Computer Support in Wadmalaw Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company’s IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in – we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Wadmalaw Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Wadmalaw Island, SC.

Areas Served

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And when we say “full range of computer support,” we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Wadmalaw Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS’ fully managed computer support in Wadmalaw Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don’t have to build an in-house solution. We’re talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS’ CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses’ growth.

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IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS’ Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We’ll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Wadmalaw Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don’t plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn’t have to be with ITS by your side.

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Cloud Computer Services in Charleston

Cloud Computer Services In Wadmalaw Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS’ Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS’ sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Wadmalaw Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company’s antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best – keeping your customers satisfied.

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Additional Computer Services in Charleston

Additional Computer Services In Wadmalaw Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don’t see a solution to your problem on this page, don’t fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won’t be talking to someone at a call center. You won’t be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don’t see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Wadmalaw Island

Letters: Johns Island development is leading to dangerous potholes, accidents

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designedThis has led to numerous dan...

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.

This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.

Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.

Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designed

This has led to numerous dangerous potholes and vehicle accidents.

There were 69 car fatalities in Charleston County in 2020, a number of which were on Johns Island.

A recent study conducted by Insurify Insights found that Johns Island has the most accident-prone drivers in the United States.

Due to the heavy traffic, it is difficult for emergency vehicles to get to their destination in a safe, timely manner.

Flooding has increased as trees are clear-cut from property and are replaced with asphalt, multiple apartment complexes and homes.

The last thing we need is 47 more acres of tree-filled land to be turned into more multifamily development.

A recent letter to the editor pointed out that the residents of Johns Island have been pleading to the city of Charleston and Charleston County to stop approving more development until we can get the infrastructure in place to support the existing residents.

Our pleas fall on deaf ears.

JEANNE WILLIAMS

Johns Island

Two letters published in the Dec. 12 Post and Courier expressed concerns about two unrelated subjects.

A Wadmalaw Island resident wrote about the relentless development of what was once pristine rural land around the tri-county area. I sympathized because the same song is being sung seemingly everywhere in the Lowcountry.

The second letter talked about the teacher shortage and how it is negatively affecting our quality of life.

That letter listed a number of suggestions to help alleviate the shortage. Several items involved needing more support and awareness from local and state politicians.

I rarely see any explanation or rebuttal to these letters from any of our legislators or council members. I would love to see them explain to the public in writing how they think relentless development is making our lives better.

And please don’t keep saying it’s for a bigger tax base.

Our teachers need increased support. They are an investment in our future and we should start taking note of that.

I encourage council members and legislators to respond to these issues.

Their collective silence to issues voiced by the public makes it seem like they don’t hear our complaints and concerns.

EDDIE COLLINS

Mount Pleasant

It seems that every time Charleston experiences a flood event, many point to climate change.

Land subsidence, another important component to sea level change, is rarely mentioned. Subsidence is largely a natural process, but it has a significant human component.

As development in the Lowcountry has exploded and demand on groundwater has increased, aquifers are not recharging fast enough to prevent land above from sinking.

Another problem is the loss of wetlands that result in more runoff, intensifying soil erosion.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sea level at Charleston Harbor has increased about 13 inches over the past century. But according to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the land around Charleston has sunk about 5 inches over the same period. As development increases, so does the sinking.

We could spend billions of dollars to fight climate change, but for Charleston, it won’t solve the problem.

JOSEPH LEONARD

Charleston

About two months ago, I sent letters of complaint to the headquarters of a large health care organization with a Lowcountry presence.

The letters were addressed to a corporate officer and at least one to the local CEO.

The letters contained documented violations of health care regulations and a potential breach of patient health care information security.

One of the things specifically asked for was an audit of my health care record looking for unauthorized access.

I waited for a reply, an acknowledgement or some action. Nothing.

In the past, such complaints were met with at least a form letter in response and in most cases, some positive action.

Apparently not here, not now in today’s business world.

It seems as if the corporation isn’t interested in what consumers have to say.

I’m a bit frustrated but I won’t be going away anytime soon. I gave the organization a chance to self-correct; perhaps when the complaints start coming from its regulators it might start listening.

I find it ironic that this particular organization talks about being responsive and responsible in its literature. Perhaps the leaders should reacquaint themselves with their own code of ethics.

TIMOTHY C. KIEL

Mount Pleasant

Rural Wadmalaw Island’s grand trees are prized by all, and feared by some

WADMALAW ISLAND — The trees of rural Wadmalaw Island are the pride and joy of its residents. But sometimes they become a menace.The trees have reached down to tear apart the exhaust stacks of Neil Williams’ big truck. Branches scrape off paint and threaten antennae, horns, lights and other equipment.Boats elevated on trailers have lost their radar domes to the trees.The commercial trucking activity on Wadmalaw Island is modest but essential to the community’s economy, which depends on logging, farming a...

WADMALAW ISLAND — The trees of rural Wadmalaw Island are the pride and joy of its residents. But sometimes they become a menace.

