Computer Support in James Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company’s IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in – we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in James Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in James Island, SC.

Areas Served

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And when we say “full range of computer support,” we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in James Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS’ fully managed computer support in James Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don’t have to build an in-house solution. We’re talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS’ CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses’ growth.

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IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS’ Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We’ll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in James Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don’t plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn’t have to be with ITS by your side.

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Cloud Computer Services in Charleston

Cloud Computer Services In James Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS’ Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS’ sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in James Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company’s antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best – keeping your customers satisfied.

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Additional Computer Services in Charleston

Additional Computer Services In James Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don’t see a solution to your problem on this page, don’t fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won’t be talking to someone at a call center. You won’t be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don’t see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in James Island

James Island congregation attempting to find ‘message in the mess’ after church fire

JAMES ISLAND — When Fort Johnson Baptist assembles for worship this Christmas, members will gather in the church’s gymnasium, not the sanctuary.That’s because a fire destroyed the church’s main worship space in September.But Fort Johnson’s parishioners understand that the spirit of Christmas isn’t limited to a specific space. The joy and love that accompanies the holiday season can be manifested wherever believers come together.After all, this wasn’t the first time Fort Johnson B...

JAMES ISLAND — When Fort Johnson Baptist assembles for worship this Christmas, members will gather in the church’s gymnasium, not the sanctuary.

That’s because a fire destroyed the church’s main worship space in September.

But Fort Johnson’s parishioners understand that the spirit of Christmas isn’t limited to a specific space. The joy and love that accompanies the holiday season can be manifested wherever believers come together.

After all, this wasn’t the first time Fort Johnson Baptist had seen devastation.

A spray-painted wooden sign was used to announce worship services days after Hurricane Hugo in 1989 toppled the church’s steeple. The sign, which had been stored above the church’s ceiling, reemerged after a portion of the overhead surface gave way during the September blaze.

“It’s a good reminder that even after disaster, good things can happen,” said Pastor Marty Middleton, 43.

During the Christmas holiday season — one of the most important times of year for the Christian community — Fort Johnson finds itself attempting to preserve a sense of hope as the congregation continues grappling with the destruction of its house of worship. At the same time, congregants are revisiting what it truly means to be a church, inspired by an outpouring of support from the community and congregations that have faced similar challenges.

A message from the mess

A preschool student was the first to smell the smoke on Sept. 9, telling his mother, “it smells like a cookout out here.” The boy’s mother, a teacher at the church’s preschool, called emergency officials around 8:30 a.m. to report a fire at the church, located at 1473 Camp Road.

Firefighters with the James Island Public Service District Fire Department and other area agencies were able to put out the blaze within an hour. Officials determined a lightning strike hit the steeple and caused the fire. The steeple fell during the blaze, taking about half of the roof with it.

The fire damage is primarily concentrated in the sanctuary. The church’s educational building, which houses the preschool, wasn’t harmed by the fire itself, though it did receive water damage from fire hoses.

Helen Needham grew up in Fort Johnson. Her family served as charter members of the congregation, established by James Island Baptist in 1960.

Fort Johnson’s sanctuary holds precious memories for their family. Needham, her sisters and her daughter all had their weddings in the church’s sanctuary. Needham’s children were baptized there. She held back tears as she recalled the day the building was engulfed in flames.

“When I saw that the church steeple was gone, I cried,” she said.

Standing in the pulpit of the sanctuary earlier this month, Middleton surveyed the rubble. Broken glass, charred wood and other debris was scattered across the floor and atop pews. The sanctuary’s ceiling caved in, leaving a gaping hole that reveals a blue sky. Mold has overtaken many of the walls. The floor was soaked with rainwater.

The destruction is a visual reminder of the messiness that exists in the world, Middleton said. The concept rings especially true this year as we all continue to navigate, with uncertainty, the pandemic.

“Sometimes, when you come to church, your life is a mess,” Middleton said. “But God is in the business of restoring that mess — taking that mess and making a message.”

