Computer Support in Wadmalaw Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Wadmalaw Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Wadmalaw Island, SC.

IT Support Wadmalaw Island, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Wadmalaw Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Wadmalaw Island, SC
 Computer Services Wadmalaw Island, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Wadmalaw Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Wadmalaw Island, SC
 Cloud Services Wadmalaw Island, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Wadmalaw Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Wadmalaw Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Wadmalaw Island, SC
 Data Security Wadmalaw Island, SC

Additional Computer Services In Wadmalaw Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Inaugural ‘Logan Wood Memorial Fishing Tournament’ held to honor late teen

WADMALAW ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Hundreds of people from across the Palmetto State gathered on Wadmalaw Island to celebrate the life of Logan Wood, who tragically lost his life while boating earlier this year.The Wood family remembered their loved one, and his love of fishing, by hosting the first-ever Logan Wood Memorial Fishing Tournament.“We had 240 registrants for the tournament today,” Brooke Wood, Wood’s aunt said, “which is far more than we expected. So, we cannot begin to thank our sponsors a...

WADMALAW ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Hundreds of people from across the Palmetto State gathered on Wadmalaw Island to celebrate the life of Logan Wood, who tragically lost his life while boating earlier this year.

The Wood family remembered their loved one, and his love of fishing, by hosting the first-ever Logan Wood Memorial Fishing Tournament.

“We had 240 registrants for the tournament today,” Brooke Wood, Wood’s aunt said, “which is far more than we expected. So, we cannot begin to thank our sponsors and just everyone that is participating in this; friends and family from near and far.”

Jackson Wood, Logan’s older brother, says fishing was one of his brother’s favorite pastimes.

“I know he’d have a grin on his face seeing everybody out here for him,” Jackson Wood said, “especially on his birthday. He’d love to see everybody out here.”

Wood’s family members say he had a big impact on many people in their community.

“He was just a ray of sunshine to everybody,” Brooke Wood said, “and that’s no exaggeration. That blonde hair was a ray of sunshine for everybody.”

Participants say it was important to take part in the event to express how much he meant to them.

“I’ve known him for a long time,” Brooks Bentz, who participated in Saturday’s tournament, said. “I used to hang out with him when I was young. We used to make stuff and fish and do all that stuff.”

Wood’s family still hopes his impact will be felt by having the Logan Wood Foundation logo as a symbol for boater safety.

“We want it everywhere,” Brooke Wood said. “On the back of cars, on the boats, on your kill switches, on your whistles, everything. Everywhere to be the symbol of safety for this summer, and every summer to come. So, the kids younger than him, the adults older than him will always remember that that’s your priority when you go out, is to come home.”

It was an emotional day for Wood’s family and his older brother told News 2 what he’ll miss most.

“I guess having my fishing partner,” Jackson Wood said. “Having my buddy for life pretty much. My best friend.”

The Wood Family says this will be an annual fishing tournament dedicated to raising awareness for boater safety.

Expansive Johns Island farm could be protected from development with greenbelt money

One of the largest properties on Johns Island could be protected from development in a deal using more than $2.16 million in state and county conservation funding.The five adjoining Ravenswood Farm properties along Chisolm Road cover 631 acres of high ground and nearly 81 acres of wetlands, with extensive frontage on the Stono River.“We are very excited about this,” said Meg O’Halloran, chief advancement officer of the ...

One of the largest properties on Johns Island could be protected from development in a deal using more than $2.16 million in state and county conservation funding.

The five adjoining Ravenswood Farm properties along Chisolm Road cover 631 acres of high ground and nearly 81 acres of wetlands, with extensive frontage on the Stono River.

“We are very excited about this,” said Meg O’Halloran, chief advancement officer of the Lowcountry Land Trust. ‘I think it really anchors the rural character of this part of the island.’ ”

The deal calls for the trust to hold a conservation easement on the land, preventing any significant development. That’s what $1.54 million from Charleston County’s greenbelt program and $625,000 from the State Conservation Bank would pay for under a deal the county and state have approved but has not yet been signed and recorded.

