Computer Support in Summerville SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company’s IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in – we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Summerville, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Summerville, SC.

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And when we say “full range of computer support,” we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Summerville, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS’ fully managed computer support in Summerville, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don’t have to build an in-house solution. We’re talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS’ CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses’ growth.

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IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS’ Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We’ll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Summerville, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don’t plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn’t have to be with ITS by your side.

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Cloud Computer Services in Charleston

Cloud Computer Services In Summerville, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS’ Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS’ sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Summerville, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company’s antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best – keeping your customers satisfied.

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Additional Computer Services in Charleston

Additional Computer Services In Summerville, SC

If you are having IT issues but don’t see a solution to your problem on this page, don’t fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won’t be talking to someone at a call center. You won’t be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don’t see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Summerville

Armadillos have invaded the Lowcountry and are here to stay

SUMMERVILLE — At first glance, Joanna Reese thought a possum was burrowing around her live oak trees in the family’s Summerville backyard.But as Reese approached the ugly rodent, she realized it wasn’t a possum after all.Reese, who moved to the Nexton community only a year ago, was actually very familiar with this armored mammal, having seen plenty of armadillos around her former West Texas home.“I thought I’d seen the last armadillo when I moved away from Lubbock,” Reese said. “...

SUMMERVILLE — At first glance, Joanna Reese thought a possum was burrowing around her live oak trees in the family’s Summerville backyard.

But as Reese approached the ugly rodent, she realized it wasn’t a possum after all.

Reese, who moved to the Nexton community only a year ago, was actually very familiar with this armored mammal, having seen plenty of armadillos around her former West Texas home.

“I thought I’d seen the last armadillo when I moved away from Lubbock,” Reese said. “You’d see armadillos all over the place out there. I don’t know how they found me again all the way from Texas, but they did.”

It certainly won’t be the last armadillo sighting for Reese in the Summerville neighborhood. Armadillos have invaded the Lowcountry, especially in rural parts of Dorchester and Berkeley counties.

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources considers armadillos a nuisance and a health hazard. They can infect humans with leprosy and a parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chagas disease can cause swelling and fever.

“We’ve seen a significant uptick in armadillos in South Carolina over the past five years, especially around Walterboro and Summerville,” said DNR biologist Alicia Farrell. “Armadillos started to migrate east and over the past five years they’ve expanded their range, so having them in this is area is not a huge surprise. It was just a matter of time.”

DNR cautions residents not to touch armadillos with their bare hands and to avoid contact with their blood and fluids.

Before the 1850s, armadillos weren’t found north of the Rio Grande River, but they started expanding their range northward. After showing up in Florida in the late 19th century, they moved up the East Coast toward South Carolina.

The first armadillos began to show up along the lower South Carolina coast in the 1990s. Since then, they have extended their range as far as the Appalachian foothills and are still going. Once thought to be limited by cold weather, the pests have shown to be able to dig in to wait out the winter.

There are approximately 20 known armadillo species in the world, and the main one found in South Carolina is the nine-banded armadillo.

This rapid geographical expansion is attributed to the lack of natural predators to control the population. The shell of this critter is so tough it takes the bite of a cougar or an alligator to penetrate.

“They are here to stay and will only expand their range and become more and more common over the next few years,” Farrell said.

Armadillos are burrowing machines. They plow their way through gardens, lawns and any other loose dirt looking for insects such as beetles, grubs, worms, ants and termites. They burrow 7 or 8 inches in diameter and up to 15 feet in length.

The creatures especially like to burrow near young trees, which is what Reese experienced.

“We have these small oak trees in our backyard and they have burrowed at the base of the trees,” Reese said. “They made these giant holes, and now the root system for the trees have almost been totally destroyed. The trees are starting to dry out. It’s a disaster, and it’s all because of these nasty little beasts.”

Once they make themselves at home, it can take a professional animal trapper and a lot of chemical repellent to discourage them.

