Computer Support in Mount Pleasant SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Mount Pleasant, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Mount Pleasant, SC.

IT Support Mount Pleasant, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Mount Pleasant, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Mount Pleasant, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Mount Pleasant, SC
 Computer Services Mount Pleasant, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Mount Pleasant, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Mount Pleasant, SC
 Cloud Services Mount Pleasant, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Mount Pleasant, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Mount Pleasant, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Mount Pleasant, SC
 Data Security Mount Pleasant, SC

Additional Computer Services In Mount Pleasant, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant voters asked to approve property tax increase for parks, recreation

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed mon...

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.

Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.

The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed money plus interest. When the debt is paid off after 15 years the extra tax would end, according to advocates, although the referendum does not mention a time limit.

The impact on total property tax bills would be much smaller than a 10 percent increase because the town accounts for just a portion of those annual bills and the school district gets the largest share.

Most Town Council members — seven of nine — supported putting the referendum on the ballot and some are actively working to see it passed.

“We’re trying to create something for this generation and the next,” Councilman John Iacofano said. “I think it’s going to be tight, but I think it’s going to pass.”

Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley are opposed.

“In bad economic times, not everyone can afford this,” said Haynie. “I’m out there letting people know why they ought to vote no.”

He said the town should rely on impact fees that apply to new home construction to fund growth-related needs for recreation projects. The most those fees could raise would be $1.68 million yearly by Haynie’s estimate and wouldn’t allow the town to borrow tens of millions to put plans in action.

“If the referendum is successful, we can begin building immediately,” Iacofano and Councilwoman G.M. Whitley wrote, urging support for the ballot question.

Plans for the park site include four large playing fields, tennis and pickleball courts, playgrounds, fishing piers, a disc golf course, trails, volleyball and basketball courts, a performance space and a multipurpose building.

“It will be the Central Park of Mount Pleasant,” then-Mayor Billy Swails said in 2010, when the town and county agreed to spend $20 million to buy the land.

Iacofano said that if the town had raised its property tax then, the town would have a park by now.

“I don’t know that people truly understand how inexpensive our taxes are in Mount Pleasant, considering the services received,” he said.

The referendum would put an estimated $40 million toward building the park. The remaining 20 percent of the money would go to renovations of the Park West pool building, improvements at the Mugsy Kerr tennis complex on Whipple Road, and bike/pedestrian trails. If any money is left, the town could use that to fund green space preservation.

So, just how much would taxes increase if the referendum were to pass?

The impact on any particular taxpayer would vary, because the property tax is based on the assessed value of real estate and vehicles. Even next-door homeowners with identical houses could see very different results, depending when they purchased their homes and what vehicles sit in the driveways.

For an owner-occupant with a house valued at $500,000 for tax purposes, passage of the referendum would mean an extra $80, plus the added tax on any vehicles.

If that same house were a rental property, the extra tax would be $120, because commercial properties are taxed at a 50 percent higher rate. Large businesses would see the greatest tax difference.

The last time the town put a recreation referendum on the ballot, in 2015, it was narrowly defeated. The town has planned to develop the park site since it was purchased in 2010, but has not developed a funding plan.

The town’s property is half the 245-acre site that was jointly purchased with Charleston County Parks and Recreation. The town’s portion is planned for more active recreation, with playing fields, pickleball courts and other amenities.

Some people, including Corley, have come to see the town-owned land as green space that should not be developed. In voting against holding a referendum, Corley expressed concern about the impact on wildlife.

Recreation advocates argue that the town has far too few playing fields to handle the current demand, and say most of the jointly owned site would remain undeveloped in any case.

A group called Vote for Parks — Mount Pleasant has put up a website (voteparks.org) advocating for the referendum. There appears to be no organized opposition, but a big hurdle for supporters will be overcoming the history of town voters opposing property tax increases, including the 2015 park referendum and the 2020 Charleston County affordable housing referendum.

Daniel Brownstein, who ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the statehouse against Joe Bustos in 2020, is representing that group. He said it’s being funded by “local citizens who want to ensure that children and adults have adequate parks and recreational amenities.”