The church has adjusted, relocating its preschool to a separate campus building and its worship services to the church’s gymnasium, normally used for local recreational basketball games. The pastor anticipates reconstruction will begin in a few weeks, once the church’s insurance company determines whether it will be feasible to renovate the existing sanctuary, or if the church should tear it down and build a new one.

Middleton said his task is to help his congregation stay focused on the church’s mission and to remain positive. His most recent sermon series, “Hopeful Expectation,” tells congregants to expect goodness at the end of this tragedy. This ties into the holiday season, when themes of hope and peace are prominent.

Fort Johnson’s members have been looking forward to positive, yet simple, changes that might come out of fire, such fresh carpet, new pews, and possibly a new sanctuary.

The worship services, though in a nontraditional setting, have been a source of inspiration. Attendance has been steady and a sense of hope permeates the room, Middleton said.

“God’s promises are true,” Middleton said. “So when he says he comes to bring peace and comfort, he’ll do that when we trust in him.”

The tragedy has also taught parishioners at Fort Johnson to focus more on relationships.

Since the fire, church members have come together some Wednesday nights to pray specifically for the restoration process. New relationships are being formed, too. The congregation has grown with the addition of five families who’ve joined the church in the last three months.

For the most part, Fort Johnson has sought to maintain a regular rhythm of Christmas programs and mission activities.

The church’s preschool relocated its annual Christmas pageant to the front lawn. Small children, dressed to depict angels and wise men, retold the biblical Christmas narrative and sang holiday songs. The church continued its involvement in Operation Christmas Child, an initiative where churches buy Christmas gifts for children across the world. The congregation has also bought gifts for a few local families caring for foster children.

“We haven’t let the fire stop us, “Needham said.

Continuing to serve

Fort Johnson has also seen an outpouring of support from the community.

One church donated sound equipment for the church to use during Sunday worship. Another congregation gave Fort Johnson toys and tables to use for the preschool to replace items that had been damaged by smoke. Local businesses donated food for congregants who, on the weekends, had been setting up chairs and equipment in preparation for Sunday worship.

Several other faith communities sent financial donations, including St. Andrew’s in Mount Pleasant, which donated $10,000 to Fort Johnson to express its support.

St. Andrew’s can relate to the difficulties being faced by the James Island group. The Mount Pleasant church lost its entire ministry center to a massive blaze in 2018, leaving the roughly 2,000-member congregation without a place to worship and its day school without a place to meet.

Bishop Steve Wood recalled that the days following the fire involved mostly addressing those immediate concerns. But Wood said he also tried to keep St. Andrew’s focused on its mission of service.

In doing so, he wrote a letter after the blaze that eventually became a regular form of communication, keeping members encouraged and updated on the reconstruction timeline.

“I just told them we’d be OK,” he said.

The church then engaged in ministry outside the building. St. Andrew’s “adopted” a Mount Pleasant fire station and served firefighters baked goods. Lawyers and architects in the congregation offered their skillsets to help the church with its renovation process. Members conducted prayer walks throughout the Mount Pleasant neighborhood where the church sits. Parishioners bought rosebushes for a few neighbors. Congregants began building relationships with teachers at Mount Pleasant Academy, where the church began holding Sunday services.

Wood’s advice for Fort Johnson is to, in spite of the tragedy, seek opportunities to serve others.

“The most challenging thing is that a fire, and these kinds of circumstances, can be so consuming that you miss what God is actually doing in the moment,” Wood said. “Maintain a mission focus. Keep the main thing the main thing. Be attentive to what God is doing around you. He’s mobilizing people around you.”

Reach Rickey Dennis at 937-4886. Follow him on Twitter @RCDJunior.

Sapakoff: SC’s minority coach status minus Earl Grant, Tony Elliott

Boston College head basketball coach Earl Grant has known Virginia head football coach Tony Elliott since they were middle-school basketball opponents in Charleston – Grant representing North Charleston teams, Elliott from James Island.They got to know each other better when Grant was a Clemson assistant coach during Elliott’s long tenure on Dabo Swinney’s Clemson football staff. Grant talked about his friend’s jump to Virginia ahead of the Jan. 15 Boston College-Clemson basketball game“That’...

