Computer Support in Johns Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company’s IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in – we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Johns Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Johns Island, SC.

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And when we say “full range of computer support,” we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Johns Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS’ fully managed computer support in Johns Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don’t have to build an in-house solution. We’re talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS’ CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses’ growth.

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IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS’ Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We’ll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Johns Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don’t plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn’t have to be with ITS by your side.

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Cloud Computer Services in Charleston

Cloud Computer Services In Johns Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS’ Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS’ sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Johns Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company’s antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best – keeping your customers satisfied.

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Additional Computer Services in Charleston

Additional Computer Services In Johns Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don’t see a solution to your problem on this page, don’t fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won’t be talking to someone at a call center. You won’t be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don’t see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Johns Island

New taxing district aims to boost Johns Island infrastructure funds

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said...

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.

Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.

“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said. “I just hope it doesn’t have as much of a negative impact on our residents as we might expect.”

The farm has been in his family since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations on Johns Island.

“Its not until you move away that you see everything people go through to attain what my family already has,” Hammond said.

From 2010 to 2020, census data shows the island’s population within Charleston city limits doubled from nearly 5,300 residents to almost 12,000.

A new taxing district established by the city of Charleston aims to use funding from the island’s commercial and residential growth to help ease its growing pains like lagging road and drainage infrastructure.

The district, approved by City Council Oct. 12, places a tax on new development on the part of the island that falls within Charleston city limits to help fund municipal projects. It doesn’t apply to any existing developments or developments that were in the permitting process at the time of the council vote.

“Folks view development on the island as coming before the infrastructure,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

At one point, City Council considered a six-month moratorium on new housing on Johns Island proposed by Mayor John Tecklenburg. He advocated for the proposal as a way for the city to catch up on long-needed infrastructure improvements. After a mixed response, the 2018 proposal failed.

Over its 30-year lifespan, the newly approved taxing district, known as a Municipal Improvement District or MID, is projected to generate $60 million of additional revenue specifically for Johns Island, consultants hired by the city estimate. Developers will pay $480 per year per new apartment unit or single-family home. New individual single-family homes that are not part of subdivision will only be subject to the $480 per year tax if they are on properties over 2-acres. New commercial business owners will pay an equivalent tax based on the size of the property. A 10,000-square-foot commercial space would pay about $2,600 per year, city planning department officials estimate. The tax will increase by 2 percent each year.

As a lifelong resident of the island and new business owner, Estuary Beans & Barley brewery owner Scott Harrison said he is concerned about the potential burden the MID may place on new businesses. His brewery on Meek’s Farm Road is located on the same lot as the new Charleston Distilling, which relocated from King Street in November.

“It takes a long time to open up a business here and it takes a long time to get the approvals,” he said. “I am sure things at the city are backed up, but especially with COVID-19, time is important.”

Harrison opened his brewery in 2020, so he won’t be subject to the new tax, but he wants the city to encourage new development as long as it respects the island’s agricultural roots.

“We have a farm-to-table kind of feel out here that Johns Island has always been known for,” he said. “On the one hand, I would hate to see the farms go away, but it would be nice if city planning helped growth happen the way it does in the rest of Charleston.”

Charleston County’s Urban Growth Boundary limits dense development on much of the island outside of Charleston city limits, which has helped preserve farmland in the area.

Zlogar, the Johns Island task force chair, said he could see the MID benefiting efforts to balance urban development and rural preservation. With new funding sources, the city could buy land for park space or conservation areas to create a buffer between the urban growth boundary and the rest of the island where more development will take place.

“It’s all about community, how do you use these funds to bring the community together,” he said.

Along with the Johns Island Task Force, other community groups have endorsed the MID, including the Johns Island Council and the Johns Island Community Association.

Councilman Karl Brady Jr., who represents Charleston’s portion of Johns Island, said he pursued the MID designation because many proposed improvements on the island struggle to receive sufficient funding.

“Improvements are coming, but I’m sure it’s not as fast as some people would like,” Brady said. “This will give us the ability to do some homegrown improvements like the Johns Island Park expansion and road and infrastructure projects.”

Johns Island is the first area of the city to get a MID, mainly because it has the most potential for new development, Charleston Planning Director Robert Summerfield said.

