Computer Support in Rock Hill SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Rock Hill, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Rock Hill, SC.

IT Support Rock Hill, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Rock Hill, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Rock Hill, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Rock Hill, SC
 Computer Services Rock Hill, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Rock Hill, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Rock Hill, SC
 Cloud Services Rock Hill, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Rock Hill, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Rock Hill, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Rock Hill, SC
 Data Security Rock Hill, SC

Additional Computer Services In Rock Hill, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Rock Hill, SC

York County files lawsuit against David Tepper, Rock Hill over 'failed vanity project'

ROCK HILL, S.C. — York County officials filed a lawsuit this week against several of Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper's companies and the city of Rock Hill over the team's now-dead training facility, calling it a "failed vanity project."The lawsuit alleges that Appaloosa Management, LP, DT Sports H...

ROCK HILL, S.C. — York County officials filed a lawsuit this week against several of Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper's companies and the city of Rock Hill over the team's now-dead training facility, calling it a "failed vanity project."

The lawsuit alleges that Appaloosa Management, LP, DT Sports Holding, LLC, and Tepper Sports Holding Inc., misappropriated $21 million of public funding on the failed project. The suit states the money was specifically allocated for road expansion related to the project but that "rather than covering the ballooning project budget themselves, the Tepper defendants took money from York County and its taxpayers."

“The water gets real muddy down at the bottom, and I think this is where we are at," York County councilmember William "Bump" Roddey said. "We’re at the lowest point at this agreement.”

Earlier this month, York County issued a statement saying it expected to receive that $21 million plus interest, saying it was designated for the expansion of Mt. Gallant Road.

The lawsuit also blames the city of Rock Hill for failing to issue the required bonds, leading to the project's failure. The suit states this led to Tepper and Rock Hill pointing fingers over whose fault it was, harming York County and its taxpayers.

In a statement, the City of Rock Hill issued a sharp rebuttal to the lawsuit:

"The County has needlessly and recklessly commenced a frivolous lawsuit against the City. Time will reveal that this lawsuit was a colossal waste of public money. We reiterate the City has not breached any contract involving the Panther’s project and remains eager to present the facts in any forum against any party desiring an adversarial posture with the City.

The County’s current lawsuit is both unfortunate and baseless. The City certainly did not cause the County to turn over $21 million to the Panthers to complete a Pennies for Progress project. The City has offered to work side-by-side with the County to protect the interests of our citizens. The City has previously offered to conference with the County’s lawyers and provide the factual foundation showing the City is not in breach of any agreement. That the County commenced this lawsuit against the City without carefully examining these facts is disturbing and revealing as to the County’s priorities and agenda. Every City resident is a County taxpayer. We feel strongly that the City and County should be working arm-in-arm to ensure that the taxpayers in the City and County are best protected. Apparently, a majority of the York County Council do not agree, which is regrettable.

As communicated previously, the City will not litigate any legal dispute through back-and-forth media exchanges and will have no further comment on this matter."

The lawsuit seeks the full $21 million from Tepper's companies, plus any increased construction costs related to the Mt. Gallant expansion. The suit also seeks lost tax revenue that would've been generated by the training facility.

"The Tepper defendants spent the Penny Tax Funds for purposes other than the completion of the Mt. Gallant Project," the lawsuit reads. "Upon information and belief, none of the Penny Tax Funds went to its intended purpose. To date, no progress has been made toward the completion of the Mt. Gallant expanded scope."

South Carolina representative Tommy Pope was one of the state officials fighting to bring the Panthers project to Rock Hill, and like many, he said he is disappointed it ended in a legal fight.

“As a citizen, we were so excited," Pope said. "From a legislative standpoint, we worked hard to do the things we need to do to make it happen."

Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys said Thursday that Tepper's company GT Real Estate filed bankruptcy to avoid paying contractors for their labor on the project.

A spokesperson for GT Real Estate declined to comment on this story. Earlier this month, the organization released a statement on the bankruptcy filing which said, "[GT Real Estate] is taking this action to ensure legitimate claims are processed as fairly and expeditiously as possible under a court supervised process, and to achieve the project’s orderly and safe wind-down. GTRE intends to resolve its legitimate obligations.”