“They are starting to become a big problem in the area,” said Bill Lamson-Scribner, a horticulturalist and critter expert affiliated with Possum Landscape and Pest Control Supply.

Managing the food source is the best way to control the armadillo population. Using a systemic grub treatments that contain imidacloprid as an active ingredient can be applied to the lawn area in late spring.

There are traps and repellents that have been effective as well.

“Start with cutting off their food source and then use a trap or repellent,” Lamson-Scribner said.

Farrell said armadillos are not attracted to bait in most traps, so funneling the critters towards a trap might be the best strategy.

“Put a two-by-four board against your house and just heard them toward the trap,” Farrell said.

They have become enough of a pest statewide that DNR regularly fields complaints. It’s open season to hunt them on private land, even at night.

“Homeowners have the right to trap and euthanize the animal,” Farrell said. “They can also hire a professional exterminator or trapper, but what a homeowner can’t do is trap them and then let them loose on someone else’s property.”

Charleston holds on as South Carolina’s largest city but its nearby towns are booming

Charleston did it again.After officially eclipsing Columbia as South Carolina’s largest city back in 2017, the Holy City will get to hold onto those bragging rights.The population in the city of Charleston has now surpassed 150,000, according to 2020 estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census.More precisely, Charleston saw its population swell to 150,227 in the last decade, up just over 25% from 120,083 residents in 2010.The capital city of ...

Charleston did it again.

After officially eclipsing Columbia as South Carolina’s largest city back in 2017, the Holy City will get to hold onto those bragging rights.

The population in the city of Charleston has now surpassed 150,000, according to 2020 estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census.

More precisely, Charleston saw its population swell to 150,227 in the last decade, up just over 25% from 120,083 residents in 2010.

The capital city of Columbia came in at No. 2 overall with a population of 136,632, followed by North Charleston, which is now home to 114,852 residents as of April 1, 2020.

But a closer look at the numbers show Charleston isn’t the only place in the Lowcountry on the move in the Palmetto State, when it comes to size and growth rate.

And Charleston residents don’t have to look far to find it.

Five of South Carolina’s ten largest places, which include both cities and towns, can be found in the Charleston metro area, according to new census data.

Those five Charleston-area standouts, by population are: Charleston, North Charleston, Mount Pleasant, Summerville and Goose Creek.

In fact, one of the biggest places in the state isn’t even a city. It’s a town.

The Town of Mount Pleasant, located just east of peninsular Charleston over the iconic Arthur Ravenel Bridge, has seen its population grow by nearly 33% in the last decade, data show. It is now the fourth-largest place in South Carolina, based on population estimates, right behind North Charleston.

The suburb east of the Cooper River is now home to 90,081 people, up from 67,843 in 2010.

The same can be said for the town of Summerville in nearby Berkeley County, which has seen its population rates grow by about 17% in the last decade, census reports show.

Though it may not have landed in the top 10 for population size in South Carolina, the Town of Moncks Corner, also in Berkeley County, experienced dramatic growth since 2010.

The latest 2020 census totals show the small town has nearly doubled in size.

In 2010, Moncks Corner had 7,885 residents. It now has 13,297.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Richland County’s population grew 8.2% over the past 10 years, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The 2020 Census counted 416,147 residents in the county. The headcount in 2010 was 384,504.

Richland has the second largest population in the state, second only to Greenville County, which has 525,534 residents.

The city of Columbia saw a modest 5.7% population increase. But with a headcount of 136,632, the state capital still has more residents than any other place in the county.

Blythewood saw the most significant growth at 134.6%. The population is now 4,772.

Though the county grew overall, the populations of Eastover, Gadsden and Hopkins in the Lower Richland area shrunk. The number of residents there decreased by 24.5%, 20.3% and 12.3% respectively.

Here’s a look at the population of towns and cities in Richland County and the percentage change from 2010.

