Computer Support in Sullivan's Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Sullivan's Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Sullivan's Island, SC.

IT Support Sullivan's Island, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Sullivan's Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Sullivan's Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Sullivan's Island, SC
 Computer Services Sullivan's Island, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Sullivan's Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Sullivan's Island, SC
 Cloud Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Sullivan's Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Sullivan's Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Sullivan's Island, SC
 Data Security Sullivan's Island, SC

Additional Computer Services In Sullivan's Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan’s Island restaurant opens with fresh fish, ’1970s-inspired’ beachside aesthetic

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood an...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood and beach-themed cocktails Tuesday through Sunday.

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic. Her goal was to give the space a fresh look with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu.

A place that feels new and nostalgic all at once.

“That’s been the biggest compliment that we have received is (people saying) ‘Oh it feels like it’s been here forever,’ ” Kate Towill said.

Leading the kitchen as executive chef is Davis Hood, who grew up on Isle of Palms with his brother Nathan, culinary director of Basic Projects. Hood, who recalls walking by the Middle Street building on his way to Sullivan’s Island Elementary School, is focusing on sustainability at the new Sullivan’s Island restaurant.

Local purveyors like Abundant Seafood, Tarvin Seafood, Lowcountry Oyster Co., Vertical Roots and Peculiar Pig Farm dot the Sullivan’s Fish Camp menu.

“It’s not your average fish camp in my eyes,” Hood said. “The whole concept of snout to tail cooking, we’re trying to bring that vibe but with fish. Understanding that the ocean is such an important part of our lives and not trying to have any waste.”

If there is one dish that epitomizes this approach, it’s the Sullivan’s Island Gumbo that features Tarvin Seafood shrimp, clams, okra, lobster broth, dayboat fish and Anson Mills Charleston Gold Rice. The West African style gumbo’s gluten-free base is made using chicken bones, lobster shells, shrimp shells, fennel, celery, palm oil and Bradford Family Farm okra, which replaces a roux as the stew’s thickening agent.

Ben Towill said the gumbo, along with the pan-roasted fish of the day and tempura nori tuna with furikake aioli have been some of the restaurant’s top sellers in its first weeks of service.

“We feel like the menu’s been received really well,” Ben Towill said. “Guests and everyone have felt really comfortable which has been a big bonus.”

Fresh seafood isn’t the only element that gives Sullivan’s Fish Camp that desired beachside feel. Self-described “fruity” cocktails like the tequila-based Sumter’s Watch, rum-based Sullivan Swizzle and the frozen paloma will immediately put patrons on island time.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is open for dinner from 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and lunch is currently served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The restaurant plans to eventually serve lunch and dinner daily.

For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com or call 843-883-2100.

'Do not rezone that golf course'; citizens say facility needed; change may also threaten airport

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision."I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."...

Several individuals appeared before Orangeburg County Council requesting a halt to the rezoning of the Holly Hill Golf Club property that would allow the development of a single-family subdivision.

"I beg you please do the right thing and do not rezone that golf course," Co-chair of Planning and Zoning for Holly Hill Justin VanBogart told Orangeburg County Council during its regularly scheduled June 6 meeting. "It is in the public interest to keep one of the very few recreational things we have in this town."

Council was scheduled to give second reading to rezone the golf club property from forest agriculture to residential general.

American Star Development SC, LLC of Sullivan's Island has requested the two parcels making up the Holly Hill Golf Club at 9159 Old State Road be rezoned.

The parcels are a combined 93.59 acres. The property is about one mile southeast of the Town of Holly Hill.

ASC has said the company has no specific plans for the property at the moment. It is exploring zoning opportunities to better determine future development plans.

County planning officials say the owner has expressed his intentions to close the golf course.

Several attempts to reach the owner of the property, as listed on the rezoning application, have been unsuccessful.

County attorney D'Anne Haydel said the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission notified the county it has two objections with rezoning the property, specially due to safety and noise concerns.

Haydel noted the SCAC is a governmental entity and needs a hearing.

"There is a statute that indicates we need to get back with the Aeronautics Commission within 30 days with a line-by-line response to why it is safe and why it won't be noisy," Haydel said.

In light of the new information, council unanimously voted to table the matter and to send it back to the County Planning Commission for further study on the SCAC concerns.