Boston College head basketball coach Earl Grant has known Virginia head football coach Tony Elliott since they were middle-school basketball opponents in Charleston – Grant representing North Charleston teams, Elliott from James Island.

They got to know each other better when Grant was a Clemson assistant coach during Elliott’s long tenure on Dabo Swinney’s Clemson football staff. Grant talked about his friend’s jump to Virginia ahead of the Jan. 15 Boston College-Clemson basketball game

“That’s a big deal,” Grant said. “He put in a lot of work in, a lot of years. I think he’s prepared for this opportunity to be a coach at that level.”

The ACC’s gain of two young Black head coaches with Lowcountry ties is South Carolina’s loss. Elliott and Grant leave the state with 11 minority head coaches or primary coordinators in football, men’s and women’s basketball and baseball among South Carolina’s NCAA Division I schools (not including Historically Black Colleges and Universities).

Relative comparisons are hard in an apples and peaches mix of states that differ in population and demographics, and between college and pro sports.

S.C. diversity hiring looks great right now compared to the NFL, which has eight job openings but just one Black head coach, Pittsburgh’s Mike Tomlin.

But Charleston Southern’s Autry Denson is S.C.’s first and only Black head football coach ever at the non-HBCU NCAA Division I level.

Elliott’s departure leaves South Carolina defensive coordinator Clayton White as the Palmetto State’s only primary football coordinator aside from S.C. State in Division I.

We can do better.

We won’t do better without tweaks at the top.

“The only thing I’ve ever said is that, at the end of the day, there’s not enough minority administrators,” said South Carolina head basketball coach Frank Martin, who is of Cuban descent. “We need more minority administrators. And anyone that acts differently is fooling themselves.”

Major conferences appear to be trying.

The SEC in July of 2021 launched a new hiring and development initiative “aimed at encouraging, facilitating and assisting member institutions in attracting and hiring individuals in historically underrepresented groups in the leadership of their athletics departments.”

The ACC adopted a CORE (Champions of Racial Equity) policy in July of 2020. Part of that is nudging the conference office and member athletic departments to “review staff composition and hiring practices to establish diverse search committees and diverse candidate pools to continue our commitment to diversity in hiring.”

Unlike the NFL’s Rooney Rule, the conferences are not threatening penalties if schools don’t follow through (not that such threats have greatly helped in the NFL).

Clemson promoted associate athletic director Graham Neff in December soon after athletic director Dan Radakovich left for the University of Miami. Upon the official announcement, Clemson President Jim Clements said Neff, “in every sense of the word, is a ‘five-star,’” referring to the term used to describe a blue-chip football recruit.

A Clemson spokesperson told The Post and Courier that three finalists interviewed for the athletic director job, “including one who identifies as a minority.”

As for other key athletic department positions around South Carolina, here are the minority head coaches and primary football coordinators in football, basketball and baseball at non-HBCU NCAA Division I schools in South Carolina (with some hiring to be done soon, particularly on football staffs):

Football

Autry Denson, Charleston Southern, head coach

Clayton White, South Carolina, defensive coordinator

Men’s basketball

Frank Martin, South Carolina

Quinton Ferrell, Presbyterian

Dave Dickerson, USC Upstate

Women’s basketball

Dawn Staley, South Carolina

Clarisse Garcia, Charleston Southern

Jackie Carson, Furman

Jada Williams, Coastal Carolina

Semeka Randall Lay, Winthrop

Baseball

Elton Pollock, Presbyterian

Why women’s basketball?

It’s no accident that women’s basketball is the leader here, for two disparate reasons:

• Women’s basketball, at the college and pro level, is just more sensible.

• Women’s basketball as a non-revenue sport within the college realm isn’t at all like football, in which the head coach is the lead salesperson of a fundraising campaign aimed at an older, predominantly white audience.

Which meshes with what Martin is saying about hiring habits.