According to court paperwork, GT Real Estate owes creditors millions of dollars. Among them is York County, with a claim of $21 million, as well as Mascaro/Barton Malow, a joint venture construction management group over the site project, with a $26 million claim. On the filing paperwork, the city of Rock Hill is listed as a creditor for just over $100 in unpaid utility payments.

“The city of Rock Hill invested $20 million in public infrastructure on the site, so there’s more than $20 million of public infrastructure in the ground on the site,” Gettys said. “So when and if whoever buys that property, they’ll buy that it improved and we’ll make sure the taxpayers get the benefit of the investment they made in the site.”

Gettys said he and the city have not spoken publicly because of active litigation, saying he doesn’t want to say anything more that will undermine litigation strategy.

A spokesperson for GT Real Estate declined comment.

Rock Hill Mayor: Panthers owner filed bankruptcy in training facility to avoid paying contractors

ROCK HILL, S.C. — Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys spoke out for the first time since the Carolina Panthers terminated agreements to build a training facility in Rock Hill and David Tepper’s GT Real Estate ...

ROCK HILL, S.C. — Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys spoke out for the first time since the Carolina Panthers terminated agreements to build a training facility in Rock Hill and David Tepper’s GT Real Estate subsequently filed for bankruptcy, accusing Tepper of filing bankruptcy to avoid paying contractors for their work on the project.

Following a press conference announcing a new development on the south side of Rock Hill Thursday morning, Gettys addressed concerns about the future of the 200-plus acre site and the unfinished building on it, both of which are owned by Tepper’s organizations.

“That site is within the city limits. The city of Rock Hill owns the water, we own the sewer, we own the electricity, we have zoning, and we have the entitlements,” said Gettys. “We’ll have what’s there that needs to be there for the people of Rock Hill’s best interest. Nothing is going to be built there or done there without the city of Rock Hill figuring out what is in our best interest going forward.”

In early March, Tepper Sports and Entertainment, another one of David Tepper’s companies, said it was pausing the Rock Hill project because the city of Rock Hill did not hold up its end of the bargain in the deal. WCNC Charlotte later discovered the city failed to secure $225 million in bonds to pay for roads, sidewalks and other public infrastructure on the site.

Gettys denies any wrongdoing by the city. In a statement released in April, the city of Rock Hill said that it “met all obligations required under the agreements.”

“With the Panthers, the owner filed for bankruptcy in order to get away from paying his general contractors that they got to move down to this area, which is what it is,” Gettys said on Thursday.

A spokesperson for GT Real Estate declined to comment on this story. Earlier this month, the organization released a statement on the bankruptcy filing which said, "[GT Real Estate] is taking this action to ensure legitimate claims are processed as fairly and expeditiously as possible under a court supervised process, and to achieve the project’s orderly and safe wind-down. GTRE intends to resolve its legitimate obligations.”

According to court paperwork, GT Real Estate owes creditors millions of dollars. Among them is York County, with a claim of $21 million, as well as Mascaro/Barton Malow, a joint venture construction management group over the site project, with a $26 million claim. On the filing paperwork, the city of Rock Hill is listed as a creditor for just over $100 in unpaid utility payments.

Gettys said the city did invest more in that project, but that money went toward public infrastructure that is already in place.

“The city of Rock Hill invested $20 million in public infrastructure on the site, so there’s more than $20 million of public infrastructure in the ground on the site,” said Gettys. “So when and if whoever buys that property, they’ll buy that it improved and we’ll make sure the taxpayers get the benefit of the investment they made in the site.”

Gettys said he and the city have not spoken publicly because of active litigation, saying he doesn’t want to say anything more that will undermine litigation strategy.