Several Tigers make All-ODAC football team

Hampden-Sydney College (H-SC) placed nine student-athletes on the 2022 All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Football Teams, including four First Team and five Second Team selections, while freshman wide receiver Mason Cunningham of Arlington was picked as the ODAC Rookie of the Year.Earning First Team All-ODAC honors were senior tight end David Byler of Virginia Beach, junior running back Melik Frost of Hardeeville, South Carolina, junior offensive lineman T.J. Minter of Chester and junior defensive back Will ...

Hampden-Sydney College (H-SC) placed nine student-athletes on the 2022 All-Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Football Teams, including four First Team and five Second Team selections, while freshman wide receiver Mason Cunningham of Arlington was picked as the ODAC Rookie of the Year.

Earning First Team All-ODAC honors were senior tight end David Byler of Virginia Beach, junior running back Melik Frost of Hardeeville, South Carolina, junior offensive lineman T.J. Minter of Chester and junior defensive back Will Pickren of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Garnering Second Team All-ODAC accolades were Cunningham, as an all-purpose back, fifth-year quarterback Tanner Bernard of Lynchburg, sophomore wide receiver Austin Fernandez of Warrenton, fifth-year defensive lineman Michael Harris of Ashland and junior defensive back James-Ryan Salvi of Troutville.

Mason Cunningham started seven of 10 games and had 59 receptions for 660 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He ranks second in the ODAC in receptions and receptions per game (5.9), is tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns, and tied for fifth in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (66.0). Mason averaged 5.4 yards on eight punt returns with a long return of 10 yards.

David Byler started all 10 games and had 49 receptions for 547 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He ranks fourth in the ODAC in receptions (47), tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns, fifth in receptions per game (4.9), and seventh in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (54.7). David established a new season record for receptions by a tight end at H-SC with his 49 receptions, and completed his H-SC career with 59 career receptions for 640 yards and seven touchdowns-starting 12 of 27 career games.

Melik Frost started all 10 games and rushed for 943 yards on 201 carries (4.7) and 12 touchdowns, adding 236 yards receiving on 26 receptions and one receiving touchdown. He leads the ODAC in rushing yards and rushing yards per game (94.3), and ranks second in all-purpose yards (1,179), all-purpose yards per game (117.9), rushing touchdowns and total touchdowns (13).

T.J. Minter started all 10 games, anchoring the offensive line from his left tackle position as the Tigers accounted for 4,275 yards of total offense (427.5), including 1,139 yards rushing (113.9) and 3,136 yards passing (313.6) with 44 touchdowns. Minter is now a two-time All-ODAC First Team selection.

Will Pickren started all 10 games at safety and had 123 total tackles, including 48 solo and 75 assisted, 5.0 tackles for loss, two interceptions, three pass breakups, one forced fumble, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick. He leads the ODAC in total tackles and tackles per game, and is tied for sixth in interceptions. He ranks third in Division III in total tackles and tackles per game. Will is a now a three-time All-ODAC First Team selection.

Tanner Bernard, a second-year team captain, started all eight games he played and passed for 2,486 yards (204-311, 65.6%) and 21 touchdowns with four interceptions. He leads the ODAC in passing yards per game (310.8), completions per game (25.5) and total offense (310.2), ranks second in passing yards, passing touchdowns, completion percentage (65.6), passing efficiency (152.52) and passing yards per attempt (8.0), and fourth in passing yards per completion (12.2). He ranks fourth in Division III in passing yards per game and completions per game and eighth in total offense. Tanner is now a three-time All-ODAC selection (First Team in 2021), and completed his H-SC career with 5,965 yards passing and 44 touchdowns, adding 84 yards rushing and five touchdowns for 6,049 yards of total offense-starting 23 of 23 career games.

Austin Fernandez started all 10 games and had 60 receptions for 775 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He leads the ODAC in receptions and receptions per game, is third in receiving yards and receiving yards per game (77.5), and is tied for fourth in receiving touchdowns.

