Computer Support in Hilton Head Island SC

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If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Hilton Head Island, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Hilton Head Island, SC.

IT Support Hilton Head Island, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Hilton Head Island, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Hilton Head Island, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Hilton Head Island, SC
 Computer Services Hilton Head Island, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Hilton Head Island, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Hilton Head Island, SC
 Cloud Services Hilton Head Island, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Hilton Head Island, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Hilton Head Island, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Hilton Head Island, SC
 Data Security Hilton Head Island, SC

Additional Computer Services In Hilton Head Island, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Hilton Head Island, SC

Old Port Royal shrimp boat is sunk off Hilton Head Island. It’s now being put to good use

A 70-foot shrimp boat — once docked in the town of Port Royal — has joined New York City subway cars and other unusual materials that make up a man-made reef off of South Carolina’s Hilton Head Island, where black sea bass, grouper and barracuda and other fish hang out.On Oct. 25, the Palmetto Pride, a shrimp boat with Beaufort-based Sea Eagle Market, captained by Cameron Reaves, towed the Buccaneer to Betsy Ross Reef, 16 miles east of Hilton Head, where it was sunk the next day, said Craig Reaves, Cameron’s br...

A 70-foot shrimp boat — once docked in the town of Port Royal — has joined New York City subway cars and other unusual materials that make up a man-made reef off of South Carolina’s Hilton Head Island, where black sea bass, grouper and barracuda and other fish hang out.

On Oct. 25, the Palmetto Pride, a shrimp boat with Beaufort-based Sea Eagle Market, captained by Cameron Reaves, towed the Buccaneer to Betsy Ross Reef, 16 miles east of Hilton Head, where it was sunk the next day, said Craig Reaves, Cameron’s brother.

Craig Reeves sees it as a “win win,” he said, because the older shrimp boat will benefit both the environment in its new life and Port Royal’s efforts to remove old boats from its water prepares as it prepares to build a new shrimp dock and processing facility.

The Reaves family worked with South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, which runs the state’s artificial reef program, to clean up and sink the vessel, which Laten Reaves, Craig and Cameron Reaves’ father, had purchased from the Florida owner. The engines of the boat, Reaves said, no longer worked, Craig Reeves said, and the owner had to leave the Port Royal dock because it’s being replaced.

The Coastal Conservation Association, Reaves said, was also assisted in the project.

The iron-hulled Buccaneer will have a new purpose at Betsy Ross Reef, one of more than 40 artificial reefs the SCDNR manages in waters along South Carolina’s coast that benefit marine life.

Besty Ross is named after a 430-foot liberty ship, which is the largest piece of artificial-reef structure off the South Carolina coast. New York City subway cars, bridge sections, a 105-foot tug boat and a 100-foot barge also are among the items that make up the reef, which provides food and shelter for fish and other marine life.

“The subway cars and military vehicles,” Craig Reaves said, “are some of the neatest things that go down out there.”

Sea Eagle Market, Reaves said, has worked with the state’s reef program before in preparing boats for sinking. It receives compensation for its expenses.

Artificial reefs off South Carolina are especially important to fisheries because of the lack of hard-bottom areas suitable for natural reef formation, the DNR says. Durable materials like old boats are eventually covered by algae, barnacles, corals and sponges, it says, which attract fish.

In June, the Buccaneer was towed from the Town of Port Royal dock to Sea Eagle Market docks on St. Helena Island. Over the next three months, its engines, oil and Styrofoam — anything that could potentially harm the environment — were removed.

Access points were cut out below the boat’s water line and covered with patches, Craig Reaves said. Later, at the reef, those patches were removed and the Buccaneer was filled with water. It sank, in two hours, in 90 feet of water.

In April, the Town of Port Royal gave owners of old and/or abandoned boats tied to the dock a deadline to move.