The trees have reached down to tear apart the exhaust stacks of Neil Williams’ big truck. Branches scrape off paint and threaten antennae, horns, lights and other equipment.

Boats elevated on trailers have lost their radar domes to the trees.

The commercial trucking activity on Wadmalaw Island is modest but essential to the community’s economy, which depends on logging, farming and some light industry. Goods must be transported to and from key businesses on the island.

But truckers such as Williams loathe rolling their rigs onto Wadmalaw for fear of the trees.

Island resident Lewis Hay has spent more than a year begging the Department of Transportation to come trim the trees along the island’s two main thoroughfares, Maybank Highway and Bears Bluff Road, and on a few significant side roads, but so far, DOT has only addressed perhaps 10 percent of the problem, Hay said.

DOT generally ensures 18 feet of clearance above the road, but island residents think that’s excessive, and they reached a consensus that 14 feet would be enough, Hay said.

Williams would prefer 15 feet to play it safe, and 6 feet clearance from the roadway to the tree line.

Maybe residents should take matters into their own hands and organize chain saw crews to get the work done, someone proposed at a recent community meeting.

But safety and liability issues would prevent that, according to Charleston County sheriff’s deputy Terry Reed Seabrook, an island resident.

Such work must be done by licensed professionals, he said. And DOT really is best suited for the job.

Hay said he first reached out to DOT in September 2020, explaining the urgency of the situation. On July 12 this year, he emailed to DOT a document identifying about 100 trees by location and mile marker but didn’t get any acknowledgement, he said.

On July 26, he sent yet another email. “Let’s not make the only recourse a damage or insurance claim,” he wrote.

Over the course of many months, Hay received various replies, noting that his correspondence had been forwarded to several people. The distribution list was growing. Some at DOT would promise that relief was on the way “this week.”

Meanwhile, the trees kept grasping at the tall vehicles that passed beneath them, as if demanding some souvenir.

Seabrook said the Sheriff’s Office recently acquired a $1.4 million Unified Mobile Command Post, or UMCP, but the emergency vehicle is too tall for Wadmalaw’s roads. No way the sheriff would sent it to the island right now. One determined tree branch could do thousands of dollars worth of damage.

That information disturbed some of the people attending the community meeting.

“So this is a safety issue,” one said.

Hay noted that tax dollars from Wadmalaw Island residents helped pay for that UMCP, yet the islanders can’t benefit from its use.

A couple of weeks ago, a crew of eight DOT trimmers finally came with four trucks and spent a little time cutting smaller branches from trees along Cherry Point Road. They used just one saw.

Better than nothing, Hay said.

This week, Wednesday through Friday, DOT crews are scheduled to do some significant “limb management” along Maybank Highway, DOT officials said. They finally received a green light.

“A district review of the request was required before any work could be done because the request included grand trees, and this was performed in early September,” spokesman Robert Kudelka wrote in an email.

“Grand trees” include live oaks and longleaf pines with a trunk diameter of at least 24 inches at breast-height. DOT agreed to 15 feet of clearance.

“I’m hoping for the best, but all I can say is we’ll wait and see,” Hay said. “Maybank Highway is just the tip of the iceberg.”

The greedy trees on Bears Bluff, Liberia and Cherry Point roads need trimming, too.

Johns Island residents concerned about possible medical village

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Johns Island residents have concerns about a proposed Medical Village on Betsy Kerrison Parkway.Plans were presented at a Charleston County workshop last week, but no formal plans have been submitted to planning yet.The conceptual planned Island Park Place Medical Health and Wellness Village is proposed to be built along Betsy Kerrison Parkway, right across from Rosebank Farms.Plan from DesignWorks show it intends to offer a village-like setting with healthcare and wellness services.The...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Johns Island residents have concerns about a proposed Medical Village on Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

Plans were presented at a Charleston County workshop last week, but no formal plans have been submitted to planning yet.

The conceptual planned Island Park Place Medical Health and Wellness Village is proposed to be built along Betsy Kerrison Parkway, right across from Rosebank Farms.

Plan from DesignWorks show it intends to offer a village-like setting with healthcare and wellness services.

The conceptual plans for the Island Park Place show a 40,000-square-foot Main Medical Facility along with other practices throughout the village like physical therapy, pain management, women’s wellness, chiropractic’s, orthopedics, dentistry, family medicine, cardiology, nutrition, life fitness, pharmacy, health grocery and eateries.

James Stanton lives a few miles from the proposed location. He says he’s in favor of having more medical facilities in this area of Johns Island, but has concerns about the exact site.

“Myself, many of our neighbors, we’re very pro-development and understand where the infrastructure needs to be improved,” Stanton said. “We just want it to be done in a smart way.”

Other people like Rich Thomas, who lives right across from the potential medical village, are worried the medical village would change the character of Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

He feels areas like Freshfield Village or Maybank Highway would be better suited for this type of development.