Prior to the council's vote, VanBogart noted with the number of housing developments planned -- the town is going to grow from 700 homes to 3,000 homes in the next two years -- there will be a need to have recreational opportunities for residents coming into the area.

"We want to keep our golf course," VanBogart said. "It is very much integral to our town."

VanBogart said while the town owned the golf course for years, it has been sold to a private developer who has "plans to tear it (golf course) down and make it homes."

"I am all about private property rights," VanBogart said, but noted there has not been full disclosure from the property's ownership about intentions for the property. "We were all caught completely blindsided."

John Hill, speaking on behalf of his son, John Paul, who keeps a plane at the airport, says the airport is a "gem."

"I think there is hardly any left in South Carolina that are a grass strip and private," Hill said. "This is going back to the past in America when pilots flew out of grass strips."

Hill said the airport is a great educational tool for young generations and has flight opportunities for school-aged children as well as instruction on airplane mechanics as part of the national Experimental Aircraft Association.

"It is a page of history that is going to disappear," Hill said. "I think it is a unique distinction. That airport can lead to so many things."

Robert Gootman also expressed his support of the Holly Hill Airport.

"There are too many airports that close and Holly Hill has a very unique asset in that airport and it will grow along with the community," Gootman said, noting the airport can be used in cases of emergency, training of pilots and recreational uses. "If that golf course turns into a housing development, that airport will be shut down. It will be too dangerous to land airplanes there because you will have houses right there in front of the flight path."

Ken Mackey also has an airplane at the Holly Hill airport.

"It will close the airport," Mackey said. "You can't have airplanes coming 200 feet over the house."

Mackey said subdivisions alongside the airport are possible.

He has contacted the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association national group, which is putting a package together to possibly turn the airport into an air park where houses alongside the airport have hangars.

"There are no hangars available from Holly Hill to the coast to hangar your aircraft," Mackey said. "There is demand there for this type of development ... and keep the asset as an airport."

Originally published on thetandd.com, part of the TownNews Content Exchange.

Sullivan’s Island restaurant’s retention rate stands out amid staffing crisis

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Obstinate Daughter bar manager Frank Arevalo has always been a fan of celebrating career milestones.Since joining the island standby eight years ago, he has helped make this ethos a part of everyday life for the restaurant’s employees.When a member of Obstinate Daughter’s team celebrates a one-, two- or six-year anniversary, Arevalo honors their achievement on social media.There have b...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Obstinate Daughter bar manager Frank Arevalo has always been a fan of celebrating career milestones.

Since joining the island standby eight years ago, he has helped make this ethos a part of everyday life for the restaurant’s employees.

When a member of Obstinate Daughter’s team celebrates a one-, two- or six-year anniversary, Arevalo honors their achievement on social media.

There have been a lot of posts in the last year.

Dylan Elliott (two years), Samuel Elvington (three years), Shaun Jefferson (two years), Zoe Alessandra De Luca-Parker (two years), Andrea Deslauriers (three years) and Whitney Reed Mallett (five years) have all celebrated work anniversaries in the past seven months. Many more have already surpassed one year at Obstinate Daughter.

Arevalo started the tradition years ago when a server named Tifyane Tipton was nearing her five-year anniversary. The 29-year food and beverage industry veteran posted about Tipton’s milestone on social media. The rest is history.

“Before we started posting them on Instagram, we would have a calendar with milestones and birthdays posted up in the restaurant as a reminder of those special occasions,” Arevalo said. “Our No. 1 asset is our people. Celebrating milestones creates a culture of being valued.”

This culture starts at the top with owner Doug Godley, who provides employees with paid vacation and match a portion of their 401(k), among other benefits. Both Godley and Obstinate Daughter executive chef Jacques Larson say they hope to create the best possible work environment for all employees.

“Chefs and anyone in the industry, it’s expected that you work at least six days for at least 12 hours long. No other industry demands that you put in those kinds of hours,” Larson said. “People that do that don’t have employees holding signs.”

In May, bartender Lauren Drees will hold up a sign that reads “five years,” an anniversary she credits to the restaurant’s customers, commitment to the environment and her coworkers. The Pittsburgh native said she plans to stay put at Obstinate Daughter for a long time.

“There’s a really good rapport between front of the house and back of the house,” Drees said. “It just makes everything smoother when you feel like you can ask questions.”