The town also is moving forward with an ordinance aimed at preventing boats from being abandoned in its waters in the future. It would require a permit for mooring a boat, prohibit mooring too close to public boat landings, bridges, private docks and marinas, and ban derelict or abandoned vessels. Police would be given the authority to seize and tow vessels in violation.

The work comes as the town prepares to replace its iconic but dilapidated dock, one of few publicly owned commercial fishing docks remaining in the state. In July 2021, lawmakers OK’d $900,000 for a new shrimp dock. The town also plans to put $600,000 it received in an insurance settlement toward the dock and a new processing facility.

Town Manager Van Willis said the town is awaiting action from a federal court giving it the authority to either auction or destroy the two remaining boats that remain tied to its old dock, a shrimp boat and a sail boat.

South Carolina has some memorable wins this year. How the Clemson game was different

Senior defensive lineman Zacch Pickens had to hear about South Carolina’s recent losses to Clemson during his Thanksgiving dinner.Pickens has family about 20 minutes away from Clemson, a place the Gamecocks hadn’t won since 2012.“What about those Tigers?” Pickens heard while back home to Anderson, where he starred at T.L. Hanna High School.South Carolina...

Senior defensive lineman Zacch Pickens had to hear about South Carolina’s recent losses to Clemson during his Thanksgiving dinner.

Pickens has family about 20 minutes away from Clemson, a place the Gamecocks hadn’t won since 2012.

“What about those Tigers?” Pickens heard while back home to Anderson, where he starred at T.L. Hanna High School.

South Carolina (8-4) secured the 31-30 win Saturday — with some of Pickens’ family in attendance at Memorial Stadium. And the recipe for victory didn’t look like the Gamecocks’ other memorable wins this season.

The team fell into a 14-0 hole in the first quarter, struggling to move the ball offensively. Spencer Rattler was intercepted on the first play of the team’s second drive, and Clemson returned it for a touchdown. Later in the half, he was pressured in his own end zone and the Tigers forced him into a safety.

He completed a 65-yard pass to Juju McDowell on a fourth-and-1, then threw his second interception of the game while in the red zone.

Most of South Carolina’s signature wins this season came from quick starts — like its defensive fumble recovery early against Kentucky and the kick return touchdown to open the game against Texas A&M. The team also struck first against Tennessee last week and led 21-7 after the first quarter.

This time, against Clemson, the Gamecocks had to overcome a nine-point halftime deficit.

“You gotta keep fighting through adversity,” Rattler said. “We knew there was gonna be adversity in a big rivalry game like this.”

Rattler’s accuracy in the second half picked up, and he avoided the mistakes he made earlier in the game. His best throw of the day came on a 72-yard completion to wide receiver Antwane Wells, who recorded 131 yards and two touchdowns against the Tigers.

Rattler led the Gamecocks to three scoring drives in the second half, including the possession that ended with Mitch Jeter’s go-ahead field goal.

The USC defense allowed just one touchdown in that same time frame. The Tigers punted the ball five times in the half, and cornerback Marcellas Dial came away with his team-leading third interception of the season.

Dial had a couple of opportunities at a takeaway prior to that moment and helped clinch the victory with the pick.

“Like coach (Shane) Beamer said, we knew they were going to throw us one,” Dial said. “And the time I got it, too, was very big. It was a great feeling.”

The teams alternated possessions a bit in the game’s final few minutes. Clemson’s last touch was on a punt return, and the Gamecocks forced Tigers freshman Antonio Williams into a fumble.

That turnover essentially sealed Clemson’s fate, but Wells put the game away by converting the final third down of the game.

Rattler, who’s being throwing Wells’ way all season, encouraged offensive coordinator Marcus Satterfield to give the James Madison transfer one more opportunity.

“Juice with the ball in his hands is scary,” Rattler said. “I said, ‘Satt, let’s call this play and finish it right now.’ ”

The exuberant USC locker room was complete with victory cigars and celebratory music.

Some players had been waiting on a win against Clemson since they arrived at USC. Others have never been part of the rivalry and will start their personal records against the Tigers at 1-0.

