Computer Support in Rock Hill SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company’s IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in – we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Rock Hill, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Rock Hill, SC.

Areas Served

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And when we say “full range of computer support,” we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Rock Hill, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS’ fully managed computer support in Rock Hill, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don’t have to build an in-house solution. We’re talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS’ CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses’ growth.

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IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS’ Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We’ll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Rock Hill, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don’t plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn’t have to be with ITS by your side.

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Cloud Computer Services in Charleston

Cloud Computer Services In Rock Hill, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS’ Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS’ sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Rock Hill, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company’s antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best – keeping your customers satisfied.

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Additional Computer Services in Charleston

Additional Computer Services In Rock Hill, SC

If you are having IT issues but don’t see a solution to your problem on this page, don’t fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won’t be talking to someone at a call center. You won’t be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don’t see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Rock Hill

Storm brings sleet, ice, and threat of power outages to the Rock Hill region

A winter storm system brought snow, sleet, freezing rain and slippery roads to the Rock Hill region Sunday morning.A winter storm warning remains in effect throughout the day for York County, and an ice storm warning is posted for Chester and Lancaster counties.National Weather Service meteorologists say freezing rain, which can trigger power outages, could be the big problem across the region.“Power outages and tree damage are likely, due to the ice,” said meteorologist Mike Rehnberg, of the Weather Service&...

A winter storm system brought snow, sleet, freezing rain and slippery roads to the Rock Hill region Sunday morning.

A winter storm warning remains in effect throughout the day for York County, and an ice storm warning is posted for Chester and Lancaster counties.

National Weather Service meteorologists say freezing rain, which can trigger power outages, could be the big problem across the region.

“Power outages and tree damage are likely, due to the ice,” said meteorologist Mike Rehnberg, of the Weather Service’s office in Greer. “Travel could be nearly impossible.”

Forecasters said they expect precipitation to change from a mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain to all freezing rain by mid-morning Sunday.

Ice accumulations of up to .4 of an inch are possible, forecasters say.

The S.C. Department of Transportation treated roads across the Rock Hill region with a brine solution on Friday and Saturday. The brine is designed to melt ice as it forms.

Shortly after daybreak Sunday, major roads in the three counties were reported to be partially snow and ice-covered. Secondary roads were reported to be ice-covered, according to the DOT.

The S.C. Highway Patrol reported a wreck shortly before 7 a.m. on northbound Interstate 77, near Exit 82 in Rock Hill. Two lanes were closed for about an hour, but the road was reopened by 8:45 a.m.

But the sheriff’s offices in York, Chester and Lancaster counties urged residents to stay off the roads until the storm has ended.

A number of churches across York County canceled morning services.

The precipitation arrived from the southwest around 1:30 a.m. Sunday, in the form of light snow.

The National Weather Service said precipitation changed to sleet around 4 a.m. and then began mixing with freezing rain by 7 a.m.

Freezing rain was reported to be falling in all three counties by 9 a.m. Sunday.

Freezing rain could be the big problem with this storm.

The S.C. Highway Patrol reported trees in the Columbia area were weighed down with ice accumulations Sunday morning.

Duke Energy officials said they are anticipating up to 750,000 customers in the Carolinas could lose power from the storm. The utility company called in thousands of repair crews from Florida, Texas and the Midwest to deal with the storm’s impact.

As of 9 a.m. Sunday, about 45,000 power outages were reported in South Carolina. Most of those were in Oconee and Pickens counties, in the northwest corner of the state.

But more than 100,000 outages were reported in Georgia, especially in counties bordering South Carolina. Freezing rain began falling in those areas a few hours ago.

The freezing rain could change to a cold rain Sunday afternoon, as temperatures nose slightly above freezing. Precipitation is forecast to change back to snow briefly Sunday evening before ending.

Sunday’s storm is predicted to usher in an extended period of cold and potentially stormy weather.

Behind the storm, cold weather is forecast for the MLK Jr. Holiday on Monday. Despite sunny skies, afternoon highs are only predicted to reach the lower 40s. And Rock Hill-area residents could awaken to temperatures in the upper teens Tuesday.

Even colder air is expected to surge into the area later in the week, with another threat of snow around Friday, according to forecasters.

“Temperatures take a nose drive for the end of the work week, with the current maximum temperature forecast to struggle to get above freezing Friday afternoon,” National Weather Service meteorologist Justin Lane said.

Steve Lyttle on Twitter: @slyttle

York County roads ‘very slick’ as freezing rain and temperatures fall in winter storm

Freezing rain and 20-mph wind gusts welcomed Rock Hill residents early Sunday morning, leaving roads covered and in poor conditions, officials said.York County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Trent Faris said the roads are “very slick” all over the county. The sheriff’s office is urging residents to stay home and avoid the interstate. Just before 8 a.m., patrol deputies responded to a two-vehicle crash involving a tractor trailer, Faris said.Temperatures across the area have dropped, including in Lancaster an...

