday, as images emerged of widespread devastation in Florida communities, including Lee County, which includes Fort Myers and Cape Coral. More than 2.6 million people were without power on Thursday in Florida, and an estimated 1,500 cell sites were down, according to the Federal Communications Commission.The storm made landfall as Category Four hurricane on Wednesday and temporarily weakened as it moved across Florida. However, Ian is expected to strengthen back into hurricane stat...

Hurricane Ian’s devastation came into focus Thursday, as images emerged of widespread devastation in Florida communities, including Lee County, which includes Fort Myers and Cape Coral. More than 2.6 million people were without power on Thursday in Florida, and an estimated 1,500 cell sites were down, according to the Federal Communications Commission.

The storm made landfall as Category Four hurricane on Wednesday and temporarily weakened as it moved across Florida. However, Ian is expected to strengthen back into hurricane status and is tracking toward South Carolina’s coast. Officials in Charleston, South Carolina, have urged residents of the barrier islands and low-lying parts of the coast to evacuate.

Direct Relief has also been in communication with health facilities in South Carolina, and the organization has a number of hurricane modules staged at health centers across the state, including three in Hurricane Ian’s current forecast path: Barrier Islands Free Medical Clinic in Johns Island, Fetter Health Center Network in Charleston, and Sumter Family Health Center Pharmacy in Sumter.

On Thursday, Direct Relief was preparing additional medical support for Fetter Health Center Network, as well as a dozen other shipments for health facilities across Florida. Several shipments departed Wednesday for health centers across the state, and included cold chain shipments of insulin, antibiotics, wound care essentials and more.

The shipments will continue, and add to the 12 hurricane preparedness packs that were staged across Florida before Hurricane Ian made landfall. Each pack contains more than 200 items commonly requested after hurricanes, including chronic disease medications to keep people out of local emergency rooms.

About a third of Lee County, one of the hardest hit by Ian’s impacts, are adults aged 65 years and older. People most vulnerable to storms like Ian are older adults, young children, people with disabilities, and limited access to transportation.

As Hurricane Ian made landfall near the counties of Charlotte and Lee, widespread reductions in population could be detected throughout the area, according to an analysis published Thursday from Crisis Ready, a joint initiative between Direct Relief and Harvard University School of Public Health.

Using anonymized, aggregated data provided by Meta, Direct Relief has insight into how evacuations took place, and when.

“Charlotte and Lee saw population reductions between 65% and 74%. These reductions, however, took place only on the final day prior to landfall. Using the Facebook data alone as a signal, we can detect more than 100,000 people remaining in the heavily flooded coastal counties of Charlotte, Lee, Sarasota, and DeSoto,” according to the report.

On the 28th, no town or municipality registered increasing population numbers, and areas including Cape Coral and Port Charlotte showed declines of 74% or more. Severe power outages, up to 100% of customers, affected Manatee, Collier, Lee, and Sarasota.

Cumulatively those counties contain nearly 17,000 people registered as using power-dependent medical devices. Power outages can be especially harmful for people who rely on power for their health, including people who rely on the use of ventilators or oxygen assistance.

Mural honoring civil rights activists unveiled in Johns Island Wells Fargo Wednesday

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A piece of history is coming to John’s Island as a new mural honoring Lowcountry civil rights activists is set to be unveiled in a Wells Fargo Wednesday.Johns Island has a rich history in the civil rights movement with the “mother of the civil rights movement" Septima Clark born and raised on the island. It’s people like Clark and pioneers like ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A piece of history is coming to John’s Island as a new mural honoring Lowcountry civil rights activists is set to be unveiled in a Wells Fargo Wednesday.

Johns Island has a rich history in the civil rights movement with the “mother of the civil rights movement" Septima Clark born and raised on the island. It’s people like Clark and pioneers like Esau Jenkins who this mural is dedicated to.

The mural is a collection of images of Clark and Jenkins during their time on Johns Island, as well as folk singer Guy Carawan, who wrote "We Shall Overcome" and golf pioneer Henry Picard.

Wells Fargo partnered with local historic societies and libraries to get the images pictured in the mural. The company unveils around 10 to 15 murals a year across the country each year.

While the image resides within the walls of the bank, officials said they want to create a common space for residents with a little touch of history.