“All this stuff is new to me,” Wells said. “I never even knew we got a trophy for winning this game.”

South Carolina is on a bit of a hot streak. It defeated then-No. 5 Tennessee last week before knocking off No. 8 Clemson on Saturday. The Gamecocks compromised — and perhaps ended — both teams’ chances of making the College Football Playoff.

Despite the 63-point outing against the Volunteers, the Gamecocks came into Saturday as underdogs.

“When we took care of business last week, it wasn’t just, ‘OK, we did it, great,’ ” Beamer said. “No, we plan on doing it two (weeks) in a row. And we did.”

The team still has a bowl game to play after picking up its eighth win this season.

But in what stood as the regular-season finale, South Carolina came from behind and beat the Tigers for the first time in nine years.

“I know what this rivalry means to the people of South Carolina and Gamecocks everywhere,” Beamer said. “And just really happy for them. I’m really happy for our seniors.”

For Pickens — one of those seniors — the comeback win relieved him some from the grief he’ll get from his family.

“It’s amazing,” Pickens said. “Now I don’t have to hear about that every time I go home.”

This story was originally published November 26, 2022 7:13 PM.

A day trip to historic McClellanville, SC, is a step back in time

“How long have you been in business here?” I asked the proprietor of T.W. Graham & Co., an unassuming seafood restaurant located in a historic storefront on the oak-shaded main street of the coastal village of McClellanville.“We’ve been in business since 1894” he said, and then, with a grin that made it more than an afterthought, “but I’m not the original owner.”Do tell.I was speaking with Patrick Runey, who busied himself greeting patrons and chatting with friends as t...

“How long have you been in business here?” I asked the proprietor of T.W. Graham & Co., an unassuming seafood restaurant located in a historic storefront on the oak-shaded main street of the coastal village of McClellanville.

“We’ve been in business since 1894” he said, and then, with a grin that made it more than an afterthought, “but I’m not the original owner.”

Do tell.

I was speaking with Patrick Runey, who busied himself greeting patrons and chatting with friends as the Saturday evening crowd began to gather for dinner and conversation.

T.W. Graham & Co. is a fixture in the small fishing village, and being only a stone’s throw from docks crowded with shrimp boats, it serves up an offering of fresh seafood for lunch and dinner almost daily. With my plate covered with freshly prepared shrimp, hand-shredded cole slaw, fries and hushpuppies, Patrick described how all of this came to be.

“I am from Charleston, and when the owners were looking to sell, I told them our plans and they knew we were the right buyer. They had other offers but did not want it to go to just anyone.”

Originally a general store, T.W. Graham & Co. has served the people of McClellanville in many ways during the 128 years it has sat on Pinckney Street. Today, it continues to be place where villagers and out-of-towners alike gather, and life for the little waterfront community rolls on.

McClellanville lies on the edge of a vast network of marshy creeks and rivers that stretches to the horizon, where the old lighthouse stands on the point of Cape Romain. Founded in the 1850s as a seaside escape for the swamp-haunted plantation owners of the Santee River region, the town quickly became a productive fishing village.

Today, it has become a destination for day tourists and overnight visitors who come to the little settlement between Charleston and Georgetown, with a desire to escape the ordinary and enjoy the peace and quiet of life under the live oaks.

When you visit McClellanville, you will encounter a place that is like a picture of Lowcountry days gone by. A network of quiet streets connect frame houses that range from two-story farmhouse-style to small, comfortable cottages. A dozen classic storefronts stand along Pinckney Street, where you can purchase hand-made local gifts and items of coastal decor, while being welcomed by friendly locals who are glad for your visit.

A crossroads in the center of the village is home to neighborhood churches, including the historic chapel of ease for the parish church of St. James Episcopal. The gingerbread trim reflects the 19th century Lowcountry style. Here, the congregation worships each Sunday, and also maintains the old brick church of St. James Santee near Hampton Plantation.