Michael Harris, a team captain, started all nine games he played and had 29 total tackles, including 12 solo and 17 assisted, three tackles for loss, one sack, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick. Michael is a now a two-time All-ODAC selection, and completed his H-SC career with 101 career tackles, including 36 solo and 65 assisted, nine tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, one quarterback hurry and one blocked PAT kick-starting 29 of 33 career games.

James-Ryan Salvi started all 10 games at safety and had 98 total tackles, including 39 solo and 59 assisted, 0.5 tackles for loss, eight pass breakups and one fumble recovery. He ranks third in the ODAC in total tackles and tackles per game, and is tied for fourth in pass breakups.

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Vote on Recreation Referendum approaches, residents divided on tax increase

Mount Pleasant voters will be faced with a choice this November. The Town’s Recreation Referendum will appear on the ballot on Nov. 8. The referendum, if passed, will fund a variety of projects, with a majority of the funds — nearly $40 million — going toward Rifle Range Road Park.Town Council voted 7-2 this summer to allow residents to vote on the referendum on Election Day. Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley voted against the referendum in July. There was much discussion between council members on wha...

Mount Pleasant voters will be faced with a choice this November. The Town’s Recreation Referendum will appear on the ballot on Nov. 8. The referendum, if passed, will fund a variety of projects, with a majority of the funds — nearly $40 million — going toward Rifle Range Road Park.

Town Council voted 7-2 this summer to allow residents to vote on the referendum on Election Day. Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley voted against the referendum in July. There was much discussion between council members on what projects the $50 million referendum should fund.

In the end, it was decided that the referendum will fund the development of Rifle Range Road Park, which will see rectangular fields, a performance area, a gymnasium and pickleball courts on the 245-acre property. Over 150 acres of the property will be preserved for passive park use, as well.

The remaining funds will go towards the Park West indoor pool renovation, the expansion of the Mugsy Kerr Tennis Complex on Whipple Road and the formation of Mount Pleasant Way paths. The referendum will also fund the acquisition and preservation of land and greenspace and the operation and maintenance of the new facilities.

However, some residents question if Mount Pleasant even needs another park.

A Facebook group called “Save the Park Mt. Pleasant” was created earlier this year and includes public posts from residents who are ready to vote against the referendum. Many users share the sentiment that Rifle Range Road Park should remain a greenspace, and feel that the current recreational amenities are underutilized as is.

“The referendum is overkill both literally and figuratively. If facilities are truly needed, wait until the Town has the funding and build elsewhere,” Mount Pleasant resident Therese Kristiansen said. “Residents have documented fields, courts and program rooms sitting empty. There is no data to warrant the referendum.”

Daniel Brownstein began Vote for Parks, a citizen’s group that advocates for the passage of the referendum. Brownstein is a father of two young children and said that he feels the referendum will give the community more recreational opportunities beyond the ones that currently exist.

“I have a 10-year-old son and a 9-year-old daughter and between them, they’ve pretty much played every sport and done every recreational activity imaginable,” Brownstein said. “They’re very active and so I’ve always been passionate about making sure that kids have the activities and the athletics that they need to develop into successful, productive adults.”

The last park constructed in Mount Pleasant was Carolina Park, a multi-phase recreational complex that first opened in 2011. Brownstein hopes that adding a new park in town will allow the recreation department to accommodate more activities for more families.

“I know that from my experience with youth sports and recreational programs that there really is a stress on our existing facilities. There’s not enough of them,” Brownstein said. “This problem is only going to get worse as Mount Pleasant grows unless we build or advocate for facilities required for the population.”

If passed, residents would pay an increased property tax for up to 15 years. For a tax-assessed home with an appraised value of $500,000, this would be roughly $80 a year. Perry Rourk, who serves on the Town’s Recreation Advisory Commission, said that the money the town would receive from the referendum would be guaranteed to fund the projects listed.

“I know most people look at it as a tax increase, but at least as a tax increase it’s guaranteed where the money is going to be used and it’s guaranteed to automatically end at the end of the bond term,” Rourk said.