Carolina Panthers' practice facility in Rock Hill, SC dead after Chapter 11 filing

AP Sports WriterThe Carolina Panthers' proposed $800 million practice facility project in Rock Hill, South Carolina, is officially dead after team owner David Tepper’s real estate company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Delaware on Wednesday night.Tepper, who made billions in hedge funds, is the NFL’s wealthiest owner. The filing will not affect the NFL’s Panthers or Major League Soccer’s Charlotte FC in any way.It’s unclear at this point what will happen to the ...

AP Sports Writer

The Carolina Panthers' proposed $800 million practice facility project in Rock Hill, South Carolina, is officially dead after team owner David Tepper’s real estate company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in Delaware on Wednesday night.

Tepper, who made billions in hedge funds, is the NFL’s wealthiest owner. The filing will not affect the NFL’s Panthers or Major League Soccer’s Charlotte FC in any way.

It’s unclear at this point what will happen to the half-built practice facility.

Tepper has invested more than $175 million into the facility, which is located about 25 miles south of the team’s current downtown stadium and headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina.

GT Real Estate Holdings, LLC (GTRE), a Delaware limited liability company, announced to The Associated Press in a statement late Wednesday night that is has begun a court-led financial restructuring process in Delaware to effect an orderly wind-down of the project. The action follows the termination and rescission of the agreements with the City of Rock Hill that related to the project, which GTRE previously announced.

GTRE also announced that it has received a commitment for $20 million in financing from DT Sports Holding, LLC, subject to court approval, which will allow the company to fund a process to address its legitimate creditor claims, as well as to preserve, protect and enhance the Rock Hill site for the benefit of all stakeholders.

“In recent weeks, GTRE has been confronted with various claims, some valid and some not, from vendors, contractors and other third parties, including York County, SC," GT Real Estate Holdings said in a statement. "GTRE is taking this action to ensure legitimate claims are processed as fairly and expeditiously as possible under a court supervised process, and to achieve the project’s orderly and safe wind-down. GTRE intends to resolve its legitimate obligations.”

The City of Rock Hill does not plan to make a statement until it has had a chance to review the bankruptcy filing Thursday, a city spokesperson said.

The Panthers announced on April 19 they had terminated their agreement with the City of Rock Hill, South Carolina.

The bankruptcy ends a bitter back-and-forth public disagreement between Tepper and the city of Rock Hill.

Tepper’s company said it negotiated with the city for more than a year, warning them in March they had 30 days or the Panthers would pull out. They said in a statement in April that is “unfortunate that some recently decided to conduct a misguided, destructive public relations campaign to obscure their failures.”

Rock Hill officials responded to the announcement, saying the Panthers' announcement was “misleading and erroneous” and that they embraced the Panthers, welcomed their headquarters to South Carolina and “did everything to make this project a success and has not defaulted on any of our obligations.”

“It was and remains our intention to continue negotiating in good faith while protecting the interests of our taxpayers,” the City of Rock Hill had said. “In fact, in the past few weeks we have attempted to meet with the Panthers on numerous occasions to no avail.”

The city also claimed that it had met all obligations required under the agreement, but could not provide the Panthers unlimited resources and had to protect taxpayers.

The Panthers' headquarters and practice facility had been expected to be completed in 2023.

It is unclear if Tepper will attempt to build another practice in the future and, if so, where that will be.

___

More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/hub/nfl and https://apnews.com/hub/pro-32 and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

What happened in bankruptcy hearing involving Panthers’ failed Rock Hill, SC, project

Thomas Lauria, representing GT Real Estate Holdings Monday in bankruptcy court, outlined for the judge what led to this case after efforts failed that would have brought the Carolina Panthers practice facility and headquarters to Rock Hill.GT Real Estate Holdings is the company that Panthers owner David Tepper established specifically to be the owner and developer of a Rock Hill, S.C., site that would have served as the Carolina ...

Thomas Lauria, representing GT Real Estate Holdings Monday in bankruptcy court, outlined for the judge what led to this case after efforts failed that would have brought the Carolina Panthers practice facility and headquarters to Rock Hill.