Freezing rain and 20-mph wind gusts welcomed Rock Hill residents early Sunday morning, leaving roads covered and in poor conditions, officials said.

York County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Trent Faris said the roads are “very slick” all over the county. The sheriff’s office is urging residents to stay home and avoid the interstate. Just before 8 a.m., patrol deputies responded to a two-vehicle crash involving a tractor trailer, Faris said.

Temperatures across the area have dropped, including in Lancaster and Chester counties, and were expected to stay around freezing throughout the day, weather service officials said. At 9 a.m., the temperature was 28 degrees at the Rock Hill-York County airport.

The freezing rain is expected to continue throughout the afternoon, accumulating up to a quarter of an inch of ice, according to the National Weather Service. Wind gusts could reach up to 38 mph but should decrease to about 8 to 13 mph in the afternoon, officials said.

Although residents across the county may not see large amounts of snow, York County officials said the freezing rain is a danger on the roads.

The South Carolina Highway Patrol advised residents to stay home and avoid travel. By 10 a.m., there had been several collisions across York, Lancaster and Chester counties, all of which result in no injuries, according to the state’s real-time traffic incident reports.

South Carolina Department of Transportation crews have been plowing snow and ice in York County early Sunday, and urged residents not to travel, officials said.

“Please be cautious of de-icing operations and reduce your speed,” SCDOT said on Twitter.

About 50,000 power outages were reported across the Carolinas, with only a small number affecting the Rock Hill area.

Duke Energy reported around 300 customers in York County without service around 10:30 a.m., according to the utility’s outage map. Most of those were southeast of Rock Hill near the Chester County line, the map showed. the map showed.

York Electric Cooperative showed more than 900 customers without service at 10:30 a.m. Most of those were southwest of Rock Hill, the map showed.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

This story was originally published January 16, 2022 10:14 AM.

Weather experts predict wintry weather. What does that mean for the Rock Hill region?

Road crews and utility companies stepped up preparations Friday for a winter storm that could bring significant amounts of snow, sleet and ice to the Rock Hill area and much of the Carolinas on Sunday.A Winter Storm Watch is in effect for the area, with forecasters saying the big threat for the Rock Hill region will be freezing rain and sleet.The National Weather Service’s latest forecast calls for around .4 of an inch of ice accumulation in York, Chester and Lancaster counties. Experts say scattered power outages can be ...

Road crews and utility companies stepped up preparations Friday for a winter storm that could bring significant amounts of snow, sleet and ice to the Rock Hill area and much of the Carolinas on Sunday.

A Winter Storm Watch is in effect for the area, with forecasters saying the big threat for the Rock Hill region will be freezing rain and sleet.

The National Weather Service’s latest forecast calls for around .4 of an inch of ice accumulation in York, Chester and Lancaster counties. Experts say scattered power outages can be expected when ice accumulations exceed .25 of an inch.

To make matters worse, breezy conditions are forecast Sunday with the storm.

Duke Energy officials said Friday they are calling in 600 utility repair workers from Florida and the Midwest, in addition to the 1,000 Carolinas employees ready to fix outages.

“Customers need to be prepared for a wintry mix that will bring with it the potential to cause outages in our service area,” said Jason Hollifield, Duke Energy Carolinas’ storm director. “We have power line and tree crews, along with other storm personnel, ready to safely respond to power outages this weekend.”

The S.C. Department of Transportation will be applying a brine mixture to highways Friday and Saturday, in an effort to prevent ice formation on roads.

Friday’s sunny skies and high temperatures in the mid 50s are a far cry from what can be expected late Saturday and Sunday across the region, forecasters say.

Colder air is predicted to funnel into the region Saturday, with highs only reaching the mid 40s under cloudy skies.

The storm system expected to affect the area took shape Friday over the Rockies. Precipitation from that storm is expected to arrive in the Rock Hill region late Saturday night.

“Conditions will then go downhill in a hurry Saturday night,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Justin Lane.

Snow will mix with or change to sleet in the Rock Hill area in the early-morning hours Sunday, then mix with or change to freezing rain sometime Sunday morning. Freezing rain is predicted to continue into Sunday afternoon.

The precipitation is predicted to change back to light snow Sunday evening before ending.

“Damaging accumulations of ice appear more likely along and south of a line from Anderson, to Spartanburg, to Gastonia, to Salisbury, including Charlotte and vicinity,” Lane said.

The Weather Service said it expects about 1 inch of snow and sleet accumulation in the Rock Hill area. Much heavier snow totals are forecast to the north, in the North Carolina foothills and mountains.

Duke Energy officials encouraged residents to use Friday and Saturday to prepare for the storm.