Obstinate Daughter chef de cuisine Will D’Erasmo bought into the company culture after first meeting Godley and Larson at Wild Olive, their Johns Island restaurant that opened in 2009. There, D’Erasmo worked as a line cook for two years before joining Obstinate Daughter when it opened in 2014.

“At this point it’s kind of like my home because I’ve put so much time and energy into it. Doug is an extremely generous boss. He provides us with new equipment if we ask for it and things like that,” D’Erasmo said. “I enjoy the food and I like working with Jacques.”

Employment in South Carolina’s leisure and hospitality sector grew 2.2 percent from March to April, but Charleston area restaurateurs are still struggling with a staffing crisis that existed even before the COVID-19 pandemic. While Obstinate Daughter has a stable staff, there are days when the kitchen crew is short a member or two.

During those shifts, everyone chips in.

“The sheer volume that we’re doing, we’re blowing through food products,” D’Erasmo said. “It gets stressful and how to alleviate some of that stress is something we’re always thinking about.”

D’Erasmo motivates the back of the house by allowing chefs to move around the kitchen. “Tough love” was the norm early on in his career, but nowadays, he prefers a different mantra: A compliment can go a long way.

The opportunity to learn and earn more responsibilities in the kitchen has benefited executive sous chef Carlos Paredes, who joined Obstinate Daughter six years ago. On most nights, Paredes is in charge of coming up with the restaurant’s daily specials.

“The restaurant works completely different. If you’re working the line, you have to have a different set of skills,” Paredes said. “Nobody’s bored doing one station every time.”

Obstinate Daughter is a high-volume operation, so chefs who tire of the nighttime hours can join the morning prep team. The restaurant has been the ultimate training ground for Paredes, who is nearing the end of his tenure at Obstinate Daughter as he plans for the opening of his own restaurant in his home country of Peru.

Opening a restaurant has always been Paredes’ dream, but he was tempted by the thought of staying at Obstinate Daughter for as long as D’Erasmo and Larson would have him. As it stands, the chef will stay until the new restaurant is closer to its opening date.

“I think it’s definitely going to crush me,” Paredes said of leaving Obstinate Daughter. “I fell in love with the place. It actually make me find what I really want to be doing.”

Obstinate Daughter, located at 2063 Middle St., is open daily for lunch and dinner. For more information, visit theobstinatedaughter.com.

New legislation could increase enforcement of state ethics fines

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.That’s about the same as when ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.

It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.

That’s about the same as when Live 5 Investigates reported on the debtors three years ago.

Ethics Commission Debtor’s list continues to grow

The latest to be added from the Lowcountry area are Angela McClary-Rush, a board member for Williamsburg Council Schools, Chris Lovelace, a former Colleton County Sheriff candidate and Timothy Reese, a council member on Sullivan’s Island.

Many remain on that list months and years after being added because getting them to pay up, doesn’t always pay off for the South Carolina Ethics Commission.

That’s because the state agency lacks the enforcement it needs, according to Sen. Greg Hembree (R-District 28).

“When you don’t have that ability to enforce the law. Then you really undermine the entire integrity of the system,” he said.

The Commission is charged with keeping politicians honest by enforcing state elections laws.

“We were way ahead of the country back in when we first passed them. We were like the lead, they had the best ethics laws in the country for a long time, but other states have caught us and now have passed us,” Hembree said. “For someone who just wants to thumb their nose at the law they can.”

Live 5 spoke with former Charleston County District 20 Constituent School Board chairman Tony Lewis in 2018 to ask about $61,210 owed to the ethics commission. Then he said he didn’t have a problem with being held accountable.

He’s currently listed as owing $60,955, making about a $300 difference.

When Live 5 Investigates followed up, he did say he had been making some payments until the pandemic hit.

But had a different tone, calling the fines “hellacious price tag” in response to a question if he would resume payments.

Lewis no longer holds his position on the board.

Candidates in smaller races report less help and resources, but higher fines

Henry Copeland ran for Charleston County School board in 2012 and ended up owing the ethics commission $7,500 dollars. What began as an initial late fee of $100, ended up snowballing with daily late fees.

He’s now on a payment plan from the Department of Revenue.

“It was a shock in the sense that was far more than I ever spent on the election,” he said. “I think it was a very stiff fine considering the fact we were talking about a missing a filing deadline and we may be talking about reporting maybe $2,000 worth of campaign contributions, but the law is the law. But there ought to be some opportunity in which to rectify a situation that had apparently gone to the other extreme.”