A drive to the end of Pinckney Street brings you to the Village Museum, a cultural center where the history of the town and region are preserved. A town dock will give you a view down Jeremy Creek to the vast marshy wilderness stretching to the Atlantic, or upstream to the spires and nets of the shrimp fleet, docked at the seafood company off Oak Street.

The boats form a backdrop for the Seaman’s Memorial, dedicated to the memory of those who lost their lives while working the coastal waters of South Carolina. It’s a reminder of the cost of braving sea and storm to bring home each day’s catch.

You can cap off your visit with a delicious meal at T.W. Graham & Co. or at one of the other great restaurants in town, local institutions like the McClellanville Diner, The Bent Rod, and Buckshots provide an array of seafood, comfort food or more adventurous fare to please any palate.

As I finished my meal and prepared to return home, I only wished that I had more time to explore and enjoy this quiet, beautiful town. Whether you stay in McClellanville for a day, or simply visit while passing through, you will feel very much at home.

McClellanville is located off US. 17 between Charleston and Georgetown.

A drive of a little over two hours will take you through Charleston and along the wide, lonely coast highway. McClellanville is located 30 miles above Charleston and just before you cross the Santee River. As you come within the town limits you will see three of the popular local restaurants, each open at various days and times to accommodate your appetite or itinerary.

To enter the village proper, take a right onto Pinckney Street, and follow its winding track into town. You will soon come to the business district where shops and T.W. Graham & Co. welcome you, or you can continue beyond to visit the museum, churches and the often-busy waterfront along Jeremy Creek.

There are many things to do and explore nearby as well. You can explore nature at Santee Coastal Reserve, discover history at Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, or arrange for an excursion by boat to visit the historic lighthouse at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge.

For more information on the town and its offerings, visit the town of McClellanville homepage at https://www.mcclellanvillesc.org or call T.W. Graham & Co. at (843) 887-4342.

SC beaches earn ‘C’ grade in new environmental report. Here’s why

South Carolina is widely known for its pristine beaches and historical significance. Families flock to the Palmetto State every year for family vacations and memory making.However, a new report says these beaches might not be as immaculate as many have thought to believe.South Carolina earned a ‘C’ grade in the 2022 “State of the Beach” report from the ...

South Carolina is widely known for its pristine beaches and historical significance. Families flock to the Palmetto State every year for family vacations and memory making.

However, a new report says these beaches might not be as immaculate as many have thought to believe.

South Carolina earned a ‘C’ grade in the 2022 “State of the Beach” report from the Surfrider Foundation, a non-profit environmental organization. The report is meant to describe how each state is maintaining its coastlines and give a letter grade based on its success or lack thereof.

South Carolina is doing “a ‘decent job’ of coastal management and continues to implement strong policies mitigating beach nourishment and restricting coastal armoring,” according to the report.

“Despite having good policies in place to manage sand and erosion, the state needs to limit all new development in flood zones and advance sea level rise planning work,” the report continued.

The ‘C’ grade was given to the state of South Carolina for its “mediocre policies.”

This grade was given from an accumulation of categories including: sediment management, coastal armoring, development and sea level rise.

Despite the state’s “ok” analysis, the report stated that “the state does an effective job of analyzing physical and ecological implications of beach nourishment, including protecting critical turtle habitat, spawning seasons and migratory movements of important marine species.”

The report details that South Carolina has included living shorelines in its coastal management strategies for 20 years. It also has solid policies on restricting armoring.

As for the state’s living shorelines, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control has issued new regulations. These define and set performance standards for living shorelines to help support their effective implementation, the report states.

The reason being that “unfortunately, the rebuilding of structures located seaward of setback lines that are destroyed due to natural hazards is allowed. The state recognizes the coastal dunes as important buffers for development; however, the state would benefit from codified policies to ensure the protection of these buffers,” as described by the report.