“Johns Island has quite a bit of future development, unlike West Ashley or the peninsula where most of the development will be redevelopment,” he said.

The district will likely not create significant revenue for at least three years, Summerfield said. However, once revenue is generated, the city may be able issue bonds with it to jumpstart its use.

Transportation improvements in particular are crucial, said Michael Johnson, president of the Headquarters Island Property Owners Association on Johns Island. Johnson grew up on Johns Island and returned after stints in Houston and New Orleans.

“Charleston has become one of the most unsustainable places I’ve visited in a long time,” he said. “The traffic is horrendous.”

Not all proposed road projects are popular. An ongoing plan to extend Interstate 526 from West Ashley through James and Johns Island is seen by some as a threat to Johns Island’s Gullah-Geechee heritage. That plan is largely funded by the S.C. Department of Transportation and Charleston County and will not likely be impacted by the MID.

Residents of Johns Island are likely years away from seeing improvements funded with MID dollars, but the development will continue.

Commentary: Make I-526 from Johns to James island a buses-only highway

The S.C. Department of Transportation has released detailed information about the planned Interstate 526 extension, and everybody who wants to be in the discussion should first study it. When I learned that Johns Island is expected to triple its population between 2015 and 2050, my initially favorable view of this project changed.The highway extension by itself is only a partial solution. Once built, it would trigger the widening of roads all over the area. The monetary and environmental costs of those roads appear nowhere in the othe...

The S.C. Department of Transportation has released detailed information about the planned Interstate 526 extension, and everybody who wants to be in the discussion should first study it. When I learned that Johns Island is expected to triple its population between 2015 and 2050, my initially favorable view of this project changed.

The highway extension by itself is only a partial solution. Once built, it would trigger the widening of roads all over the area. The monetary and environmental costs of those roads appear nowhere in the otherwise diligent impact study. We have arrived at a waypoint where we must question uncontrolled growth based on car traffic and become serious about public transportation.

The region has made a promising start with the Lowcountry Rapid Transit project. However, the low densities on James and Johns islands call for a different concept: multiple lines of smaller buses branching out into these islands. But how can these buses get there without being stuck in car traffic? The I-526 extension presents a one-time chance to achieve this through these steps:

• Build the I-526 extension as proposed in Alternative G with four lanes between West Ashley and Johns Island. This section of the highway is badly needed to connect Johns Island with destinations north and would reduce congestion on Main Road and Maybank Highway on James Island.

• Continue the extension to James Island and S.C. 30 as a two-lane bus road, accompanied by a bike and pedestrian path. If this section is built for car traffic, it will have a disproportionate impact on neighborhoods and the James Island County Park while bringing ever more cars into the city where parking is already scarce. As a green corridor, serving electric buses and bikers, it would be quiet and improve access to the park.

• Make future development on the islands conditional on improving bus service. Establish small park-and-ride lots where the bus lines connect to developments. As bus traffic increases, reserve two lanes on I-526 and S.C. 30 for “green” traffic.

In its study for the I-526 extension, the Department of Transportation does not mention buses or public transportation. This is the mindset of the 1970s, when road planning destroyed the urban fabric of cities and made them dependent on individual car traffic.

Perpetuated today, it is an astonishing denial of the challenges that are posed by climate change. It also constitutes social injustice toward residents on the islands who cannot drive cars because of their age or lack of monetary means.

Electric cars will not reduce congestion. Autonomous cars will increase demand and make it much worse. Future development on the islands is acceptable only if a significant amount of commuting can be served by public transportation. The I-526 extension offers a unique chance to do so.

Reinhold Roedig of Wadmalaw Island is a retired city planner from Germany who specialized in urban renewal.

Charleston Co. School asking for public input on new Johns Island elementary

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School District is holding two community input meetings to update Johns Island residents on plans for a new school on Johns Island.The first meeting is from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Mt. Zion Elementary. The second meeting is schedule for the same times Thursday at Angel Oak Elementary.Charleston County School District COO Jeff Borowy says the main topic of the presentation and discussion will be the location of a new school.Borowy says the referendum for a new Johns Is...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Charleston County School District is holding two community input meetings to update Johns Island residents on plans for a new school on Johns Island.