“Our purpose is to be a gift back to the community, But also to educate the current clientele and future children of current customers about the importance of their community and its contribution to the civil rights movement, “ Cross Enterprise Initiatives Director for Wells Fargo Beth Curry said.

Clark helped developed literacy and citizenship workshops which played a huge role in the drive for voter’s rights among African Americans in the 1900s. Esau Jenkins is one of the most influential people in the history of the Johns Island. He founded many organizations to improve educational and economic wealth of minority’s in the area during the 1900s.

Guy Carawan wrote “We Shall Overcome," which was a staple song during the civil rights movement and Henry Picard who won the 1938 masters and 1939 PGA Championship, becoming the first golfer from the Lowcountry to do so.

Designers said the impacts these natives have had on Johns Island and the Lowcountry is something which needs to be acknowledged more in the area.

“We really want to make sure that these people are renowned for the current generation, so that they know from whence they come, their community is so important. And it is different than Charleston. I mean, obviously, Charleston, it's a suburb of Charleston, but you want it to be known for its own history and legacy," Curry said.

The unveiling was scheduled for 10 a.m. Wednesday morning. Bill Jenkins, the son of Esau Jenkins, and Nerie Clark, the grandson of Septima Clark, were expected to be in attendance.

Johns Island man provided fake name before jumping from I-26 overpass, report says

NORTH CHARLESTON — A man provided Charleston County deputies with a different name before he took off running across several lanes of a major road and jumping from an overpass.Kelvin Cole, 56, died Oct. 28 after being struck by multiple cars on Interstate 26. Investigators later determined he had active arrest warrants from Charleston County’s Family Court and the S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.Cole, who lived and worked as a welder in Johns Island, was riding in the passenger seat of a car...

NORTH CHARLESTON — A man provided Charleston County deputies with a different name before he took off running across several lanes of a major road and jumping from an overpass.

Kelvin Cole, 56, died Oct. 28 after being struck by multiple cars on Interstate 26. Investigators later determined he had active arrest warrants from Charleston County’s Family Court and the S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

Cole, who lived and worked as a welder in Johns Island, was riding in the passenger seat of a car when a deputy stopped it for alleged traffic violations. The car’s 31-year-old driver was ultimately given a warning.

Attempts to reach Cole’s family Nov. 2 were unsuccessful.

The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office released an incident report Nov. 2, several days after Cole’s death. It provides new details on what preceded the moment he ran from the deputy.

Deputy Tanner Buller was patrolling around 10:30 p.m. near Stall and Mazyck roads in North Charleston when he noticed a white SUV swerve several times from its lane, the report states. The driver also failed to use a turn signal when changing lanes.

Buller, who has worked in law enforcement for five years, had a deputy-in-training with him during the stop. He flipped on his blue lights and the SUV pulled over onto the Ashley Phosphate Road overpass, which sits atop I-26.

Buller spoke with the car’s driver through the passenger-side window. The driver denied he had been drinking, but Buller wrote he could smell marijuana and alcohol coming from the vehicle’s passenger side. The car’s passenger, later identified as Cole, told the deputy his name was Raymond Brown.

Buller had both men get out of their car so he could search them. The driver admitted he’d smoked marijuana earlier in the day, the report states.

When Cole exited the car, Buller saw a beer can near the passenger seat. Buller found Cole’s driver’s license and noticed it did not match the name he’d provided the deputy.

Buller tried to detain Cole “but he pulled away and fled on foot” across Ashley Phosphate Road, the report states. The deputy chased Cole while trying to avoid traffic.

He repeatedly asked Cole to stop but the man “eventually jumped over the guardrail,” the report states. Buller saw Cole’s hands “grabbing the rail for a brief period” before he appeared to let go and fall onto I-26, the report states.

Buller never drew his weapon, said Andrew Knapp, a Sheriff’s Office spokesman. The deputy remains on duty. In addition to conducting its own internal review, the Sheriff’s Office also requested State Law Enforcement Division investigate the incident, Knapp said.

Investigators searched Cole’s name in a federal database and found he had an active warrant with the probation department, as well as three bench warrants with Charleston County’s Family Court.

Cole was the defendant in an ongoing child support case filed in 2016, court records show.