Aside from the”bad” report label, the state does have good setback standards. These standards are 40 times the average annual erosion rate and are no less than 20 feet from the top of the main sand dune at ocean coastlines, the report notes.

In addition, setback lines are revisited every seven to 10 years.

Although the state has worked to improve sea level rise planning within the past few years and the ‘Climate Change Impacts to Natural Resources in South Carolina’ does hold “good adaptation methods,” the state has a sea level rise vulnerability assessment that is “fairly broad,” states the report.

“None of these adaptation recommendations have been implemented or codified. In addition, minimal community awareness or educational resources about climate change and sea level rise are provided on state websites,” the report continued.

• Prohibit the rebuilding of coastal structures seaward of the setback line that were destroyed due to natural hazards.

• Remove coastal armoring exceptions currently in place.

• Develop and implement an adaptation plan using outlined policies and management recommendations in the Adapting to Shoreline Change report.

• Establish stronger restrictions on developments in coastal hazard areas and locations seaward of the baseline.

• Conduct a thorough sea level rise vulnerability assessment.

• Require that repairs of coastal structures from storms are restricted, retreated or built to higher standards.

• Develop state websites with educational resources and guidelines for coastal communities to prepare for climate change and sea level rise.

• Remove exemptions for golf courses to build in coastal hazard areas.

• Ensure that management agencies have jurisdiction to adequately enforce regulations.

Hilton Head Island Concours d' Elegance taps 1936 Horch 853A Special Roadster as 'Best of Show'

Hilton Head Island, SC - The 20th anniversary exhibition of automobiles, airplanes, watercraft and more announces 2022 winners with the 1936 Horch 853A Special Roadster owned by Mr. Robert S. Jepson, Jr. of Savannah, Georgia taking home “Best of Show.'' The grand finale was held at the Port Royal Golf Club on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina with strong attendance. More than 600 collector vehicles from around the country were presented throughout the event, taking visitors on a journey of innovation, history, art and design....

Hilton Head Island, SC - The 20th anniversary exhibition of automobiles, airplanes, watercraft and more announces 2022 winners with the 1936 Horch 853A Special Roadster owned by Mr. Robert S. Jepson, Jr. of Savannah, Georgia taking home “Best of Show.'' The grand finale was held at the Port Royal Golf Club on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina with strong attendance. More than 600 collector vehicles from around the country were presented throughout the event, taking visitors on a journey of innovation, history, art and design.

The 2022 awards recognize the best-of-the-best in automotive alongside five additional categories which were also awarded as follows:

Lindsey Harrell, the Festival’s President, said, “As we celebrate this milestone occasion, twenty years since our founding, we are grateful for the vision of our board, event team and organizers. Over the course of the last two decades, our vision has grown into one of the most robust motoring events on the East Coast. This weekend was an exciting moment to celebrate what this show means to its audience, from the people who enjoy cars regularly to the visitors who attended for the very first time. It is also an opportunity to reflect on our history, to plan thoughtfully for our future, and to say thank you. We are grateful to everyone who supports us in achieving our goals.”

A complete list of winners and awards will be posted to the Festival’s website before the end of the month. For more information on this year’s winner or for information on the 2023 show, visit the official website at www.HHIConcours.com.

ABOUT THE HILTON HEAD ISLAND CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE & MOTORING FESTIVAL:

The Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival’s 2023 event will be held November 3rd through 5th on Hilton Head Island. Hilton Head Island Concours d'Elegance, Inc., a 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Organization, is a unique, multi-day "Lowcountry" motoring experience that entertains and educates the community while supporting youth programs. Whether four wheels or two, a propeller, a sail or a horseless carriage, the Motoring Festival offers the full gamut with over 700 vintage and specialty vehicles on display. The weekend celebration offers everything from an elegant hangar gala to a showcase of car clubs displaying their pride and joy to the culmination, the heart of the event, the Concours d'Elegance, all with a touch of Southern hospitality. For more on the event, visit https://www.hhiconcours.com.

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