Richland County, 416,147, 8.2%

Arcadia Lakes, 865, 0.5%

Blythewood 4772, 134%

Columbia 136,632, 5.7%

Dentsville 14431, 2.6%

Eastover 614, -24.5%

Forest Acres 1,0617, 2.5%

Gadsden 1,301, -20.3%

Hopkins 2514, -12.3%

Lake Murray of Richland 8110, 47.9%

Columbia’s population has grown in the last decade, but not as quickly as other large cities in South Carolina.

The federal government on Thursday released initial 2020 U.S. Census numbers, and they showed Columbia with a population of 136,632. That’s a 5.7% gain over 2010, when the capital city’s population was 129,272

Columbia was once South Carolina’s most populous city, but that title now resides with Charleston. The 2020 census data indicates 150,227 people live in Charleston. That’s up 25.1% from 2010.

Meanwhile, the city of Greenville’s population hit 70,720, per the census, up from 58,409 in 2010. That was a 21% hike.

Closer to Columbia, the town of Lexington saw solid growth in the last 10 years. The in-town population went from 17,870 to 23,568. That was a gain of nearly 32%.

Richland County saw its population go from 384,504 to 416,147 from 2010 to 2020. That was an 8.2% increase. Meanwhile, over in neighboring Lexington County, the population swelled from 262,391 to 293,991 in the last decade, good for a 12% gain.

Overall, the state of South Carolina saw its population grow steadily in the past decade, from 4.6 million to 5.1 million, an increase of about 10.67%.

Columbia, to be sure, has seen new development in the last decade. There have been a host of new private student housing units built across the city, particularly in the vicinity of the University of South Carolina.

There has been progress at the BullStreet District, where the city and Greenville’s Hughes Development are working to overhaul the massive 181-acre former state mental hospital site. There are now occupied townhomes and a senior living facility on the site, and the historic Babcock Building is being renovated into hundreds of new apartments.

And the Main Street District downtown has seen growth. According to an analysis from downtown advocacy group City Center Partnership, there were 550 people living in the Main Street District in 2011. By 2019, that number had tripled to more than 1,700. That came as Main Street north of the State House was revitalized with bars, restaurants, theaters and hotels.

But Columbia’s relatively flat overall growth has been a topic of discussion with city leaders for a while. Some have pointed to the tax structure in Richland County as a possible issue.

Last year the city commissioned a sprawling 81-page property tax analysis, at the cost of $25,000, that said the Columbia area had the highest property taxes in the state among large metros.

That study was done by Rebecca Gunnlaugsson, principal at Acuitas Economics and former chief economist with the state Department of Commerce. The study suggested that, in order for Columbia to become more competitive with places like Greenville and Charleston, the city, Richland County and Richland County’s school districts need to work collaboratively to reduce commercial property tax rates, lobby the state government to overhaul part of its tax code, and combine city and county services that are overlapping, among other steps.

Columbia City Council has put together a committee to analyze the tax study.

Columbia also has seen in the last decade the closure of two massive in-city public housing apartment complexes — Gonzales Gardens and Allen Benedict Court — each of which once housed hundreds of residents. City officials have noted in the past that many of those residents were eventually relocated to new housing outside of city limits.

Elsewhere in the state, Rock Hill continues to grow. It went from 66,154 residents in 2010 to 74,372 in 2020. That’s a 12.4% bump.

And in Myrtle Beach, long a top SC tourist destination, the number of residents calling it home is on the rise. Population rose there from 27,109 to 35,682 in the last decade. That’s a bold 31.6% increase.

First round of Sephora shops in Kohl’s open; here’s where

The Sephora-Kohl’s partnership has officially launched.The first batch of Sephora-branded shops at Kohl’s have opened, with locations in Sterling Heights, Mich.; Ramsey, New Jersey; Brookfield, Wisconsin; and Woodbury, Minnesota. Another 73 shop-in-shops will open on Aug. 20 (locations at end of article), with a total of 200 open this fall and at least 850 by 2023. Online sales launched Aug.1.In December, the two retailers announced a long-term ...

The Sephora-Kohl’s partnership has officially launched.

