Computer Support in Seabrook Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company’s IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in – we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Seabrook Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Seabrook Island, SC.

Areas Served

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And when we say “full range of computer support,” we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Seabrook Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS’ fully managed computer support in Seabrook Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don’t have to build an in-house solution. We’re talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS’ CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses’ growth.

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IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS’ Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We’ll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Seabrook Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don’t plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn’t have to be with ITS by your side.

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Cloud Computer Services in Charleston

Cloud Computer Services In Seabrook Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS’ Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS’ sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Seabrook Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company’s antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best – keeping your customers satisfied.

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Additional Computer Services in Charleston

Additional Computer Services In Seabrook Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don’t see a solution to your problem on this page, don’t fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won’t be talking to someone at a call center. You won’t be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don’t see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Seabrook Island

Has sticky-stuff ban hurt Cleveland Indians’ bullpen? Hey, Hoynsie

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Do you have a question that you’d like to have answered in Hey, Hoynsie? Submit it here. You can also subscribe to Subtext here or text Hoynsie at 216-208-4346 for a two-week free trial.Hey, Hoynsie: Has the new enforcement of the foreign substance rule been a big part...

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Do you have a question that you’d like to have answered in Hey, Hoynsie? Submit it here. You can also subscribe to Subtext here or text Hoynsie at 216-208-4346 for a two-week free trial.

Hey, Hoynsie: Has the new enforcement of the foreign substance rule been a big part of the Indians’ pitching woes, particularly in the bullpen as of late? It’s no secret that James Karinchak has been a completely different pitcher with the rule enforcement. Should the Indians consider moving on from him if there is an opportunity? -- Jared Lange, Wabash, Ind.

Hey, Jared: The Indians warned their pitchers in spring training that this crackdown was coming. They were warned again in early June to part ways with the sticky stuff if they were using it. I think they’ve had time to adjust.

I’m not saying a drop in spin rate hasn’t played a part in Karinchak and the bullpen’s recent troubles, but the fact that they’re having to cover four innings almost every night, while facing elite teams such as the Rays, A’s and Astros, can’t be overlooked.

If the Indians trade Karinchak, at least from the outside looking in, I think that would be a mistake. He’s averaging 14.33 strikeouts per nine innings and the opposition is hitting .146 against him. He’s 25 and started the season with just over one year in the big leagues. You build bullpens with pitchers like that.

Hey, Hoynsie: Are the Cleveland Guardians guarding the exits at Progressive Field so the fans don’t leave early? -- Rick, Toledo.

Hey, Rick: I see what you did there. A word of caution, there’s room for only one wise guy around here.

Hey, Hoynsie: Out of curiosity, how long ago did Joe Noga and you know what the name was? -- Darron, Denver.

Hey, Darron: Believe me, if we knew that the Indians new name would be the Guardians before it was announced, we would have written it. The Indians, as they usually do, played this close to the vest.

On Thursday I found out that they’d settled on a name, but couldn’t find out what the name was so I wrote what I knew. Friday morning the team announced its new name.

Hey, Hoynsie: There’s not much to say other than the whole Indians’ organization from ownership down to general manager has lost any semblance of respect for history and lacks intestinal fortitude. They are a laughing stock and as a lifelong Indians fan, I am ashamed. The reason they gave for coming up with the name defied any logic. -- Hank, Seabrook Island, S.C.

Hey, Hank: I understand your disappointment, but I think changing the name of the franchise showed intestinal fortitude. They knew they’d be upsetting lifelong fans, they’ve been dealing with the backlash since announcing their intentions to change the name in December of 2020, but they felt it was the right thing to do.

Hey, Hoynsie: What’s happening with Brad Peacock and the other big-league veteran pitchers that the Indians signed to possibly help the rotation? -- Bill, Franklin, Tenn.

Hey, Bill: Veteran right-handers Peacock (0-1, 10.80) and Zack Godley (0-2, 9.20) have had their problems since signing minor-league deals and reported to Class AAA Columbus. Peacock, injured most of last year with Houston, has allowed 10 earned runs in 8 1/3 innings. Godley, who appeared in two games with the Brewers this year, has allowed 15 earned runs over 10 innings in four starts.

Hey, Hoynsie: Do the Indians still have a realistic chance at a wild card spot this year? Or is it time to get ready for the debut of the Guardians in 2022? -- .Jose, Downingtown, Pa.

Hey, Jose: If they keep losing games in the late innings as they’ve done Thursday and Friday, you can start looking for your Guardians’ gear. As of Saturday morning the Indians were six games out of the second wild card spot with Seattle, the Yankees and Toronto in front of them.

In the AL Central, they trailed the White Sox by nine games. Nine games back in late July is a steep hill to climb.

Hey, Hoynsie: What do you think the timetable is for Shane Bieber and Aaron Civale’s return? This season is slipping away one week at a time and it’s going to take more than one minor trade to save it. -- Mike Fumic, Avon.

