Computer Support in James Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in James Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in James Island, SC.

IT Support James Island, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in James Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in James Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services James Island, SC
 Computer Services James Island, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in James Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services James Island, SC
 Cloud Services James Island, SC

Cloud Computer Services In James Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in James Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity James Island, SC
 Data Security James Island, SC

Additional Computer Services In James Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in James Island, SC

James Island Board of Zoning and Appeals to discuss KFC drive-thru

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The James Island Board of Zoning and Appeals will meet Tuesday night to discuss bringing a fast-food chain to the area.On the agenda, members are expected to review a request from KFC for a special exception, which will allow them to build a drive-thru in a vacant lot near the intersections of Camp and Folly Roads at 890 Folly Road.This vacant lot sits next to the Chase Bank, Hyams Garden Center and Accent Store near the intersection of Camp and Folly Roads.A recent initiative, “...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The James Island Board of Zoning and Appeals will meet Tuesday night to discuss bringing a fast-food chain to the area.

On the agenda, members are expected to review a request from KFC for a special exception, which will allow them to build a drive-thru in a vacant lot near the intersections of Camp and Folly Roads at 890 Folly Road.

This vacant lot sits next to the Chase Bank, Hyams Garden Center and Accent Store near the intersection of Camp and Folly Roads.

A recent initiative, “Rethink Folly Road,” aims to make the area less congested and commercial and to have more green space. It appears some locals are concerned about the level of traffic and congestion in the area already and are worried a drive-thru near this intersection could make the problem worse.

One resident, who works at the store next to the vacant lot, said he is less concerned by the traffic and more concerned by the type of business that fills the vacancy. He said he would prefer a locally owned business, rather than a chain restaurant.

“I feel that there should be a local business right there, rather than a fast-food chain, I work right there next to a locally owned business and it’s just kind of seems more appropriate for James Island,” Benjamin Pippins said.

According to the meeting agenda, this lot was once home to a Pizza Hut, Subway, Papa John’s and more. Those locations have since been demolished.

The Mayor of James Island, Mayor Woolsey, said he trusts the Board of Zoning Appeals to determine whether the drive-thru will impact traffic.

“There are over 100 businesses in the Town’s Commercial Core and less than five percent are fast-food restaurants. Consistent with the Rethink Folly Road plan, I strongly support the redevelopment of our older strip malls that do not meet current standards,” Mayor Woolsey said in an email.

KFC said in a statement that the James Island Community historically features a variety of food options, including a KFC that operated until 2011.

“We are excited around plans to open a KFC location in the James Island community. Our commitment is to positively impact every community in which we operate by creating job opportunities and participating in community programs and events. The restaurant we are proposing would be uniquely designed for James Island. We are continuing to work with the local community during the review process,” a KFC Spokesperson said in their statement.

The meeting is Tuesday at 7 p.m. and will be available virtually. For more information about the meeting, click here.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Hot SC summer job market gets a lukewarm response as fewer youth apply

The cool, crisp water, still and clear, sits like a beacon, calling residents sweltering from the South Carolina summer heat to break the surface with a resounding splash.But not on Mondays and Tuesdays at some of the Charleston area’s community pools.At Splash Zone Waterpark in James Island County Park you can ride down the 200-foot-long slides and relax in the leisure pool, but there will be no lazying down the river.That attraction won’t open this season, and the park cut admission to reflect the closure....

The cool, crisp water, still and clear, sits like a beacon, calling residents sweltering from the South Carolina summer heat to break the surface with a resounding splash.

But not on Mondays and Tuesdays at some of the Charleston area’s community pools.

At Splash Zone Waterpark in James Island County Park you can ride down the 200-foot-long slides and relax in the leisure pool, but there will be no lazying down the river.

That attraction won’t open this season, and the park cut admission to reflect the closure.

And if you were looking for a more thrilling ride, you won’t get it at Splash Island waterpark at Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park.

That too was closed because the park system doesn’t have enough lifeguards to keep swimmers safe.

About a third of public pools across the U.S. can’t find enough lifeguards, leading some to reduce hours or close altogether, the American Lifeguard Association said.