“The Ravenswood project is not just about keeping open spaces open,” said Natalie Olson, the land trust’s Sea Islands program director. “It’s about reducing the risk of losing them and keeping Johns Island rural.”

Under the pending conservation deal no more than five residential structures would be allowed on the land. Conservation easements don’t change the ownership of a property, but restrict how it can be used.

“It’s been in my family for about 235 years,” said Lisa Minshew, one of the co-owners. “That property is like a relative to us.”

She said the conservation easement agreement has “been years in the making” and the details are still being formalized.

“These things are more complicated than some people realize,” Minshew said.

Conservation easement deals look at what a property would be worth if it could be developed — as a residential subdivision, for example — compared to what it would be worth if development were not allowed. For the Ravenswood property, the difference was calculated at nearly $3.4 million.

So, the county and state would pay nearly $2.2 million to permanently restrict the right to develop the land and the property owners would forfeit the rest of the development value according to a Charleston County information sheet on the deal. The $1.2 million in development value the landowners would give up would count as a tax-deductible donation to the Lowcountry Land Trust, resulting in substantial state and federal tax benefits.

That’s how conservation easement deals work. The public gets no access to the land, but taxpayer funds prevent or restrict potential development. Charleston County also buys properties outright through its greenbelt program, often for future public parks.

The Ravenswood deal comes amid rapid residential development on Johns Island, where the population roughly doubled between 2010 and 2020. Charleston County is currently planning more than $200 million in road projects to relieve growth-related traffic there.

“One of the unique things about this property is that it has miles of river frontage and road frontage that are visible to people,” said O’Halloran.

On the opposite side of the Stono River there are dozens of docks. The Ravenswood properties have extensive marsh and river frontage, and multiple small marsh islands but would be limited to three potential docks.

Ravenswood has been a part of the island’s agricultural landscape since the 1700s when John Raven Mathews established it as a plantation, according to south-carolina-plantations.com. His son was governor in 1782-83.

Much more recently Ravenswood was known for being a sod farm prior to the Great Recession, when the housing market meltdown caused demand for sod to greatly decrease. Today’s it’s used for farming, timber and equestrian purposes.

“We raised ostrich out here, that was a thing for a while,” said Minshew. “We did Christmas trees. We had cattle at one point.”

She said future plans could involve planting Long Leaf Pine. Conservation agreements typically allow for ongoing agricultural uses and are focused on restricting development.

New 35-acre preserve coming soon to the Angel Oak

You may already know all about the Angel Oak and how its history spans half a millennium. As Charlestonians, we’re a part of this local landmark’s past, present, and future.We’ll go out on a limb + say you may not know about Angel Oak Preserve — a project featuring a public green space su...

You may already know all about the Angel Oak and how its history spans half a millennium. As Charlestonians, we’re a part of this local landmark’s past, present, and future.

We’ll go out on a limb + say you may not know about Angel Oak Preserve — a project featuring a public green space surrounding Angel Oak Park on Johns Island that’s currently in the planning + public feedback stage.

The project is intended to: Provide a publicly-accessible landscape Conserve the Angel Oak’s integrity Protect the surrounding ecosystem Spread out foot traffic at the park Honor the rural + cultural context of the land

Almost a decade of community outreach has gone into plans for the preserve. The Lowcountry Land Trust, local partners, and the Save the Angel Oak initiative acquired 35 acres surrounding the live oak which will make up the green space.

Lowcountry Land Trust chose Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects to design a comprehensive plan with the help of Robinson Engineering. The planning process, which launches this summer, will include public meetings and surveys. We could see a complete design by early next year, knock on wood.

Public meetings kick off June 9 at 7 p.m. + June 15 at 6:30 p.m. at John’s Island Regional Library. Come prepared to share what you want to see at the preserve and be ready to learn more about Lowcountry Land Trust, the Angel Oak, and how you can help.

Before you make like a tree and leave, sign up for the Angel Oak Preserve newsletter and take the survey.