They said residents should make sure they have flashlights, batteries, bottled water and non-perishable foods, as well as a battery-power radio or television for news updates.

Families with people who are elderly or have special medical needs should make alternate shelter arrangements, Duke Energy officials added.

Cold air is predicted to follow the storm, so black ice could be a problem Monday and Tuesday mornings, forecasters say.

Highs on Monday and Tuesday are only expected to reach the low 40s, despite sunshine. And Tuesday morning lows could be near 15 degrees, meteorologists say.

The cold weather is forecast to continue for the rest of the month, and if all this isn’t enough, meteorologists say they are watching a pattern late next week that could bring another threat of wintry weather..

Steve Lyttle on Twitter: @slyttl

This story was originally published January 12, 2022 11:30 AM.

Would snow cancel school or send it virtual in the Rock Hill region? What we know now

A grade school tradition could meet a modern alternative early next week. What exactly might become of the snow day?With significant snow, ice or wintry mix in the weekend forecast, area school districts could face a new challenge. Traditionally, if roads weren’t deemed safe due to winter weather, students didn’t go to school. When COVID-19 hit, districts across the country invented and introduced a range of virtual school options.Weather forecasts for Saturday night into Sunday, show cold temperatures and precipita...

A grade school tradition could meet a modern alternative early next week. What exactly might become of the snow day?

With significant snow, ice or wintry mix in the weekend forecast, area school districts could face a new challenge. Traditionally, if roads weren’t deemed safe due to winter weather, students didn’t go to school. When COVID-19 hit, districts across the country invented and introduced a range of virtual school options.

Weather forecasts for Saturday night into Sunday, show cold temperatures and precipitation that could bring snow and ice. Some current models show 2-4 inches of snow possible in the Rock Hill region. Whether that winter weather materializes or how severe it might be should become clearer as the weekend progresses.

As of Thursday morning, it was too early to say what impact the weather might have on Fort Mill schools. A day off or a virtual learning day are on the table.

“We have not made a determination at this time but we have asked schools to prepare for either option should we miss school due to weather,” said Joe Burke, district spokesperson.

The area hasn’t had a significant, widespread snowfall since schools developed virtual options in spring 2020.

In a traditional snow day students don’t have school, but would make up the day later in the school calendar. A virtual day could count as traditional instruction. It could be live virtual, or have students work on their own.

“There are a lot of factors that will determine if the day out is used for an eLearning day or if a later day would be selected,” Burke said. “Some of these factors depend on the severity of the storm and possible damage done in our area.”

A little before noon Friday, the district sent a message to parents that schools were asked to have students and staff take necessary items, lesson plans and devices home should they need them next week due to weather.

“This is a precautionary measure and we have not made the final decision to transition to eLearning yet but we want students and staff to be prepared should we face issues from the severe weather in our area,” reads the message.

Area schools may not get their test run with this storm. It may not bring snow and ice. If it does, schools have an extra day for roads to thaw with Monday off for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Or, ice could linger into Tuesday to force a decision.

Like Fort Mill, Rock Hill Schools have a plan as the threat of snow or ice approaches.

Rock Hill Schools spokesperson Lindsay Machak told The Herald in an email that the district will make every effort to ensure students’ educational opportunities continue while at home.

The district, through the state, has the flexibility to use five eLearning days each year for inclement weather. That means in the event of ice, snow or torrentially terrible wind, the district would use an “eLearning day,” which, in other words, is a day when students receive work through an online platform and must complete it within a certain time.

“If for some reason we run out of eLearning days, we would use the weather days (snow days) and then have to make them up as dictated by our calendar make-up days,” Machak said.

It would take a significant storm to force the question in Clover or York. Both districts are scheduled to be off Tuesday.

The Clover School District board voted Wednesday during a special meeting to move the originally scheduled teacher workday from March 14 to Jan. 18. The calendar change was made because a significant number of staff are out as a result of COVID-19, according to the district’s website.

Clover School District spokesperson Bryan Dillon told The Herald in an email that the district’s calendar has three days built in to be used as bad weather make-up days, which is required by the state. The district also has the ability to call an “eLearning day” in the case of inclement weather, he said.

Since the district has the ability to plan in advance, the district could call an “eLearning day” on Wednesday if the weather requires it, Dillon said.

“CSD will be closely monitoring the amount of weather we receive and its impact on our roads,” he said.

York School District students also are scheduled to be off Tuesday. York School District spokesperson Tim Cooper told The Herald that the district is monitoring the weather and has started considering its options.

The district’s board voted Thursday during an emergency meeting to amend its calendar, moving the originally scheduled teacher workday on Feb. 18 to Jan. 18, according to the agenda. The change was made to “assist with staff and student COVID-19 numbers that are reaching a critical point,” according to a release from the district.