Charleston area pools are among them.

Despite increased recruitment efforts this year, the Charleston County Parks and Recreation office said in a press release that some facilities have remained impacted by the current labor climate.

“We have experienced a shortage of lifeguards this year,” said Sarah Reynolds, public information coordinator for county parks.

It has mainly affected two waterparks — Splash Island, which has cut back from seven days a week in previous summers to four days a week this year, Wednesday through Saturday, and Splash Zone on James Island. That park is open only five out of seven days, from Wednesday to Sunday.

While apartment and private pools can operate without a lifeguard, simply warning bathers to “swim at their own risk,” pools run by towns and municipalities must ensure the safety of their swimmers and be amply manned by lifeguards.

Charleston public pools follow national lifeguarding standards, including those set forth by the Starfish Aquatics Institute, which requires a specific number of certified lifeguards on duty at all times.

“We have been fortunate with our other parks,” Reynolds said. Whirlin’ Waters in North Charleston and the beach parks are open with lifeguards and haven’t changed operations.

At the four Charleston city pools — one 50-meter open year-round, one water-heated pool available nine months out of the year, and two summer-only facilities — the ability to shift qualified staff members allowed them to remain open and mostly unaffected.

“We have to remain fluid,” Laurie Yarbrough, Department of Recreation director, said.

The city onboards 28 seasonal lifeguards for full-time and part-time positions in a typical summer to meet requirements.

This season “we have identified candidates, but at last count, we had 24 people in slots,” Yarbrough said.

The city is counting on 25 year-round aquatics employees and qualified part-time workers — it hired 10 water safety instructors but has openings for seven more — to fill the gaps.

“Yesterday, we had a lifeguard call out for illness, and another guard got sick during the day, so we had to close at 6 p.m. because we had no one to pull,” Yarbrough said.

The pools typically close at 8 p.m.

Addressing the issue

For the second year, the city of Charleston offered $200 sign-on bonuses for lifeguards who start and finish the season to encourage applications. It also pays anywhere from $100 to $200 for candidates to complete the training and certification program.

And the wage the city pays 16- to 20-year-old lifeguards is competitive at about $14 an hour.

Yarbrough said the industry is trying to alleviate the nationwide lifeguard shortage, changing the training and certification process and reducing costs by creating a hybrid system allowing for in-pool and computer instruction.

Yet Charleston remains among the other areas nationwide experiencing the shortage that began around COVID when pools didn’t open and couldn’t run instructor-based classes.

“We lost a whole cycle of training,” Yarbrough said. “I suspect this labor shortage won’t go away any time soon, especially in public settings like Charleston, where there are vacancies across the spectrum of summer positions.”

Broader hiring problem

Yarbrough pointed to Charleston’s 40 vacancies in jobs from recreational leaders to food services.

South Carolina’s job market swells in the summer, opening the door to employment for the state’s youngest work-age residents through various seasonal programs.

During the hottest months, employers count on augmenting the workforce to fill jobs at water parks, theme parks, museums and aquariums, said Dan Ellzey, director of the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce.

There is no better time than summer break for South Carolina youth to gain work experience and learn the soft skills to help them succeed in their future careers.

But this year, these traditional summer employers are reporting fewer applicants for open positions as hiring got underway.

Charleston County Parks had positions open for park attendants, camp counselors, maintenance attendants, administration, recreation program attendants and aides, in addition to the openings for lifeguards and water instructors.

After receiving 695 applications from qualified candidates, only 80 percent of the openings are staffed for the season, said Kristen Watson, human resources coordinator. In previous years, she added, those same positions were typically 100 percent filled.

Fewer candidates applied for summer jobs at Dorchester County parks. They had 28 applicants and hired 15 qualified workers. That left positions open for part-time attendants and operations aides, said Michelle Mills, Dorchester County’s public information officer.

Paul Nunez, director of team development and culture at the South Carolina Aquarium, said, “the application process is in full swing” but added that “filling positions has been a bit challenging over the last couple of years.”

The lack of applicants for summer positions underscores a chronic, broader-based employment issue for the Palmetto State.