The first batch of Sephora-branded shops at Kohl’s have opened, with locations in Sterling Heights, Mich.; Ramsey, New Jersey; Brookfield, Wisconsin; and Woodbury, Minnesota. Another 73 shop-in-shops will open on Aug. 20 (locations at end of article), with a total of 200 open this fall and at least 850 by 2023. Online sales launched Aug.1.

In December, the two retailers announced a long-term partnership for the beauty giant to open hundreds of branded shops inside Kohl’s stores. The move came less than a month after Target Corp. announced an in-store partnership with Ulta Beauty, which is set to begin opening in-store shops at Target in August.

[Read More: First Ulta Beauty in-store shops at Target to open in August — here’s where]

Sephora at Kohl’s replaces the department store retailer\'s previous beauty department. The 2,500 sq. ft. shops have a prominent upfront position and feature 125 prestige beauty brands across makeup, skin, hair and fragrance, with about 8,500 products in all.

The shops are set apart from the rest of the store by signature Sephora elements such as the brand\'s iconic gondolas, signage and black-and-white color pattern. They are staffed by Sephora-trained advisors, who send ready to give personalized beauty consultations and assistance.

Here is a list of the Sephora shops at Kohl’s scheduled to open on August 20.

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Summerville-Area Unemployment Rate Worsened In June: Feds

SUMMERVILLE, SC — The U.S. pandemic economic recovery moved full steam ahead in July as employers added nearly 1 million jobs.About 943,000 non-farm jobs were added in July and unemployment dropped 0.5 percentage points to 5.4 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. May and June employment figures were also revised upward, with both months now combined for 1.55 million additional jobs.The latest available local unemployment figures are for June, which actually showed an increase over May in the Summervi...

SUMMERVILLE, SC — The U.S. pandemic economic recovery moved full steam ahead in July as employers added nearly 1 million jobs.

About 943,000 non-farm jobs were added in July and unemployment dropped 0.5 percentage points to 5.4 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. May and June employment figures were also revised upward, with both months now combined for 1.55 million additional jobs.

The latest available local unemployment figures are for June, which actually showed an increase over May in the Summerville area, according to BLS. Still, the unemployment rate is much lower than during the worst of the pandemic; and when July figures become available, they are expected to show further improvement in most parts of the country.

The Berkeley County unemployment rate was 4.1 in June, up from 3.5 percent in May. That reflected some improvement from June 2020, when the unemployment rate stood at 7.2 percent.

The June unemployment rate in Berkeley County was lower than the South Carolina rate of 4.5 percent, according to the latest local figures from the BLS.

Nationally, total non-farm payroll employment is up 16.7 million positions since April 2020 but down 5.7 million (3.7 percent) from pre-pandemic levels.

Average hourly earnings increased by 11 cents to $30.54, marking four straight months of increases.

The leisure and hospitality industries once again had a stellar rebound in employment, with about 380,000 jobs added in July. Still, employment in the sector is down 10.3 percent from pre-pandemic levels.

Editor\'s note: This post was automatically generated using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. Please report any errors or other feedback to content@patch.com.

SUMMERVILLE, SC — The U.S. pandemic economic recovery moved full steam ahead in July as employers added nearly 1 million jobs.

About 943,000 non-farm jobs were added in July and unemployment dropped 0.5 percentage points to 5.4 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. May and June employment figures were also revised upward, with both months now combined for 1.55 million additional jobs.

The latest available local unemployment figures are for June, which actually showed an increase over May in the Summerville area, according to BLS. Still, the unemployment rate is much lower than during the worst of the pandemic; and when July figures become available, they are expected to show further improvement in most parts of the country.

The Berkeley County unemployment rate was 4.1 in June, up from 3.5 percent in May. That reflected some improvement from June 2020, when the unemployment rate stood at 7.2 percent.

The June unemployment rate in Berkeley County was lower than the South Carolina rate of 4.5 percent, according to the latest local figures from the BLS.