“We end up trusting people that we’re around all the time,” he said. “And when you’re around a certain group of people, chances are you’re going to go in that direction. … That’s just facts of life. That’s reality.”

To help make a difference, Martin and former South Carolina head football coach Will Muschamp founded a McClendon Minority Initiative job at South Carolina in July of 2020. It is funding for a young minority employee in the athletic department.

Kentucky head basketball coach John Calipari came up with the idea. He named it after the late John McClendon, famed for many pioneer roles as a Black basketball coach, including becoming the first Black coach at a predominantly White university.

That was at Cleveland State in 1966.

More than a half-century later, Autry Denson and Clayton White are outliers in South Carolina and minority athletic directors are hard to find throughout American college sports.

Follow Gene Sapakoff on Twitter @sapakoff

Why I returned to Charleston, SC

These are contributor-submitted pieces. Want to join the conversation? We invite you to write for us. Learn how to share your voice here.Back in November, we asked readers who had left the city why they returned to Charleston. We love these stories of locals at heart who knew they wanted to ...

These are contributor-submitted pieces. Want to join the conversation? We invite you to write for us. Learn how to share your voice here.

Back in November, we asked readers who had left the city why they returned to Charleston. We love these stories of locals at heart who knew they wanted to make their way back to the Holy City. We’re lucky to live here, and happy to welcome them home. “I was born in Charleston and lived here until I was 22. In order for my husband to complete his studies at Emory graduate school, we moved to Atlanta, Georgia. After fifty years, I moved back to Charleston because it will be my home always. The smell of marsh gas, the mosquitos, the humidity and anything else that tried to keep me away failed to do so.” —Reader Teresa R. I left due to a divorce and had 2 small children and returned to my home state so family could help with child care. I really did not want to leave and knew that I would return. Reason, quality of life! You can have culture and the beach in a very unique setting! I fell in love with Charleston, it is my happy place! So happy to be back!” —Reader Linda N.

“I moved here after college to live with CofC grads. I was here for 2 years and left to get a tech job closer to family. After two years, and the ability to work remotely — I couldn’t pass up the weather and the ease of travel to get back home. The weather in the north is brutal. Also, the cost of living compared to Boston was a big pull!” —Reader Shane W.Retired in Charleston 1985. Went to Atlanta for new challenges. Retired again, and one more time! Moved back to Charleston in 2019. My 15 family members live here! Love them!” —Reader Ken B. “Growing up a military brat, my dad retired in Myrtle Beach where I graduated Socastee HS, graduated Horry G-Town Tech College and… joined the Coast Guard! Ironically I was assigned to Charleston, SC, in January 1990 in the aftermath of Charleston’s infamous visitor, Hurricane Hugo. I was here in CHS from 1900 to 1993 and I enjoyed it very much. (I lived in West Ashley, N. Charleston & Mt Pleasant.)

Nearly 33 years later, having been to 53 countries, lived in NC, CA, HI, USVI, TX, VA… temporarily staying in many more cities/states, Charleston is where I decided to return to and retire in 2012. Now, I’m not going to lie… it was #3 on my list: first was Maui (became very difficult logistically), next was San Diego (became way too unfriendly on a retirement income […] so here I am.

I loved almost everything about Charleston (particularly James Island). Minus the bugs and humidity it’s a first class city to live in. Now I am quite literally sick over the number of apartments and condos being built in the Charleston Metro area and could not even imagine what has become of Summerville and John’s Island. But here my wife and I will stay, come what may. All in all I still love living here, despite the growth which this city’s infrastructure will not be able to sustain.

We enjoy the delicious food, history, culture, weather, cost of living, arts, festivals, city sports teams ie; Rays, Riverdogs, Battery and proximity to the coast. City/state taxes are not excessive and costs for government services are fair. It’s a relatively clean and safe city compared to others similar in size and population. So thanks for asking… interesting to see how the city will grow in the future.” —Readers Scott + Kim M.

Town of James Island to request $6.4M in state, federal funds to stem creek contamination

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not b...

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.

Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.