GT Real Estate Holdings is the company that Panthers owner David Tepper established specifically to be the owner and developer of a Rock Hill, S.C., site that would have served as the Carolina Panthers’ practice site and headquarters. The project also was projected to include mixed-use retail, offices and a host of other uses.

GT Real Estate Holdings is the debtor for the bankruptcy case filed last week in Delaware.

A virtual hearing was held Monday morning with attorneys representing GT Real Estate, the City of Rock Hill and other parties listed in the case. Judge Karen Owens largely heard preliminary motions involving the use of bank accounts, payment to utility providers at the site and similar items.

The parties met online for almost two hours Monday. They agreed to meet again in a virtual hearing June 29.

Through a series of agreements in recent years, Lauria said, the City of Rock Hill would contribute $225 million through the issuance of municipal bonds. The city and York County would contribute additional funds through tax incentives, and GT Real Estate would fund the rest of the project. Plans involved loans and contributions from the Panthers and affiliates of Tepper Sports & Entertainment.

“The arrangements originally contemplated that the city would use its reasonable best efforts to issue bonds,” Lauria told the court, “and for the funding to be provided by Oct. 31, 2020.”

Lauria said the date was extended to Feb. 26, 2021. GT Real Estate was under no obligation to start construction until bond funding was provided, Lauria said, but did so anyway with a July 2020 groundbreaking.

“Over the next 20 months the project was carried forward to its current partially completed status,” Lauria said.

When it became apparent funding wouldn’t be provided, GT Real Estate first suspended construction and a month later terminated and rescinded two agreements with the city. One is a finance and construction administration agreement, the other a land development agreement.

Laurie did not elaborate on the meaning of these agreements during Monday’s hearing. He did acknowledge that Rock Hill officials dispute GT Real Estate’s ability to terminate and rescind the agreements, and said his group didn’t intend to ask the court Monday for a finding or conclusion on that matter.

“We acknowledge the city’s dispute and we are content, I believe, the city’s content, to reserve all rights for another day,” Lauria said.

Lauria said as of the date GT Real Estate suspended construction in early March, the Panthers had funded about $163.5 million of loans to GT Real Estate. The city had contributed $20 million and the county $21 million.

After construction was suspended, GT Real Estate got funding for a scheduled $19 million payment to the project contractor and subcontractors in two ways, Lauria said. The company sold a parking facility to an affiliate of the Panthers for $15 million, the price GT Real Estate had paid for it several months prior. Another $4 million came in a loan from another affiliate, secured by the debtor’s ownership interest in a nearby golf course.

While Lauria didn’t mention that golf course by name, later discussion in the hearing Monday centered on Waterford Golf Club which a Panthers affiliate bought in March 2020.

When a bankruptcy filing became increasingly likely, Lauria said, more funding was needed. A $3.2 million loan from parent company DT Sports Holding came in to secure and protect the site plus prepare for bankruptcy filing.

“Once it became apparent that the project could not be completed,” Lauria said, “the debtor’s driving objective shifted to navigating towards and orderly windup of the project, and to do so in a fashion that treated the people who had worked on the project fairly.”

Now more than $280 million has been invested in the project, Lauria said. The current best estimate is $55-$90 million of claims incurred related to construction or procurement and fabrication of materials.

“The debtor believes that the aggregate value of its assets is substantially less than the amount it owes to affiliates and third parties,” Lauria said.

GT Real Estate had discussions with the city, county, state and contractor that brought on the one-month standstill that ended June 2. GT Real Estate proposed a non-disclosure agreement to the city and county that would extend the construction hold another month and expand it to include the county, Lauria said.

Lauria said the county instead sent a letter to GT Real Estate on May 31 demanding the return of its $21 contribution. Facing mounting notices and claims, and continued litigation, the debtor decided bankruptcy filing was the best option, Lauria said.

The bankruptcy filing also was the only way to get additional funding, Lauria said, which came via a $20 million loan from DT Sports Holding.

City officials declined to comment last week on the bankruptcy filing.

The project’s future first came into question in March when construction was halted on the 240-acre development in Rock Hill.