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Signed, sealed, delivered: Mount Pleasant athletes participate in Signing Day

Student athletes at Wando, Lucy Beckham, Bishop England and Oceanside Collegiate Academy, surrounded by family, friends and coaches, participated in Early National Signing Day on Nov. 9. Thirty-three East Cooper high school seniors signed their letters of intent to begin their journey into college athletics.Wando High School had nine student athletes sign their letters of intent to play college sports.“We’re very excited to have nine seniors who are getting the opportunity to compete at the collegiate level. This is...

Student athletes at Wando, Lucy Beckham, Bishop England and Oceanside Collegiate Academy, surrounded by family, friends and coaches, participated in Early National Signing Day on Nov. 9. Thirty-three East Cooper high school seniors signed their letters of intent to begin their journey into college athletics.

Wando High School had nine student athletes sign their letters of intent to play college sports.

“We’re very excited to have nine seniors who are getting the opportunity to compete at the collegiate level. This is a testament to their hard work and effort and their involvement with our athletic programs and, of course, the programs that they’re involved with all year round,” said Wando Athletic Director Mark Buchman.

Baseball

Ryder Manale — Coastal Carolina University

Boys Lacrosse

Garrett Mayer — Rhodes College

Girls Lacrosse

Kelsey Bennett — Florida Southern University

Delaney Harrison — Newberry College

Softball

Alyssa Boris — Brevard College

Samantha Bumgarner — Lander University

Ava Crawford — Southern Wesleyan University

Caroline Holmes — Coker University

Track and Field

Julia Galbally — Clemson University

Lucy Beckham celebrated its first signing day in the school’s history. Five seniors signed their letters of intent at a large ceremony in the school’s gym, including Lacrosse player Anne Edens, who is the first Beckham athlete to commit to a Division I school.

“Athletes, we’re super proud of you. We’re proud of all your hard work and what you’ve done for Lucy Beckham in setting the tone for the rest of the student body,” Lucy Beckham Athletic Director Scott McInnes said to the athletes. “This place is a very special place for us. We’re about love. We truly love our athletes.”

Boys Lacrosse

Charlie Broucqsault — Lander University

Conner Coombs — Wingate University

Baker Hollingsworth — Limestone College

Girls Lacrosse

Anne Edens — Villanova University

Girls Tennis

Piper Charney — University of Michigan

Five seniors at Bishop England High School signed their letters of intent on Nov. 9.

“Bishop England is very proud of our student-athletics who are getting a chance to further their athletic career at the next level. These athletes have shown that they have what it takes to be successful on and out the field of play. As [athletic director], I am proud of their achievements and the hard work of their coaches and support of their parents,” said Bishop England Athletic Director Paul Runey.

Boys Lacrosse

Riley Finlayson — Centre College

Girls Lacrosse

Evelyn Kitchin — Coastal Carolina University

Leslie Wysong — Merchant Marine Academy

Golf

Sam McMillan — Anderson University

Luke Walmat — College of William and Mary

Oceanside Collegiate Academy celebrated 13 student athletes who committed to playing their respective sports at colleges and across the nation.

“We are very proud of these 13 student athletes that have worked so hard in the classroom and on the field, court, pool to achieve the lofty goal of continuing to play their sport at the collegiate level,” Oceanside Athletic Director Mark Meyer said in a statement.

Baseball

Andrew Bowers — Coastal Carolina University

Chase Jarnagin — College of Charleston

Cameron Sebuck — Coastal Carolina University

Jackson Sobel — Georgia Tech

Tagger Tyson — University of Louisville

Girls Lacrosse

Maddy Mayer — Winthrop University

Sage Adams — Lynn University

Alexis Manini — West Virginia Wesleyan College

Golf

William Lutz — Winthrop University

Waymon Thomas — College of Charleston

Rowing

Caroline Hill — Clemson University

Swim

Landon Duffie — Converse College

Tennis

Garrett Brooker — St. Michael’s College

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Fall Garden Tour to showcase Mount Pleasant neighborhoods

Private gardens hold a bit of mystery to them. A secret that is hidden behind a home off a residential street or tucked beyond iron gates — each with a certain niche, unique design or special purpose. The Charleston Horticultural Society is giving guests the opportunity to experience ten private gardens in Olde Park and I’On neighborhoods during the 21st annual Fall Garden Tour.“It’s a great way for average people to come and see private gardens that you don’t normally get to see,” said Claudia McNa...