Nationally, total non-farm payroll employment is up 16.7 million positions since April 2020 but down 5.7 million (3.7 percent) from pre-pandemic levels.

Average hourly earnings increased by 11 cents to $30.54, marking four straight months of increases.

The leisure and hospitality industries once again had a stellar rebound in employment, with about 380,000 jobs added in July. Still, employment in the sector is down 10.3 percent from pre-pandemic levels.

Editor\'s note: This post was automatically generated using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. Please report any errors or other feedback to .

SIUE Athletes On Commissioner\'s Honor Roll

BRENTWOOD, Tenn. – The Ohio Valley Conference has announced the recipients of the Commissioner\'s Honor Roll, recognizing a record 1,711 student-athletes, which includes 116 SIUE student-athletes.To be listed, student-athletes must have achieved at least a 3.25 grade point average, have been eligible and on the team throughout the competitive season in their chosen NCAA-sponsored sport(s) and a used a season of competition.The list of SIUE recipients follow by sport:Baseball (15): Tyler Bastunas...

BRENTWOOD, Tenn. – The Ohio Valley Conference has announced the recipients of the Commissioner\'s Honor Roll, recognizing a record 1,711 student-athletes, which includes 116 SIUE student-athletes.

To be listed, student-athletes must have achieved at least a 3.25 grade point average, have been eligible and on the team throughout the competitive season in their chosen NCAA-sponsored sport(s) and a used a season of competition.

The list of SIUE recipients follow by sport:

Baseball (15): Tyler Bastunas (Lake St. Louis), Jake Bockenstedt (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), Braydon Bone (Effingham, Illinois), Griffin Bruder (Parker, Colorado), Dylan Burris (Edwardsville), Ethan Copeland (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), Raul Elguezabol (St. Louis, Missouri), Brant Glidewell (Goreville, Illinois), Matthew Klein (Highlands Ranch, Colorado), Brennan Orf (Wildwood, Missouri), Avery Owusu-Asiedu (Waukesha, Wisconsin), Nic Roes (Kent, Washington), John Stallcup (St. Louis), Ryan Swanson (Eden Prairie, Minnesota), Quinn Waterhouse (Bondurant, Iowa)

Men\'s basketball (6): Jackson Best (Edwardsville), Carlos Curtis (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), Elochukwu Eze (Enugu, Nigeria), Michael Matas (Oakville, Ontario), Desmond Polk (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), Ray\'Sean Taylor (Collinsville)

Women\'s basketball (6): Mikala Hall (Danville, Illinois), Mikia Keith (Indianapolis, Indiana), Mikayla Kinnard (Louisville, Kentucky), Sara Majorosova (Kosice, Slovakia), Allie Troeckler (Bethalto, Illinois), Zaria Whitlock (St. Paul, Minnesota)

Men\'s Cross Country (3): Spencer Hielkema* (Rockton, Illinois), Zach Walters* (Edwardsville), Cameron Woodard* (Philo, Illinois)Women\'s Cross Country (5): Kassidy Dexheimer* (Washington, Illinois), Alexis Edgar* (St. Charles, Missouri), Emily Ellis* (Minooka, Illinois), Caroline Gwaltney* (Williamsville, Illinois), Kaitlyn Walker* (O\'Fallon, Illinois)

Men\'s Golf (9): TJ Baker (Rockford, Illinois), Peder Lehmann Brunnsjö (Hoiivikem, Sweden), Zak Butt (Summerville, S.C.), Tanner Collins (Kansas City, Missouri), Luke Ludwig (Effingham, Illinois), Presley Mackelburg (Reno, Nevada), Connor Neighbors (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), Anthony Ruthey (Port Byron, Illinois), Bensen Tyrrell (Edwardsville, Illinois)