Throughout the high-profile disagreement, Rock Hill maintained it met all obligations required under the agreement, and several officials defended the city’s expertise in successfully executing multi-million dollar projects.

“We’re familiar in dealing with these kinds of projects and these sizes of projects, but we need to do it on terms that make sure the city’s financial credit is protected,” City Manager David Vehaun said at a March City Council meeting.

The dispute between Rock Hill and the Panthers centered around the $225 million in bonds.

Vehaun said in March that despite several requests from the Panthers, the city insisted it would not “backstop” — or guarantee — the debt.

And the financial and construction administration agreement between Rock Hill and GT Real Estate outlines just that.

According to the agreement, the city was expected to use its “reasonable best efforts” to issue the $225 million in bonds by Feb. 26, 2021.

The agreement states the city’s “reasonable best efforts” should not be construed as “an assurance or guarantee by the city that there will be a buyer for any of the bonds.”

However, the agreement also states that the city’s failure to use its “reasonable best efforts” to issue the bonds by Feb. 26, 2021, would result in a default. And in March, GT Real Estate issued a 30-day notice of default to Rock Hill.

“On February 26, 2021, the City of Rock Hill became delinquent on their obligation to fund the public infrastructure,” GT Real Estate said in an Alpril statement. “Despite our persistent efforts throughout 2021, the City of Rock Hill failed to issue the bonds or provide the funding for the public infrastructure for the project.”

Despite the disagreement, Vehaun said in March that Rock Hill continued to work for months toward getting the bonds issued.

Vehaun said the city was prepared to issue the bonds in early 2022, but the Panthers asked the city to stop.

“We felt that everybody was on the same page, including the Panthers,” he said.

Which York County roads most need to be fixed? This is how you can make it happen

As road work continues across York County, it’s now time for people to have their say about new projects, or whether they want even more improvements.“I know we’re in the middle of Pennies 4,” said Patrick Hamilton, director of Pennies for Progress, “but Pennies 5 is coming up faster than you think.”Pennies for Progress is a voter-approved one-cent sales tax used to pay for York County’s road improvements, including widening, resurfacing, intersection upgrades and other work, and even n...

As road work continues across York County, it’s now time for people to have their say about new projects, or whether they want even more improvements.

“I know we’re in the middle of Pennies 4,” said Patrick Hamilton, director of Pennies for Progress, “but Pennies 5 is coming up faster than you think.”

Pennies for Progress is a voter-approved one-cent sales tax used to pay for York County’s road improvements, including widening, resurfacing, intersection upgrades and other work, and even new roads. Voters get to decide on a list of upgrades based on how much the tax is expected to generate over a seven-year span.

The tax expires every seven years.

The current tax, known as Pennies 4 and approved by county residents in 2017, expires on April 30, 2025. A fifth Pennies campaign would need to be approved by voters in the fall of 2024 to begin collection May 1, 2025.

“It’s not a new tax,” Hamilton said. “It’ll be a continuation of the existing tax.”

If approved, Pennies 5 would provide millions of dollars for some of the county’s biggest road needs. That list of needs has not yet been created.

“There’s a lot that has to happen prior to that vote,” Hamilton said.

By state law, a six-member citizens commission will pick the Pennies 5 projects. And appointment of the commission is a critical early step.

County officials have not yet decided how people can submit their own names for consideration.

Commission selections are based on population. York County Council gets to appoint three members. Rock Hill appoints two, and there’s one more member for the remaining eight municipalities in York County.

“That has to happen this fall,” Hamilton said.

An estimated timeline has the county approving a resolution to create the commission Sept. 6, and appointing the commission members Oct. 17.

The commission would set its schedule this fall. With the most recent campaign, the group met monthly. The new commission will do it’s work from December to spring of 2024.

“They’ll go to every municipality within the county, give them an opportunity to present project requests to the commission,” Hamilton said. “Meetings are open to the public. The public can come and present project requests. We’ll take project requests through our website.”

The commission should approve its final list in May 2024 and present it to the county that summer. The vote would come that fall.