“Part of the road, about half of it, directly across the road from here is swampy, wetlands,” Thomas said. “So that land would have to be filled in to build a proposed development. Doing that would cause the run-off to go around and back across my property actually if you look at the flow path.”

The workshop meeting last week was the first step for the developer to introduce the planned development.

However, in order for it to ever come, the site would first need to be rezoned to a planned development (PD) through Charleston County Zoning and Planning. The current zoning of the property does not allow the proposed use.

As of now, Charleston County Zoning and Planning Department says they do not have a formal application. Therefore, it is not currently scheduled for any upcoming Planning Commission meetings.

“There’s a feeling around here at times that things just get done in the dead of night,” Thomas said.

He says he hopes there’s a strong public/private conversation if this medical village moves forward in the future.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Santee Cooper to run transmission lines across miles of marshland, Johns Island neighbors worried about wildlife

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Johns Island residents are concerned about proposed transmission lines that Santee Cooper plans to run through nearby marshland.Just across the marsh near the Simmons Creek subdivision is where the utility company is expected to install the power poles.“I honestly have never seen so many birds and wildlife, even dolphins, cutting through here,” said Rodger Willis who lives on Johns Island. “I’ve been very lucky to be out there.”But he is worried about how 5....

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Johns Island residents are concerned about proposed transmission lines that Santee Cooper plans to run through nearby marshland.

Just across the marsh near the Simmons Creek subdivision is where the utility company is expected to install the power poles.

“I honestly have never seen so many birds and wildlife, even dolphins, cutting through here,” said Rodger Willis who lives on Johns Island. “I’ve been very lucky to be out there.”

But he is worried about how 5.17 miles of transmission lines to supply power to Kiawah and Seabrook Island built through the marsh will impact him and the wildlife.

“Santee Cooper is proposing a powerline back up to the existing infrastructure, and right now, the proposed path comes right through the marsh here. They’re putting an 85-foot steel pole right off this island and cut through the tree line,” he said.

To give you a rough idea of the height, a pine tree that stands near the proposed site is around 40-feet. The utility pole would be around twice that high.

Several people in other neighborhoods are also concerned. The lines would run from a location near Rushland Landing Road all the way to near Dogpatch Lane.

Willis said he understands the route has changed during the process.

“There was a better route that was shorter that goes along existing poles, that was an option; but they bounced over to running it along the marsh for close to six miles,” he said. “It seems like an unnecessary waste of gorgeous marshland and has a negative effect.”

He went on to say, “We’re trying to work with them. We said we would like them to bury it. there’s some talk about the increase cost for that. We think it’s well worth it.”

State Senator Sandy Senn has been working with residents on this issue. Senn said she was told the cost estimate to bury the lines is close to $30 million.

On May 7th of this year, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control wrote a letter to say a permit had been issued for the project.

The letter says it will be their final decision unless a written request for final review, plus a $100 fee, is received by the department within 15 days.

Johns Island residents frustrated over Kiawah Island cut-through leading to traffic issues

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Johns Island residents say they are concerned about a shortcut people have been taking on their way to Kiawah Island.Ida Meza has lived in the neighborhood for about three years. “I moved here May 25 of 2018, it’s a wonderful neighborhood. I love it here,” she said.There’s just one problem – people who drive through the neighborhood on their way to Kiawah Island.Residents say Google Maps and Waze are routing people through the Cedar Springs neighborhood &nda...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Johns Island residents say they are concerned about a shortcut people have been taking on their way to Kiawah Island.

Ida Meza has lived in the neighborhood for about three years. “I moved here May 25 of 2018, it’s a wonderful neighborhood. I love it here,” she said.

There’s just one problem – people who drive through the neighborhood on their way to Kiawah Island.

Residents say Google Maps and Waze are routing people through the Cedar Springs neighborhood – taking them from Maybank Highway onto Walter, rather than driving down the road where Maybank runs into Bohicket.

“It’s been an issue since the day I moved in,” said Meza. “People pass you aggressively.”

She is asking the neighborhood not to be used as a cut-through. “All we’re asking as residents of the neighborhood is that it not be a cut through, and not to be for big local trucks to come through there unless they are delivering to us, of course.”

Meza said transfer trucks and sod trucks coming through often get stuck at the round-a-bout. “It causes issues, it causes us not to be able to get out of the neighborhood.”

Residents have tried taking steps to be heard and have passed around a petition calling for more traffic calming measures.

“We understand we don’t qualify for speed humps because it has to be 25 mph or less, but no thru truck signs would be nice. A few more speed limit signs,” said Meza. “Charleston County has been wonderful with doing speed stops; we appreciate that, but the second they leave the behavior returns, of course.”

Residents have also contacted folks at both Google and Waze. “We’re trying to remove us as a cut-thru at this point. We have not heard anything back.”

Meza went on to say, “we want to be able to walk our dogs, get our mail, and pull into our driveway safely without the risk of being harmed by someone who is trying to get to their destination one or two minutes faster.”

She believes neighbors have been working on a fix for this problem since 2006.

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