“While the overall job market in South Carolina is extremely strong, we have a relatively low labor force participation rate,” said Bryan Grady, DEW’s labor market information director.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 189,000 jobs adjusted for seasonality were open in South Carolina as of March. When seasonal jobs are added to the mix, it poses a challenge this year due to the much-needed demand for help in industries such as leisure and hospitality that were upended over the past two years by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hospitality sector includes a broad category of fields within the service industry, such as lodging, food services, event planning, theme parks, transportation, and other tourism-oriented products and services.

State numbers, adjusted for seasonality, showed an increase of 12,400 jobs added in all sectors from April to May. There were 4,000 jobs added in Leisure and Hospitality, 22,600 more positions than a year earlier.

Employers count on younger workers aged 14 to 21 to help fill positions open during the more active summer tourist season. But the number of most sought after workers aged 16 to 19, isn’t close to peak levels.

In April, Federal Reserve data show nationwide that 36.6 percent of 16-to-19-year-olds participated in the workforce. That was a big increase from the 34.7 percent average between 2010 and 2020 but nowhere near the 51.2 percent average between 1962 and 1980.

State figures are not available.

Researchers at Pew Research Center suggest multiple reasons for a reduction in teen labor force participation: fewer low-skill, entry-level jobs, more schools ending later in June or restarting before Labor Day, more students enrolled in high school or college over the summer, more teens doing volunteer community service, and more students taking unpaid internships, which the Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn’t count as being employed.

Recreational programs are also a factor for potential workers from 14 to 18.

Noah Seguer, 15, of Summerville, said, “I’m too busy with baseball.”

At the end of the day, these types of labor shortages have a big effect on our city and our residents, Yarbrough said.

“These young workers are looking for a job where they can make the most money, a good competitive wage, and a great place to work.”

Yarbrough said the lack of training programs and higher wages in other industries struggling to build a seasonal workforce likely contributed to the lifeguard shortage.

“In our case, we have to train a new generation,” she said.

James Island Yacht Club Regatta ‘fantastic’ in return to normalcy over weekend

After being limited to just one day of sailing last June, the James Island Yacht Club regatta was able to get in two days of action over the Father’s Day weekend.The event was not without a slight hiccup as poor winds shortened the racing on Saturday afternoon, but the show did go on and the regatta was able to bounce back from having abbreviated festivities in 2020 (due to COVID) and the one-day of racing last year.More than 100 sailors participated in the 2022 regatta sailed in Charleston Harbor. Jay Browder, the Vice C...

After being limited to just one day of sailing last June, the James Island Yacht Club regatta was able to get in two days of action over the Father’s Day weekend.

The event was not without a slight hiccup as poor winds shortened the racing on Saturday afternoon, but the show did go on and the regatta was able to bounce back from having abbreviated festivities in 2020 (due to COVID) and the one-day of racing last year.

More than 100 sailors participated in the 2022 regatta sailed in Charleston Harbor. Jay Browder, the Vice Commodore of the James Island Yacht Club, said this year’s event was a return to normalcy.

“It was fantastic, a great two days,” Browder said. “It was really nice to return to the level that we have been accustomed to over the years. Sunday was perfect. We were able to get all of the races in and I think everyone left happy. Weather and winds play such a big part in these events and Saturday wasn’t the best day. But things went very well on Sunday.”

Browder said there were sailors from various clubs across South Carolina, as well as racers from Georgia, Florida and North Carolina in this year’s races.

“Great competition,” he said. “Being the first regatta in the series, it’s a special event for a lot of people who work hard to make this a successful event. The people at the James Island Yacht Club are fantastic.”

Special award winners in several divisions were announced after the racing.

Arabella Duer received the A.C. Hollings Perpetual Trophy from the ILCS 4 Class of boats. Jessica Koenig received the Clyde Easterling Perpetual Trophy as the SIOD first-place performer.

The award for the youngest JIYC sailing skipper went to Ellis Frampton in the OPTI White class. Charlie Frasch received the JIYC IOBG Award for the oldest sailing skipper. He competed in the Sunfish class.