Editorial: Let’s finish the job of protecting our beloved Angel Oak

The decade-long campaign to protect 35 acres around Charleston’s Angel Oak — land once earmarked for intensive development but now set to become a nature park — ranks as one of our region’s foremost conservation accomplishments. Now it’s time for those who care about this special site to help ensure the land is used in the best way possible to benefit the extraordinary tree, its surrounding environment and all of us.The Lowcountry Land Trust, which owns the acreage, is receiving comments about what people...

The decade-long campaign to protect 35 acres around Charleston’s Angel Oak — land once earmarked for intensive development but now set to become a nature park — ranks as one of our region’s foremost conservation accomplishments. Now it’s time for those who care about this special site to help ensure the land is used in the best way possible to benefit the extraordinary tree, its surrounding environment and all of us.

The Lowcountry Land Trust, which owns the acreage, is receiving comments about what people think should happen in the woods that surround the tree, mostly to the north and east. The area will remain largely natural — a preserve near the middle of rapidly developing Johns Island — but it’s possible that part of it could be used to move visitor parking farther away from the tree’s roots and to create a trail that would help disperse and engage visitors.

Reporter Shamira McCray notes a city inspection found the tree to be in very good health. That’s great news, but as many as 3,000 people a day visit the tree, and all that vehicle and pedestrian traffic undoubtedly could pose a threat if not managed well.

The precise age of the tree is unclear, but there’s a chance it was growing when the first English colonists arrived here. It’s considered one of the largest surviving live oaks, and while the coast has plenty of these trees, relatively few have lower branches that have been allowed to touch the ground and rise back up again. The trust has been researching the history of the tree and the site. Many believe the tree got its nickname because of its graceful, flowing shape, but the name actually stems from the Angel family that once owned it.

Those interested in the remarkable tree should consider attending the trust’s presentation on the site’s history, which will be at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Johns Island Library. There’s an online community survey as well, and residents can drop by a special table at Angel Oak Park from 2-4 p.m. Fridays. Landscape architects Nelson Byrd Woltz of Charlottesville, Va., are handling the planning process, which is expected to wrap up early next year.

We encourage city officials, from the mayor to the park staff, to participate as well and consider how the city should improve its current 5-acre park around the tree. For instance, we understand the need to keep the site’s many visitors from attempting to climb the tree or otherwise damage it, but the signs and yellow plastic chain around its trunk diminish the ambiance, to say the least. Surely, a city as design-conscious as Charleston can improve upon all that.

The community effort to create this preserve — and to stop a development plan that called for shops, offices and apartments — was successful because it brought together a diverse set of residents, business interests and conservationists, an unlikely type of alliance that many now refer to as “the Angel Oak effect.” That breadth of participation was necessary to create the opportunity that we have before us today. And a similar breadth of participation will be necessary to ensure we make the most of it.

The new Angel Oak Preserve also should prove important beyond what it will do for the massive oak or even for Johns Island or the city. Its successful design and implementation would be a high-profile reminder of what can be done in other special places along our coast.

It’s important to conserve rural landscapes that are privately owned and have little to no public access, but this preserve will be highly visible and accessible and can become a prime example of how thoughtful conservation efforts can improve our quality of life.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Wadmalaw residents want DHEC to reverse permit allowing destruction of freshwater wetlands

WADMALAW ISLAND — Residents here are concerned that a planned wetland mitigation bank near the Leadenwah Creek would introduce salt into freshwater habitat for a number of animals, including the threatened American wood stork.The plan by Point Farm, MB LLC is meant to enhance and restore tidal salt marsh on more than 2,000 acres in Charleston County, the company said in a permit application to the state. It plans to remove earthen dikes that have held back ocean water from fresh wetlands.The proposal would change an alrea...

WADMALAW ISLAND — Residents here are concerned that a planned wetland mitigation bank near the Leadenwah Creek would introduce salt into freshwater habitat for a number of animals, including the threatened American wood stork.

The plan by Point Farm, MB LLC is meant to enhance and restore tidal salt marsh on more than 2,000 acres in Charleston County, the company said in a permit application to the state. It plans to remove earthen dikes that have held back ocean water from fresh wetlands.