“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not be out of pocket tap fees and connection fees, impact fees to the residents,” Schaeffer said.

The town said they will be requesting $6.4 million in federal and state funding to help make the project happen. In addition to the requested money, Schaeffer said the town will commit $1.8 million from American Rescue Plan funds that the town had received.

The James Island Creek Task Force consists of members from the City of Charleston, James Island and Charleston County.

Charleston Waterkeeper Executive Director Andrew Wunderley, who is part of the task force, said the group was formed in 2020 to find ways to clean up the creek and make it safe for swimming.

“Right now, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right with the American Rescue Act funding that’s coming to the state of South Carolina and is specifically earmarked for projects like this that are tied to public health and are tied to water and sewer upgrades,” Wunderley said.

Fred Schuh has lived alongside the James Island Creek for 20 years. He said he uses the creek regularly with his grandchildren and wants the septic tanks in the area removed to better the community’s health.

“It is concerning,” Schuh said. “Except for people who take an interest in testing it, we would not know there’s anything changed about it, but when there’s scientific studies done to show that there’s a problem, we need to pay attention to it.”

As a possible solution, Schuh also suggested that septic tanks should be inspected more frequently, so property owners could know when to repair their tanks.

However, for now, he said he supports the town requesting the funds to help solve the problem.

“If we could make the public aware of this and ask whatever funds possible be diverted to this extremely useful endeavor, I say I’m all for it,” Schuh said.

Schaeffer said during the meeting that he hopes the project gets funded when the money from the federal government begins being distributed in January or February.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

SC closes on nuns’ James Island waterfront property for $23M with plans to make a park

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.The announcement was ...

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.

In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.

The announcement was a surprise at the time.

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, told The Post and Courier in an interview this week that lawmakers only noticed the property was for sale as the window to bid was rapidly closing, and that the state’s formal offer came after that period had ended.

The state’s offer was not the highest, but it was successful, Campsen said, in part because it came without conditions that a developer might attach — like not closing until building permits are awarded.

Property records indicate the sale closed at the end of July, and the final price was $23.25 million.

The opportunity to preserve the 23-acre waterfront parcel from development, complete with views of Fort Sumter and the rest of Charleston Harbor, was a rare one, Campsen said.

He said the sisters “felt like their legacy and their stewardship of that land would be best protected, best preserved for future generations if the state bought it.”

The property will be owned by the Department of Natural Resources, which runs the marine lab next door, and managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, which might one day rent out the convent building on the site.

Campsen said the 24 rooms would probably have to be expanded for future visitors.

Sam Queen, a spokeswoman for PRT, said that a public planning process for the site is expected to begin early next year.

“It definitely is a unique situation and one we’re excited about,” she said.

DNR, meanwhile, had already been doing some work near the site, cooperating with the sisters there to use oyster reefs to stabilize erosion on the waterfront, said Erin Weeks, an agency spokeswoman. Most of the parcel is forested, with a residence building and a chapel on site.

Campsen said he was excited for the planning process to incorporate the existing DNR land, and that the two parcels could be at least partially tied together into one park. It’s a historically significant area — the point at the end of Fort Johnson Road is where the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter.

In the meantime, nothing will change on the land any time soon. As a condition of the sale, the sisters are allowed to stay on the property through at least June 2022, with an option to extend to December 2022.

The nuns were looking to move as their members age and new women don’t join the ranks. Sister Mary Joseph Ritter confirmed that the congregation planned to relocate to the Bishop Gadsden retirement home, but the transition wouldn’t come until next year.

“We’re on the waiting list, just like everybody else,” she said.

The congregation didn’t have any further details on the move, she said, but would have more to say in the coming months about how they hope to preserve their legacy.

Twelve members remain among the Sisters of Charity, a congregation that has ministered in Charleston since 1829. Through its history, the group ran a school for free children of color in the 1840s, cared for both Union and Confederate wounded soldiers during the Civil War, and founded the hospital that would evolve into the Roper-St. Francis health care system.

The sisters moved to their current home on James Island in the 1950s.

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