The James Island Yacht Club regatta was the first of five local summer regattas that will be sailed over the next seven weeks. Next up will be the Hobcaw Yacht Club Regatta on July 9-10. The Charleston Yacht Club Regatta will be contested July 16-17, followed by the Carolina Yacht Club Regatta on July 30-31. The season will end with the Rockville Regatta on Aug. 6-7.

James Island YC Regatta winners:

Junior Course

Class 420 – Nash Allison/Stevie Paris

OPTI – Nina Bernthal

Main Course

ILCA 4 – Arabella Duer

ILCA 6 – Will Rucker

ILCA 7 – Glenn Walker

Sunfish – Charles Frasch

Y Flyer – Will Hanckel

Outer Course

E Scow – Robby Wilkins

Lightning – Scott Harris, Jim Harris, Isa Du Plessis, Mike Mergenthaler

Melges 15 – Will Van Cleef, Jennifer Oetgen

Island One Design – Jessica Koenig, Mike Miller, Sarah Harrington

VX 1 – Ken Corsig

James Island woman founds housing nonprofit to help single moms going back to school

JAMES ISLAND — Rebekah Lambooy knows the financial burdens single mothers face living in the Charleston region where housing costs have risen dramatically in recent years.Lambooy, a single mom of three — two boys and a girl — struggled after her divorce in 2012 to make ends meet. At the time, she had been paying just under $1,000 in rent. She didn’t qualify for government assistance because her income was just below the federal threshold.Lambooy decided in 2012 to return to college and complete her bache...

JAMES ISLAND — Rebekah Lambooy knows the financial burdens single mothers face living in the Charleston region where housing costs have risen dramatically in recent years.

Lambooy, a single mom of three — two boys and a girl — struggled after her divorce in 2012 to make ends meet. At the time, she had been paying just under $1,000 in rent. She didn’t qualify for government assistance because her income was just below the federal threshold.

Lambooy decided in 2012 to return to college and complete her bachelor’s degree to advance her career. In 2016, she obtained her business degree from the College of Charleston, earning her a raise at her job as a paralegal.

But Lambooy also used her business knowledge to establish a nonprofit that seeks to help other single mothers in similar situations. The James Island resident formed HerIndependence, which provides affordable housing for single mothers obtaining post-secondary education.

Lambooy said she’s grateful to be able to help provide some financial relief for mothers making an effort to advance their education in order to provide for their families.

“I’ve been there, done that,” she said. “I want to help somebody with just a portion of assistance that I can do.”

Lambooy got interested in housing while in college, and the interest inspired her to get a real estate license after graduating. She had also been noticing the rising costs of rent that had taking shape over the years, and she saw affordable housing as a path that could help families in need.

HerIndependence now owns three houses. Two had been abandoned buildings before the nonprofit refurbished them. They house two families where single mothers are heading back to school.

A third home is currently being redone for a new family.

The organization said it has relied mostly on federal housing funds funneled through the city of North Charleston. But as construction costs rise, Lambooy fears it could impact her organization’s ability to provide housing. She eventually wants the group to expand and host multiple projects across the region.

Donations can be made online at herindependence.com.

“This isn’t a handout,” said board member Jennifer Abrusia. “This is a way to help people who want to help themselves.”

Abrusia and Lambooy are friends who initially bonded over shared experiences. Like Lambooy, Abrusia was a single mother who struggled at times financially. The two also share the fact that they each received strong support from relatives.

“We both have kind of walked this path a little bit,” Abrusia said.

Lambooy recalled the difficult journey of balancing classes, children and a full-time job.

She scheduled her college courses at 8 a.m. so she’d be home in time to take her children to school. She’d then go to work, and then pick them up from school in the afternoon. Her day wasn’t complete until she’d finished taking them to their sports and other extracurricular activities.

Lambooy, too, said she’s thankful for those who stepped in and gave her a helping hand.

“I have a lot of supportive friends and family,” she said.