A decision won’t be made for Chester schools until there is a better picture of Tuesday’s conditions, Chester County School District’s public information officer Chris Christoff said.

“The District has designated virtual days on reserve for weather related issues if needed. Fortunately Monday is a holiday, so the snow wouldn’t affect the schools,” he said. ‘We will have to wait to see what the conditions are like for Tuesday morning.”

Rock Hill Schools new superintendent Tommy Schmolze: ‘Rock Hill is in my DNA’

Some might know him as Mr. Schmolze. Others might refer to him as Dr. Schmolze. Or Tommy. Or just “Coach.”It’s Tuesday night at South Pointe High School — still several weeks before Tommy Schmolze begins his tenure as Rock Hill Schools superintendent on Jan. 31 — and the man who responds to a bunch of well-worn names is shaking the hands of the people he’ll lead in 2022 and beyond.He’s met many of them before. Some were even former students, he said. Knowing this community is a product ...

Some might know him as Mr. Schmolze. Others might refer to him as Dr. Schmolze. Or Tommy. Or just “Coach.”

It’s Tuesday night at South Pointe High School — still several weeks before Tommy Schmolze begins his tenure as Rock Hill Schools superintendent on Jan. 31 — and the man who responds to a bunch of well-worn names is shaking the hands of the people he’ll lead in 2022 and beyond.

He’s met many of them before. Some were even former students, he said. Knowing this community is a product of living in the city of Rock Hill for over two decades and spending a chunk of his teaching career here.

It’s also a result, it appears, of just being who he is.

Schmolze (pronounced Sh-mall-zee) was named the Rock Hill school district’s new superintendent in early December. The district set up meet-and-greets like the one on Tuesday in the district’s three high schools so families and staff and other community leaders can hear his “philosophy as an educational leader.”

In a nutshell?

“The word you can write in capital letters is ‘relationships,’” Schmolze told The Herald, shedding an energetic smile. “That’s what this is all about.”

Schmolze grew up in a 70,000-person town called Waukesha in Wisconsin. When he was 15, he moved to South Carolina and attended North Augusta High School before enrolling at Clemson University.

In 1993, upon graduating from Clemson, he got his first teaching as English teacher at Northwestern High School in Rock Hill. He also coached several sports: He was the head boys’ tennis coach and an assistant on the volleyball and girls’ basketball teams. (He played volleyball throughout high school and college, he said.)

He spent six years at Northwestern. After that, he bounced around York County professionally but never stopped living in Rock Hill. He first went to Fort Mill Middle School — spending six years as an assistant principal then three years as principal — and then served as principal at Clover High School for two years.

In 2011, he returned to Fort Mill as the district’s assistant superintendent, having a hand in executing the district’s most impactful decisions as the area witnessed a decade’s worth of rapid population growth. He said the key to sustaining and managing the growth centered on never losing sight of the fact that each new student needed to be cared for — that “even though they were one of 17,000, as opposed to one in 3,000 15 years ago, we still wanted to make that opportunity so special to that family.”

And that will be the crux of his philosophy as head of Rock Hill Schools, he said.

“As a school leader, I’ve got to work hand-in-hand to welcome these families,” Schmolze said. “That’s one thing about public schools that I love: We serve everybody. Doesn’t matter if you’re from Waukesha, Wisconsin, or if you grew up right across the street. We’re going to love on ya.”

Schmolze is replacing Bill Cook, who had been the district’s superintendent since 2018 before unexpectedly esigning one week into the 2021-22 school year. John Jones has acted as the district’s superintendent in the interim.

When asked about his specific goals, Schmolze said he’s leery of leaders who come in and implement change before truly learning where they are and who they’re working for.

That said, he mentioned several action items he considers “paramount.”

Among them: providing adequate mental health resources to students (a priority Schmolze shares with his predecessor); valuing choice schools and neighborhood schools; boosting the district’s test scores; attracting and retaining teachers (an issue that all districts across the state are facing); and making district staff and school administrators visible in the classroom.

“One of the goals that I can share is, I want us at the district office to get out to schools as much as we can,” Schmolze said. “We have experts in the field. I don’t want them in an office on Main Street. I want them rubbing shoulders with principals and teachers. That’s where the rubber meets the road. That’s what we’re here to do on a daily basis.”

Schmolze lives with his wife, Karen, and is the father of two sons, Kam (24) and Collin (21). He also lives with two dogs, Duke and Jager.

And they’ve all, because of different moments over the years, called Rock Hill home, Schmolze said.

“I distinctly remember the first year I was here, and we went to the Come See Me parade and activities. The whole community was there,” he said.

The longtime resident added that he’s played pickup basketball for years in the community and has “watched kids go from diapers to dunking on me. And that’s a humbling experience.

“But that’s how it’s been. That’s who I am. Rock Hill is in my DNA.”

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