Running a smaller campaign, Copeland recalls little to no support available to him from the state.

We were also able to get in contact with Chris Lovelace who according to the ethics commission owes $31,100 in fines for his 2016 run for Colleton County Sheriff.

Lovelace was just added to the list this past month.

The ethics commission reports he missed several filing deadlines and used campaign funds for personal reasons including gas station, restaurant, and clothing store charges.

Lovelace denies wrongdoing and argues health issues put him at a disadvantage.

“All the campaign funds are accounted for. It’s just that, they weren’t reported on time, at the time frame they wanted. And again, I take responsibility for that. It’s nobody else’s responsibility but mine. But I think the $30,000 is excessive,” he said. “As far as the Ethics Commission, dealing with them, it’s left a sour taste in my mouth.”

Lovelace says he ran because he saw corruption within the department and wanted to do something positive for his community.

He’s currently appealing his case.

Lewis also complained that he wasn’t aware of procedure, and it wasn’t fair to charge him for something he didn’t know about.

“The paperwork is so discouraging from that standpoint that I can easily see where an average person would hesitate to get involved. It places doubt on my desire to run for political office again, " Copeland said.

Banned from holding office

Legislation is in the works that would prevent Copeland and all the others named on the list from running from office again, at least as long as they owe money.

Sen. Hembree of the Peedee area introduced Senate Bill 991 that would prevent candidates with outstanding debts from doing so.

“There was one that we had in Horry County some years ago with a high profile elected official who happened to be a friend of mine, you know, but this person just for whatever reason we’re just steadfastly refused to pay those funds and they got into the tens of thousands of dollars,” Hembree said. “This person continued to serve continue to run for election and continue to get reelected so and still no payment of fine. So I was that was how I became aware of the problem.”

The bill did make it to a subcommittee but ultimately did not pass this legislative session.

Hembree says the bill wasn’t fully ready but he’s hopeful they’ll hit the ground running next year.

“I think that if you want a system, that’s truly accountable. They’re going to have to be more people at the Ethics Commission,” Copeland said. “But they’re going to have to have more of an eye on how to catch the items that can be corrected and how to catch the items that are an abuse of the system, and how to tell the difference between the two.”

The Ethics Commission receives funds from the legislature, but the $2.6 million owed is intended to help keep the department operating.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Loggerheads Continue To Lay Eggs By The Dozen

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye NewsAt last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a...

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News

At last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a nearby dune where they would not be destroyed by the tide or emergency vehicles. Subsequent nests on the Isle of Palms have been laid at the 5A Access Path, the 9A Access Path and in Dewees Inlet near the 17 tee of the Links Golf Course. This fourth IOP nest is now incubating near the Property Owners’ Beach House in Wild Dunes. On Sullivan’s Island, the first nest was laid very close to the Breach Inlet Bridge at the Hunley Memorial Park. This is not even in the area where our volunteers patrol, but others reported seeing the tracks there on May 20. Those eggs were taken to Station 26 to be relocated.

This was an unusually large clutch of 156 eggs. The average number they lay is around 120 eggs. The second SI nest of the season was found near Station 15 not far from Fort Moultrie by Raye Ann Osborne and Joanne Staton on May 24. It is now incubating just northeast of the Station 16 Access Path. In South Carolina, the first nest of the season was laid at Lighthouse Island in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge where more loggerheads nest than anywhere north of Jacksonville, Florida.

As of May 26 there were 923 nests in our state. We are off to a good start and are looking forward to having a very good season. We are also protecting most of our nests from coyote predation with heavy plastic screening.

Here are season reminders that we would like everyone to be aware of to have a safe beach for our loggerheads in 2022:

• Lights Out at Dusk. Any lights that can be seen from the beach should be turned off from dusk to dawn between May 1 and Oct. 31. This is the law on both islands.

• Fill in Holes. Any hole on the beach can trap small hatchlings and also large nesting females.

• Turn off flashlights & don’t use flash photography. If you see a nesting turtle on the beach, stay back at least 50 feet and do not disturb her.

Report any stranded turtles, dead or alive, to (843) 697-8733 or (843) 886-6522. If it has orange paint on it, it has been documented and is awaiting burial. Follow the season at bergwerfgraphics.com or join us on Facebook at Island Turtle Team IOP & SI South Carolina.

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