Chairwoman Christi Cox asked Hamilton to find out if there’s a way people can add their names to the list for consideration as a Pennies commission member. Councilman Tom Audette asked if there might be any update for how the Pennies 5 commission forms.

“Because of the change in our census numbers, have we re-looked at how we allot these six members because of the growth in certain areas?” Audette asked.

Audette serves a high-growth area in and between Fort Mill and Tega Cay. Recent U.S. Census Bureau updates show Fort Mill grew in a year, ending last summer, by more people than all but two other South Carolina cities and towns.

About 54% of York County residents live outside city or town limits. Which hits right at the three of six commission members the county gets to appoint. Rock Hill makes up about 26% of the total York County population. That city gets two appointments, or 33% of the commission.

Fort Mill, Tega Cay, York, Clover, Hickory Grove, McConnells, Sharon and Smyrna combine for about 20% of the county population. Those municipalities combined get one appointment, or 17% of the commission.

“I know it seems like a long way away,” Hamilton said, “but the process starts now.”

Hamilton said it’s a common misconception that York County Council or county staff picks the road improvements list.

That’s the job of the citizens commission.

Once the commission finalizes its list, York County Council can vote only on whether to put it on a referendum ballot. Council can’t change the list.

York County Council members say they’ve heard many of the same misconceptions.

“There’s been some conversations throughout the community about, council picks these projects,” said Councilman William “Bump” Roddey, who serves the Rock Hill area. “Council gets no designation which roads goes on the Pennies list.”

Councilman Robert Winkler hears the same in his area of western York County.

“All we can do is vote it up or down,” Winkler said. “We can’t add if we don’t like the list. We can’t make a change to it.”

Nor can the county manipulate the list after the referendum, for instance, if revenue comes in higher than projected.

“You can’t add new projects once the referendum’s been voted on,” Hamilton said. “If the project is not identified on the referendum, we can’t spend any money on it.”

Revenue collection on the current campaign has been drastically higher than was projected, Hamilton said. And all Pennies 4 projects are slated to be completed on time and on budget. Yet his office continues to monitor inflation, which can have major implications on road work due to massive amounts of materials needed.

Tell us which York County roads you would like to see make Pennies 5 in the box below. Feel free to vote for multiple roads.

Road conditions is a longstanding concern for many in York County. The Pennies program held its first referendum in 1997. Since then, four programs have been approved by county residents with as high as 82% approval.

Roads remain a concern. A recent online reader survey by The Herald asked, given soaring gas prices, whether the state should temporarily cut back its gas tax, even if that money is used to improve state roads. The response was clear: 89% of participants opted to keep the gas tax and have road improvements done on time, despite pain at the pump.

Together, the previous four Pennies campaigns combine for more than $720 million in road work. If Pennies 5 is as big or bigger than Pennies 4 in revenue collection, an approved Pennies 5 campaign could take York County County past the $1 billion mark.

Vote Year: 1997

Vote Result: 51% in favor

Amount: $99.26 million

Key Projects: Fort Mill Northern Bypass (new road), Cherry Road, S.C. 5, S.C. 274, S.C. 160, S.C. 161

Vote Year: 2003

Vote Result: 73% in favor

Amount: $184 million

Key Projects: U.S. 21 Catawba River Bridge, Mt. Gallant Road, Fort Mill Southern Bypass (new road), Tega Cay/Gold Hill Connector (new road), S.C. 55, McConnells Highway

Vote Year: 2011

Vote Result: 82% in favor

Amount: $161 million

Key Projects: I-77/Gold Hill Road (new interchange), S.C. 274/Pole Branch Road, U.S. 21 North, S.C. 160, S.C. 557, Mt. Gallant Road

Vote Year: 2017

Vote Result: 78% in favor

Amount: $277.92 million

Key Projects: Cel-River Road/Red River Road, U.S. 21, S.C. 274/49/557 (intersection), Sutton Road/Spratt Street/Fort Mill Parkway, Galleria Boulevard (extension), Hubert Graham Way (extension)

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