The first meeting is from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Mt. Zion Elementary. The second meeting is schedule for the same times Thursday at Angel Oak Elementary.

Charleston County School District COO Jeff Borowy says the main topic of the presentation and discussion will be the location of a new school.

Borowy says the referendum for a new Johns Island elementary school was passed by Charleston County tax payers in November of last year. He says they have not determined a location for the new school yet, but hope to have it identified by the end of this year.

Johns Island community input will be considered in the board of trustee’s final decision and Borowy says Angel Oak Elementary and Mt. Zion Elementary families will be impacted by rezoning when the new school comes. That’s why Borowy says these families’ feedback is so important.

Borowy says there are overcrowding issues at both Mt. Zion and Angel Oak. He says at Angel Oak, they’ve had to bring in eight trailer classrooms.

“Parents have to say, ‘hey look, as an example, you know, I’m zoned to Angel Oak. Is there an opportunity for me to be zoned to this new school?’ You know, or I would rather stay in the zone of Angel Oak?” Borowy said. “They’ll have an opportunity to provide that input as well as look at what the potential impact would be on commuting distances, how that might positively help them, or they might want to stay where they’re at.”

Borowy expects about 600 students will move to the new Johns Island elementary school when it opens in a few years.

“There’s nothing as satisfying as being at school on the first day when we open a new building,” Borowy said. “To see kids have a bigger classroom, see kids have brand new everything. Both them and the teachers in that school, it’s just a refreshing feeling, it’s a recharge for everybody, and it really makes a huge difference in attitudes and desire to be in school when you’ve got something like that.”

Borowy says a video of the meeting will be uploaded online, and parents can email questions as well. He plans to post all comments on the school district website after the meetings.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Commentary: How Oakville success helps preserve Johns Island’s rural heritage

Traveling along Maybank Highway on Johns Island may evoke the sense that rampant development has overrun this storied sea island. But a short detour along River Road or Bohicket Road gives a completely different impression. It quickly becomes obvious that Johns Island is still a place rich with culture and history — with rural communities, farms and forests, and oak-canopied byways all serving as powerful testament to the persistence of a unique people and a beautiful working landscape.In fact, about 80% of Johns Island is still...

Traveling along Maybank Highway on Johns Island may evoke the sense that rampant development has overrun this storied sea island. But a short detour along River Road or Bohicket Road gives a completely different impression. It quickly becomes obvious that Johns Island is still a place rich with culture and history — with rural communities, farms and forests, and oak-canopied byways all serving as powerful testament to the persistence of a unique people and a beautiful working landscape.

In fact, about 80% of Johns Island is still rural. It is this Johns Island that constitutes the vast majority of the island’s acreage, and that holds the promise of a rural heritage that will endure into the future.

There is a reason most of the island remains rural. In 2000, Charleston County enacted agricultural zoning on large farm and forest properties below Plow Ground Road and thus protected about half of the acreage from suburban development. This new zoning also stabilized the traditional African American settlement communities. Finally, in part due to funds made available by the Charleston County Greenbelt Program, 3,365 acres have been protected.

But this future is only partially secure. Zoning can be changed. Urban infrastructure driving suburban sprawl development can be extended. Despite more than two decades of hard work by the county, Johns Island landowners and the local community, the landscape could be lost in the blink of an eye. Now, however, thanks to an inspiring partnership between commerce, conservation, the city of Charleston, the S.C. Conservation Bank and Charleston County, the future of Johns Island looks increasingly bright.

To appreciate this latest conservation accomplishment-in-the-making, it is important to understand that the greatest risk to rural Johns Island is the conversion of land along the Urban Growth Boundary, adjacent to the Charleston Executive Airport. Here, a parcel called Oakville was marked for development.

Although this 95-acre property is on the “growth” side of the boundary, it is totally unsuited for development. Positioned at the mouth of Burden Creek, the entire parcel is only a few feet above sea level. Despite extensive discussion about the perils of developing flood-prone areas and vocal community opposition, outdated zoning laws allowed for the construction of 200 to 400 houses.