The proposal would change an already salty pond to tidal salt marsh, turn 10.14 acres of freshwater impoundments brackish and expand 20.60 acres of tidal salt marsh and creeks into currently impounded ponds. Regulators at the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control have approved a permit for the work already.

In a news release, Wadmalaw Island residents John and Marilynn Hill said they are concerned that the only justification for the project’s potential damage appears to be the creation of a “multimillion-dollar windfall profit” from an investor group from Georgia that is creating the mitigation bank.

But the American Mitigation Co., which represents Point Farm, said in a statement that destruction of marsh will not occur, and the project will not adversely affect protected species, including the wood stork.

“From the onset of this project, American Mitigation Company has endeavored to create a unique salt marsh restoration project that is consistent with the conservation goals of the Wadmalaw Island community,” wrote Ross Nelson, the company’s president.

Last week, the South Carolina Environmental Law Project filed a formal request asking DHEC’s board to review the permit and reverse the choice of staff to let the work go forward. The law project is representing the Wadmalaw Island Land Planning Committee, Coastal Conservation League and residents of the sea island.

These groups believe there are issues with the project. First, the creation of the mitigation bank would convert freshwater wetlands, a functioning habitat, to saltwater wetlands without a real need.

Wadmalaw Island already contains very little freshwater. Places on the island with freshwater wetlands have functioned for hundreds of years as important habitats for wading birds and other wildlife, according to Jason Crowley, Coastal Conservation League’s communities and transportation senior program director. These areas were former rice impoundments.

“You’re taking away important habitat on the island for the personal profit of this commercial enterprise,” Crowley said.

Secondly, by only protecting a 50-foot strip of high ground next to the marshy mitigation bank, the property would be at risk of stormwater runoff if development happens close by, Crowley said.

The third concern is that the area is low-lying and susceptible to sea level rise and marsh migration. Crowley said the narrow buffer won’t allow the marsh to move far as sea levels rise.

“That whole bank that people bought credits for to offset their unavoidable impacts somewhere else is at risk of degradation and disappearance in the future because of the issues of sea level rise and uplands development,” Crowley said.

Nelson, in his statement, countered that the mitigation company is proud to have created a project that will result in the restoration of salt marsh and protection of developable lands in the buffer.

“The conservation easement for the bank has been recorded, and the uplands adjacent to the restored marsh are now protected from future development,” Nelson said.

Mitigation banks are private commercial entities that are meant to offset wetland destruction elsewhere. Federal law requires building projects to avoid harming wetlands. And if that isn’t possible, developers must pay to create more wetlands in the same watershed where the old ones were destroyed.

Mitigation banks do this work in advance, and entities can buy credits from them equal to the amount of the lost wetlands.

The Point Farm bank on Wadmalaw has support already from at least one buyer. In November 2020, Charleston County Council voted to purchase mitigation credits from the completed bank, to offset impacts from transportation improvement projects paid for by the county’s 2016 transportation sales tax. Among those projects is the effort to extend Interstate 526 through Johns and James Islands.

In a report, the county Finance Committee touted the proposed mitigation bank as the largest salt marsh restoration project of its kind in South Carolina.

“The bank will improve water quality, lessen the effects of flooding and sea level rise, and provide environmental improvements that offset the impacts of several critical road construction projects,” according the November 2020 committee report.

But John Taylor Jr., vice chair of the Wadmalaw Island Land Planning Committee, said the bank developer’s plan would not only destroy wildlife habitat but also a public resource used for fishing, boating and recreation. Once the bank is created, it is unclear if the public would have access to the area for recreation.

“We urge the board to overturn this permit in order to protect the interests of our community and the interests of all South Carolinians,” Taylor said in a news release.

Permitting for the Point Farm bank began in 2017, and plans to restore and preserve the salt marsh have been reviewed and approved by agencies including the Army Corps of Engineers, National Marine Fisheries Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, DHEC and the state Department of Natural Resources, according to the American Mitigation Co.

DHEC issued its permit on March 2. A DHEC spokeswoman said the agency typically does not comment on pending requests to review permit decisions.

The agency’s board has 60 days to respond to the Law Project’s request to review the mitigation bank permit with DHEC’s board.

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