Hey, Mike: Civale (right middle finger) is currently on a faster path than Bieber (right shoulder). Civale threw a bullpen session Friday. If all goes well, he could throw another one in a couple of days. A simulated game and a couple of rehab starts could follow if there are no setbacks. Perhaps he’s back by mid-August.

Bieber is playing catch, but hasn’t thrown off the mound yet.

Hey, Hoynsie: Amed Rosario is not a shortstop solution. He plays poor defense with little or any range and has settled into being a mediocre hitter. Does he have any trade value before the deadline? -- Doc, Warren.

Hey, Doc: Rosario is an interesting player to say the least. I think he’s got great range going to his right, but he’s limited trying to make the diving play at or behind second base. He’ll make a wildly athletic play and then come up empty on a ball hit through the middle.

I think he’s been one of the Indians’ most consistent hitters, especially since he was moved to shortstop full time in May.

As for trade value, I wonder if the Mets miss him with Francisco Lindor on the injured list?

More on the Guardians

More Indians coverage

How to Have a Fun, Multigenerational Family Vacation

Feeling released after a terrible year, this summer many families are hitting the road or taking to the skies with three or more generations, together.How can family vacations live up to the name, providing time to feel close but also time off the clock? Parents who had children at home for remote school for much of the last year may ache for a chance to catch their breath. Grandparents yearn to be with their families at last, without feeling as if they’re operating a day care center.Here’s how experts in family dyn...

Feeling released after a terrible year, this summer many families are hitting the road or taking to the skies with three or more generations, together.

How can family vacations live up to the name, providing time to feel close but also time off the clock? Parents who had children at home for remote school for much of the last year may ache for a chance to catch their breath. Grandparents yearn to be with their families at last, without feeling as if they’re operating a day care center.

Here’s how experts in family dynamics, and some grandparents and parents, suggest to best pull that off.

Talk through expectations in advance.

Elise Tarbi, 35, a nurse practitioner in Boston, took planning seriously. Before she, her husband and their 3-year-old shared a cabin in Maine with her parents for a week, she asked each adult to name a vacation goal.

“All I really wanted was some quiet time with coffee and a book, because that’s gone when you have a child,” she said. She achieved her goal, and so did her husband (who wanted a hike), her father (kayaking) and her mother (a nature preserve visit). Sometimes that meant doing things separately.

Find ways to share chores, particularly child care.

Every other summer, Emily Morgan, 61, the host of the podcast The Grand Life (on which this reporter has been a guest), and her husband, Mike, leave their Indiana home to spend five nights with their four grown children, spouses and grandchildren. They’ve visited Savannah, Ga.; Gatlinburg, Tenn., and coastal Maine.

“We told them, ‘One evening, we will watch the kids and you go out,’” Ms. Morgan said. “Which is a positive way of saying, ‘We’re not watching the kids every night.’”

At first, the older Morgans handled meals, but as their family expanded — to 20 people on their latest vacation — they began to wilt. Now, each adult couple takes full responsibility for one dinner during their stay, including menu, shopping, cooking and cleanup.

Discuss who pays for what.

On family trips, “there is very little money flowing uphill” to the older generation, Madonna Harrington Meyer, a Syracuse University sociologist and author of “Grandmothers at Work,” has found in her research.

Grandparents often default to picking up the tab, especially when children are visiting, but grandparents may be near or in retirement. Hosting costs can increase with each in-law and grandchild.

The senior Morgans used to shoulder vacation rentals, until their growing family meant bigger houses at higher prices. Now, they ask each family to pay one-fifth.

However, for the past few years, Donna and David Bolls, who live in Charlotte, N.C., have accepted a daughter’s invitation to join her family in a cottage on Seabrook Island, S.C. She declined their offer to pay part of the week’s rent.

“We try to grab the check if we go out to eat,” Ms. Bolls, 65, said. “Sometimes we split the groceries. We don’t want them footing the whole bill, even if they can afford it.” Caring for their grandchildren, 5-year-old twins, helps balance the ledger.

Beware of old patterns.

“People tend to fall back into their usual roles without thinking,” said Sally Tannen, an early childhood educator who for years has led the parenting and grandparenting workshops at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan.

Adult children can regress, expecting their parents to take care of them and their children. “But you’re an adult now,” Ms. Tannen noted. Similarly, grandparents may anticipate being in charge, a recipe for conflict in close quarters. “We’ve always been the caregivers, and it’s hard to let go of,” she said. “We like to hold on to control.”

Like other experts, she cautioned that the middle generation sets the rules for their children, and that grandparents should defer and avoid criticizing those decisions.

When her toddler grandson wanted some of her maple ice cream — having recently moved to Vermont, Ms. Tannen and her husband are hosting children and grandchildren all summer — she asked his mother. “I was told to only give him two teaspoons,” she said. “I respected that.”