Women\'s soccer (18): Megan Danielson (Lake Orion, Michigan), Matea Diekema (Grand Rapids, Michigan), Myah Diekema (Grand Rapids, Michigan), Taylor Dolt (Lawson, Missouri), Emma Dutko (Granite City, Illinois), Emma Ehrsam (Joliet, Illinios), Andrea Frerker (Collinsville, Illinois), Lydia Harris (Chesterfield, Missouri), Sarah Hibbeler (Kansas City, Missouri), Angel Ikeda (St. Charles, Missouri), Megan Keeven (St. Charles, Missouri), Kayla Klipsch (St. Louis, Missouri), MacKenzie Litzsinger (Fenton, Missouri), Sarah Magnoni (Des Plaines, Illinois), Lily Schnieders (Fenton, Missouri), Taylor Spiller (Cincinnati, Ohio), Jay Viola (St. Peters, Missouri), Courtney Vollmer (Belleville, Illinois)

Softball (16): Micah Arps (St. Louis, Missouri), Sydney Baalman (Hardin, Illinois), Ava Bieneman (Genesco, Illinois), Grace Bretveld (Bloomington, Indiana), Alana Cobb-Adams (Kapolei, Hawaii), Bailley Concatto (Cumming, Georgia), Cadee Cooper (Orangevale, California), Jenna Herron (West Frankfort, Illinois), Emily Ingles (Scottsdale, Arizona), Lexi King (Goreville, Illinois), Kylie Lane (Cape Girardeau, Missouri), Kennedy Lehn (Kewaskum, Wisconsin), Grace Lueke (McLeansboro, Illinois), Zoe Schafer (Noblesville, Indiana), Amber Storer (Lincoln, Nebraska), Bianca Vozenilek (Plainfield, Illinois)

Women\'s tennis (8): Callaghan Adams (Edwardsville), Nicole Gomez (Cartagena, Colombia), Jill Lambrechts (Beerse, Belgium), Fabiola Perez (Sunny Isles, Florida), Vanessa Reinicke (Berlin, Germany), Jordan Schifano (Cedarburg, Wisconsin), Caitlyn Sporing (Blue Springs, Missouri), Melissa Vizcardo (The Woodlands, Texas)

Men\'s track and field (11): John Barnes (Hollowayville, Illinois), Brandon Bretz (Mahomet, Illinois), Daniel Card (Plainview, Illinois), Spencer Hielkema* (Rockton, Illinois), Cole Knapp (Wausau, Wisconsin), Austin Lynch (Roselle, Illinois), Conor McCarthy (Lockport, Illinois), Ethan Poston (Metamora, Illinois), Landon Skelly (Chatham, Illinois), Zach Walters* (Edwardsville), Cameron Woodard* (Philo, Illinois)

Women\'s track and field (15): Keri Burmester (Red Bud, Illinois), Kailah Carter (Bloomington, Illinois), Kassidy Dexheimer* (Washington, Illinois), Alexis Edgar* (St. Charles, Missouri), Emily Ellis* (Minooka, Illinois), Alexis Fischer (Jefferson City, Illinois), Hayley Goebel (Palos Heights, Illinois), Aly Goff (Springfield, Illinois), Caroline Gwaltney* (Williamsville, Illinois), Catherine Jakich (Granite City, Illinois), Izzy Kennedy (Plainfield, Illinois), Jamirah Meeks (St. Louis, Missouri), Paris Somerville (Chicago), Savannah Sullivan (Edwards, Illinois), Kaitlyn Walker* (O\'Fallon, Illinois)

Volleyball (13): Sarah Armendariz (Fresno, California), Hannah Bagley (Superior, Colorado), Alyse Drifka (Richfield, Wisconsin), Annie Ellis (Edwardsville), Hope Everett (Norris City, Illinois), Grace Hurst (McCordsville, Indiana), Nicole Kijowski (Channahon, Illinois), Jordyn Klein (St. Charles, Missouri), Rachel McDonald (Cold Spring, Kentucky), Jenna Taphorn (Pekin, Illinois), Julia Treichel (Brookfield, Wisconsin), Jessica Vineyard (Preston, Idaho), Gabby Wimes (Kansas City, Missouri)

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