Hanna junior Autumn Cayelli named Gatorade SC Girls Soccer Player of the Year

CHICAGO (June, 23, 2022) (Gatorade P.R.) — In its 37th year of honoring the nation’s best high school athletes, Gatorade today announced Autumn Cayelli of T.L. Hanna High School is the 2021-22 Gatorade South Carolina Girls Soccer Player of the Year. Cayelli is the second Gatorade South Carolina Girls Soccer Player of the Year to be chosen from T.L. Hanna High School.The award, which recognizes not only outstanding athletic excellence, but also high standards of academic achievement and exemplary character demons...

CHICAGO (June, 23, 2022) (Gatorade P.R.) — In its 37th year of honoring the nation’s best high school athletes, Gatorade today announced Autumn Cayelli of T.L. Hanna High School is the 2021-22 Gatorade South Carolina Girls Soccer Player of the Year. Cayelli is the second Gatorade South Carolina Girls Soccer Player of the Year to be chosen from T.L. Hanna High School.

The award, which recognizes not only outstanding athletic excellence, but also high standards of academic achievement and exemplary character demonstrated on and off the field, distinguishes Cayelli as South Carolina’s best high school girls soccer player. Now a finalist for the prestigious Gatorade National Girls Soccer Player of the Year award to be announced in June, Cayelli joins an elite alumni association of state award-winners in 12 sports, including Alexi Lalas (1987-88, Cranbrook High School, Mich.), Steve Cherundolo (1996-97, Mt. Carmel High School, Calif.), Abby Wambach (1997-98, Our Lady of Mercy School of Young Women, N.Y.), Heather O’Reilly (2001-02 & 2002-03, East Brunswick High School, N.J.), Matt Besler (2004-05, Blue Valley West High School, Kans.), Jack Harrison (2013-14, Berkshire High School, Mass.) and Mallory Pugh (2014-15, Mountain Vista High School, Colo.).

The 5-foot-6 junior forward and midfielder scored 49 goals and passed for four assists this past season, leading the Yellow Jackets 15-8-1) to the Class 5A state championship game. Cayelli was named Class 5A Player of the Year by the South Carolina Coaches Association of Women’s Sports. She is also a two-time All-State honoree.

The vice president of her school’s Student Council, Cayelli has volunteered locally on behalf of youth soccer camps, Meals on Wheels and the American Cancer Society’s Lights of Hope. “I’ve coached for 29 years and Autumn Cayelli is one of the best players I’ve seen,” said Mike Burris, head coach at Wren High sCHOOL. “We had her man-marked, but she moved around so much we couldn’t contain her. She’ll be a professional one day.”

Cayelli has maintained a 3.91 GPA in the classroom. She will begin her senior year of high school this fall.

The Gatorade Player of the Year program annually recognizes one winner in the District of Columbia and each of the 50 states that sanction high school football, girls volleyball, boys and girls cross country, boys and girls basketball, boys and girls soccer, baseball, softball, and boys and girls track & field, and awards one National Player of the Year in each sport. The selection process is administered by the Gatorade Player of the Year Selection Committee, which leverages experts including coaches, scouts, media and others as sources to help evaluate and determine the state winners in each sport.

Cayelli joins recent Gatorade South Carolina Girls Soccer Players of the Year Alarie Hodge (2020-21, James Island Charter High School), Miya Poplin (2019-20, Hilton Head Island High School), Caroline Conti (2018-19, J.L. Mann Academy), and Riane Coman (2017-18, Academic Magnet High School), among the state’s list of former award winners.

Gatorade has a long-standing history of serving athlete communities and understands how sports instill valuable lifelong skills on and off the field. Through Gatorade’s “Play it Forward” platform, Cayelli has the opportunity to award a $1,000 grant to a local or national organization of their choosing that helps young athletes realize the benefits of playing sports. Cayelli is also eligible to submit a short video explaining why the organization they chose is deserving of one of twelve $10,000 spotlight grants, which will be announced throughout the year. To date, Gatorade Player of the Year winners’ grants have totaled more than $3.5 million across more than 1,300 organizations.

Since the program’s inception in 1985, Gatorade Player of the Year award recipients have won hundreds of professional and college championships, and many have also turned into pillars in their communities, becoming coaches, business owners and educators.

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