At the same time, grandparents may have lost some stamina or mobility.

Mary Scott-Boria, 70, and her husband live in Chicago, but own a small camper they park in a rural recreation facility 90 minutes away.

Lately, when they invite their children for a few days, “my daughters tend to take charge,” Ms. Scott-Boria said. “They manage the cooking and the cleaning and the activities. I don’t have to be the responsible one.” It’s meant change for the once undisputed matriarch, but “I’ve learned to be OK with it.”

Allow for down time.

When Rosie Cantu vacationed with three of her grandchildren on Bolivar Peninsula on the Texas Gulf Coast a few years back, everyone knew the rule: Afternoons, the children amused themselves with board games and puzzles while Lita (from “abuelita,” Spanish for grandmother) relaxed.

“That was my alone time and it re-energized me for the rest of the day,” said Ms. Cantu, 76, a semiretired teacher from San Antonio.

“It’s OK not to fill every minute,” said Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek, a psychologist at Temple University and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

She and her husband, planning an excursion with their two grandchildren, expect to hear “I’m bored!” and won’t be fazed. “I will say, ‘it’s up to you to figure out how to fill this time.’”

Flexibility helps all parties enjoy themselves.

Ms. Tarbi and her husband packed their toddler son’s ‘OK to Wake’ clock, which turns green when he is allowed to get out of bed just after 7 a.m. They had been working for months to curtail his early rising.

But on their first day in Maine, her father — excited to be with his grandson — heard him chirping and forgot the clock. Shortly after 6 a.m., a no-longer-asleep Ms. Tarbi could hear them playing. She later reminded her father, who apologized, and “I had to get over it,” Ms. Tarbi said. “Some routines are not as important on vacation.”

What counts, experts and family members agree, is having time together, especially this year. It’s lovely to have unscheduled days when nobody has to rush to work or school, when there’s time for an impromptu ice cream cone or conversation or Scrabble game.

“Family vacations really matter,” Dr. Hirsh-Pasek said. “Building in-person relationships is invaluable.” To show grandchildren that other adults besides their parents love and care for them, to remind parents that someone else has their back, to build memories and traditions — that may be worth some compromises.

MUSC Health is moving forward with emergency room, medical services in southern Charleston County

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCBD) – MUSC Health announced Thursday plans to move forward with a project aimed at bringing emergency care to people living in remote areas of southern Charleston County.In researching plans for a new facility, MUSC said the sea islands – including Johns, Kiawah, and Seabrook Islands – are geographically isolated with residents located more than 20 miles away from the nearest hospital.These coastal communities, according to MUSC’s plans, are home to a large population of senior...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCBD) – MUSC Health announced Thursday plans to move forward with a project aimed at bringing emergency care to people living in remote areas of southern Charleston County.

In researching plans for a new facility, MUSC said the sea islands – including Johns, Kiawah, and Seabrook Islands – are geographically isolated with residents located more than 20 miles away from the nearest hospital.

These coastal communities, according to MUSC’s plans, are home to a large population of seniors, who generally have a need for both outpatient and emergent care services. They say double-digit growth is expected over the next five years, with about 31,000 additional 65+ residents in the service area.

The addition would provide enhanced access to MUSC Health’s primary stroke center and chest pain center.

Kiawah Partners is donating six acres of land to the Medical University Hospital Authority to build a free-standing emergency department and medical office along a portion of Seabrook Island Road near the Bohicket Marina.

“After seven years of working side by side with MUSC to bring this important project to fruition, we could not be prouder to donate the six acres of land needed for the development and to continue our partnership with the MUSC team,” said Chris Randolph with Kiawah Partners.

The emergency department will include four exam rooms, two trauma rooms, imaging lab services and a rooftop helicopter pad – including MUSC Health says the medical offices will offer both primary and specialty care.

“This new facility will bring vitally important world-class medical care to Kiawah, Seabrook and the Sea Islands residents, which will only add to the exceptional experience that comes with living here,” Randolph said.

Additionally, a telemedicine network will connect the entire facility to MUSC Health providers in downtown Charleston for additional care and consultation.

“People living in this area have to travel 30 or 45 minutes to reach the nearest hospital, sometimes more depending on traffic. That’s a big problem for someone having a stroke or cardiac event,” said Patrick J. Cawley, M.D., MUSC Health CEO and vice president for Health Affairs, University. “This new facility brings that care directly into the community. We’re extremely grateful to Kiawah Partners for helping to make that possible.”

Leaders say the project is estimated to cost $24 million. MUSC is working to raise $15 million of that cost in private support.

McMillan Pazdan Smith (MPS) was chosen to design the project back in June.

Construction on the Sea Islands project is expected to begin in early 2022 and conclude in fall 2023.

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