He was placed on a year of probation in February 2020 after pleading guilty in Charleston County to a forgery charge. Cole’s probation sentence would not be terminated until he paid all associated fees, said Anita Dantzler, a department spokeswoman.

Cole owed nearly $2,500 to the department, records show.

A President's Perspective – Sept. 2022

Dear MUSC family,As we once again batten down the hatches and prepare for potential impacts from Hurricane Ian across the state, my thoughts are also with the people of Florida as they withstand a probable Category 4 storm today in addition to the citizens of Puerto Rico, who are continuing to navigate the aftermath of Hurricane Fiona only a few short years after the devastation from Hurricane Maria.In addition to several ways that individuals can ...

Dear MUSC family,

As we once again batten down the hatches and prepare for potential impacts from Hurricane Ian across the state, my thoughts are also with the people of Florida as they withstand a probable Category 4 storm today in addition to the citizens of Puerto Rico, who are continuing to navigate the aftermath of Hurricane Fiona only a few short years after the devastation from Hurricane Maria.

In addition to several ways that individuals can help those suffering from the continued lack of power and reduced access to basic human necessities in Puerto Rico, I wanted you to know that a nationally renowned MUSC Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences team, led by Rosaura Orengo-Aguayo, Ph.D., is offering direct assistance to first responders, community leaders and others who are working around the clock to deliver psychological aid to this storm-weary population. These MUSC colleagues forged ties with Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria and are also working on a long-term telehealth strategy to support the island and its citizens for years to come. I encourage you to read more about their important and impactful work.

As noted in a timely report from our emergency management team, the Atlantic hurricane season will be reaching its peak in late September through October. Be prepared.

If you haven’t already, please become familiar with your area’s plans for storm preparations and operations, including your specific role, as well as ensuring that your personal storm plans with family and loved ones are in order. If you need a refresher on what to be thinking about, I encourage you to take a close look at the South Carolina Hurricane Guide along with MUSC policies and procedures on the University and health system intranets. And as always, please pay close attention to institutional messages in the days and weeks ahead so that you understand how various MUSC locations may or may not be affected.

Yours in service,

David J. Cole, M.D., FACS MUSC President

Innovation in Action

Recently, I spent a few hours visiting four basic science research labs on the Charleston campus with Lori McMahon, Ph.D., MUSC vice president for Research. Each one of these research teams embodies who we are as an enterprise – innovators that drive toward new discovery and impact. MUSC scientists not only push their entire field forward but also enable MUSC Health to deliver cutting-edge care for our patients.

Just some brief sound bites from our day:

Later that evening, I was able to stop by the newly created Advance Discoveries event, where researchers essentially have an opportunity to network with other researchers whom they might not normally encounter, complete with an “open mic” (but no spontaneous karaoke). People were able to address the group and talk briefly about what they are working on, how it connects to MUSC’s purpose and, possibly, find new or unlikely collaborators on topics of choice.

Our research and education missions are what set us apart from others throughout South Carolina and enable us truly to change what’s possible for those we serve. I look forward to spending more time with our research faculty and students as my schedule allows – this day of events certainly got this previously R01-funded surgical scientist re-energized about the amazing experiences that engagement with health care basic science research provides. Without this critical discovery process, at some point, high-quality, innovative health care delivery grinds to a halt.

Giving with Purpose

Earlier this month, we broke ground on the MUSC Health Sea Islands Medical Pavilion, located on Johns Island. This new medical pavilion will provide rapid access to outstanding care for the entire Sea Islands community. It’s another key to our efforts to provide better community access and local care in the greater Tri-county region as well as coastal communities to the north and south of Charleston.

Community support is critical to the short- and long-term viability of this project, and we have been blessed with so many residents and organizations from Seabrook, Kiawah and Johns Islands that have partnered with MUSC in order to make this a reality.

It all began with Kiawah Partners, now South Street Partners, which donated the 6 acres of land upon which the new pavilion is being built. The Town of Kiawah Island also made a gift of $1 million to the effort, signifying that community’s urgent need for nearby medical services. Even part-time residents have joined the effort, including Chris and DeeDee Gibson of Austin, Texas, who recently contributed $2 million to make the pavilion a reality. To date, we have received more than $9.5 million in confirmed gifts toward our goal of $17 million. We are grateful to everyone who has invested in helping us to deliver the best possible care, closest to home

Read the full release.