Additionally, the parcel’s location adjacent to the airport increased the risk of fatal plane accidents. Further, undoubtedly residents would be consistently disturbed by low-flying planes, creating an inevitable conflict between homeowners and the airport.

It was this concern that the conservation partners brought to the Charleston County Aviation Authority. The partners — including the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, the Coastal Conservation League, the Johns Island Task Force, the Lowcountry Land Trust and the Open Space Institute — found common interest with the Aviation Authority in protecting Oakville from development.

The Aviation Authority recognized the critical importance of ensuring safety for future airport activity, along with the additional resilience benefit — in keeping with the Dutch Dialogues recommendations — of avoiding development on low-lying land. Further, conserving the open space along the edge of the Urban Growth Boundary helps stabilize traditional rural communities by preventing suburban sprawl and the associated increase in taxes and service fees. This unique partnership culminated in the Aviation Authority purchasing Oakville in late July for $7.7 million.

With Oakville out of the developer’s hands, the last step in the process is ensuring the property’s permanent protection. To that end, the S.C. Conservation Bank recently voted to help fund the purchase of a conservation easement. And on Tuesday, Charleston City Council unanimously voted to support funding the project through the Charleston County Greenbelt Program in its upcoming cycle.

Once completed, Oakville will be a great achievement and the first step toward establishing a permanent greenbelt on Johns Island. It illustrates what can be done when a wide array of community members, organizations and public entities work together toward a common future. This is important because much land still remains to be preserved on Johns Island. It will take hard work over the coming years, but we should all take heart that we have the institutions, the financial resources and, most importantly, the people to rise to the challenge.

Michelle Sinkler is the special projects manager with the Open Space Institute. This column was submitted by the institute, the Center for Heirs’ Property Preservation, the Coastal Conservation League, the Johns Island Task Force and the Lowcountry Land Trust.

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Johns Island welcomes California luxury hotel company

Charleston remains a popular destination, and the city’s expanding luxury hotel scene reflects that trend.California-based Auberge Resorts Collection plans to debut its first planned luxury hotel in South Carolina come 2024 in the form of The Dunlin, located within the Kiawah River master-planned community on Johns Island.In partnership with real estate developer ...

Charleston remains a popular destination, and the city’s expanding luxury hotel scene reflects that trend.

California-based Auberge Resorts Collection plans to debut its first planned luxury hotel in South Carolina come 2024 in the form of The Dunlin, located within the Kiawah River master-planned community on Johns Island.

In partnership with real estate developer The Beach Co. and private investment and management company McNair Interests, the project is set to have a January groundbreaking.

“The Dunlin will offer an unforgettable escape where guests can immerse themselves in the pristine natural setting of Johns Island and the culturally rich attractions of Charleston,” Auberge Chairman Dan Friedkin said in a statement.

The Dunlin property will include 72 cottage-style guest rooms and suites and 19 villas, as well as a main lodge and porch, great rooms and a library lounge. Amenities encompass a pool with cabanas, full-service spa, community farmstead, and access to the community’s Spring House riverfront swim and fitness facilities.

A riverfront restaurant with outdoor deck will also be available, as will two event spaces, including a 10,000-square-foot indoor-outdoor event hall.

“We are pleased to partner with Auberge Resorts Collection to create The Dunlin, which will be one of the most remarkable new resorts in the country,” Beach Co. CEO John Darby said. “Auberge has a terrific track record of creating the most unique hospitality experiences in the world, and this endeavor’s intimate setting will bring highly personalized service with a coastal experience inspired by the local environment.”

Built into the Kiawah River community, which puts emphasis in natural surrounding elements, The Dunlin will consist of 2,000 acres of land with 20 miles of riverfront nature trails and marshlands. Guests will be able to participate in nature excursions on the property, including fly fishing, crabbing and boating, as well as paddle boarding, hiking and biking.

Architect Robert Glazier was chosen to design the resort, and Amanda Lindroth of Lindroth Design will lead the interior design of the property.

Construction financing was provided by United Bank’s Charleston offices.

Auberge Resorts Collection has 22 other hotels and resorts across the globe, recently winning accolades from Travel & Leisure’s 2021 World’s Best and Conde Nast’s 2021 Readers’ Choice awards.

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