Private gardens hold a bit of mystery to them. A secret that is hidden behind a home off a residential street or tucked beyond iron gates — each with a certain niche, unique design or special purpose. The Charleston Horticultural Society is giving guests the opportunity to experience ten private gardens in Olde Park and I’On neighborhoods during the 21st annual Fall Garden Tour.

“It’s a great way for average people to come and see private gardens that you don’t normally get to see,” said Claudia McNab, a landscape designer and the chairman of the Fall Garden Tour.

The self-guided tour on Nov. 6 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. presents four private gardens in Olde Park and six in I’On, plus the community garden in I’On. At each garden on the tour, knowledgeable CHS Hort trained docents will be available to answer questions and point out important details in each special garden.

Some of the private gardens featured on the tour are strictly maintained by the homeowner, while others are designs of landscape companies. Each garden on the tour highlights something different — one is maintained by a naturalist gardener who focuses on native plants, two gardens are on the river and there’s a mix of grand gardens and small gardens. Some gardeners are Lowcountry natives, while others are from different regions and learned to adapt to a different climate.

Olde Park resident Susan Marus designs and maintains her private garden that will be featured on the tour. Since moving to her home 20 years ago, she has transformed her ordinary backyard into a garden oasis that boasts 27 different varieties of ferns and several Japanese maple trees. She said her garden has changed a lot over the years, especially as more shade has come in from the towering oak trees.

“This is an evolution of borrowed ideas and knowledge that I gained,” said Marus, who is also a longtime CHS Hort member.

Marus has refined her green thumb by taking workshops and classes through CHS Hort, including the docent training class, which is the most in-depth course on the Lowcountry’s horticulture heritage. CHS Hort classes range from beginner gardeners to expert-level training.

Some aspects of Marus’ garden share a story — there’s a section of artificial turf underneath a swing so her grandkids can play and the Japanese maple trees started as a precious gift from a friend who is no longer around. Lucile MacLennan, a horticulturist in Charleston, died last year a few months after her 101st birthday. However, she left her legacy in private gardens across the Lowcountry, including Marus’. During garden tours, MacLennan saved eggshells from her morning breakfast and placed a small seedling in each shell to give guests, said Marus. Some of those special seedlings are now planted in Marus’ garden.

Just like all gardeners, Marus has had her fair share of trial and error, but a lot of gardening is learning on the job. A job that leaves her with dirt under her fingernails, but produces a nature haven steps away from her back door.

Each fall, CHS Hort highlights a different area of the Lowcountry for the Fall Garden Tour. Past tours included Hampton Park in downtown Charleston, Sullivan’s Island and Daniel Island. CHS Hort chose Olde Park and I’On for the tour because of the variety of gardens — Olde Park features larger lots with more yard space compared to I’On’s smaller landscapes.

Fall Garden Tour tickets are $50 for CHS Hort Members and $60 for non-members and may be purchased online at www.chashortsoc.org/hort-store/p/2022falltour. Wristbands and brochures will be available for pickup at the CHS Hort office at 46 Windermere Blvd. on Nov. 3 and 4 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. or at O’Quinn School at 761 S. Shelmore Blvd. on the day of the tour starting at 10:15 a.m.

Day of ticket sales will also be available at O’Quinn School from 10:15 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. There is parking available at O’Quinn and the walk to all gardens is two miles. Guests may also park at marked street parking in the neighborhoods if they do not wish to walk.

The tour is sponsored by local businesses including Community Table and William Means Real Estate in I’On Village, Moultrie News and App Springs Water.

CHS Hort has events, workshops, classes, plant sales and volunteer opportunities throughout the year. Stay up to date with CHS Hort by visiting www.chashortsoc.org.

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