Recognizing Hispanic Heritage Month

“When public health scientist Hermes Florez, M.D., Ph.D., decided to move from Miami, where Latinos are the majority, to Charleston, where they make up a much smaller percentage of the population, some friends were surprised.

“A lot of my former mentors said, ‘Are you sure that that’s the right move for you? And I said, ‘Why not? It’s a great opportunity.’ There are a lot of misconceptions about the Deep South. I realized that Charleston is quite diverse, and you really can embrace those values.”

Florez, born in Venezuela, is proud to be part of that diversity. “I am very honored to be a champion for Hispanic heritage,” he said, as the nation celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month. Florez brings that same sensibility to his role as chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, where he works to improve the health of people of all backgrounds.

Read more about Hispanic Heritage Month. Charleston Campus Events: https://education.musc.edu/students/ose/diversity

From Kathy

Y’all! I had such a great time earlier this month getting a chance to meet and talk with so many student organization volunteers and new and returning MUSC students from all six colleges. And, I must admit, it’s always fun when we get to bring King of Pops to our students. It’s the little things, right?!

At the annual MUSC Student Activities Fair, there were almost 90 MUSC student groups or organizations represented, plus some local community organizations. There was quite literally something for everyone to get involved in, and I was so excited to see so many students wanting to find new ways to get involved with MUSC and the local community. Dave and I are HUGE proponents of MUSC students taking care of their WHOLE selves while moving through their curriculums, and that means finding extracurricular activities that feed individual development as holistic, passionate and competent future health care professionals, providers, researchers and educators. Hundreds of students participated this year, and we couldn’t have asked for better weather at the event, near the Urban Farm. Although I know that Dave wished he had been able to join us (he was called away for an issue with one of his patients), I know he is looking forward to more opportunities throughout the fall to engage with the MUSC student body.

#ICYMI

Flint Mental Health: Study led by researchers at MUSC found high levels of depression, PTSD and a “large unmet mental health need” following Flint water crisis. Newborn Screening: Brittany Morris was thrilled to welcome her second child into the world. In her eyes, James was perfect. But newborn screening would reveal a hidden issue. Circulating ctDNA: A pilot study will measure circulating tumor DNA in cancer patients with ‘extraordinary’ response to immunotherapy. Innovator Awards: The MUSC Office of Innovation recognizes Christy Huggins and Casey O’Neill, Ph.D., as recipients of the I am an MUSC Innovator awards. Student Mental Health: Students were not alone in managing anxiety, depression, grief during the COVID-19 pandemic, thanks to CAPS services. Managing Cancer Pain: Proper pain management allowed Julie Jablin, who has stage 4 lung cancer, to attend a wedding overseas and enjoy everyday life. Homeless Telehealth: The MUSC Health homeless telehealth clinic in downtown Charleston aims to expand coverage with new grant money. Expanding Screenings: With a grant from The Duke Endowment, a new project at MUSC Hollings Cancer Center has ambitious goals to increase screening rates for five cancers. Bivalent Booster Distribution: MUSC Health Primary Care clinics are distributing the new bivalent booster capable of fighting off Omicron’s subvariants. Breast Cancer Research: A Hollings researcher has received two grants aimed at early career investigators to help advance his breast cancer research. OTC Hearing Aids: Over-the-counter hearing aids are about to hit the market. How much you might save? Who should consider them? How they differ from prescription aids. Endemic Phase?: It’s a time of transition for COVID testing scientists at MUSC as one lab leader says we may be moving toward an endemic phase. Lab Summer: A summer in a research lab might change one Charleston County high schooler’s career path. Pediatric Heart Defects: MUSC researchers have found that certain treatable maternal health conditions can partially explain poorer outcomes in infants of color with heart defects. Cancer Equity Symposium: Consider “place, space and ancestry” when investigating health disparities, said the keynote speaker at a cancer health equity symposium at Hollings. Best Employers: Forbes names MUSC Health one of South Carolina’s best employers, based on surveys about fair pay, safe working conditions and an inclusive culture. Breast Cancer Disparities: Peggi Angel, Ph.D., is looking at whether glycosylation regulation may be influenced by socioeconomic stressors and contribute to breast cancer disparities.

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