Computer Support in Charleston SC

All your IT. One complete solution.

Let us help you today!

843-419-6788

Free IT Consultation

If you are a business owner, trying to handle your company's IT issues on your own is like trying to find your way home on a boat without navigation tools. Sure, some folks on board might be able to figure out which way is north, but without a map, guidance, and a comprehensive plan, you will be floating along until something catastrophic happens.

That is where ITS comes in - we work as a life raft for businesses trying to navigate the waters of IT without any experience or tools at their disposal. We do this by working as a team to provide our clients with a wide range of customized IT computer services in Charleston, SC from hardware and software management to network maintenance and VOIP solutions.

At ITS, our commitment is to you and your business. We like to think of our client relationships as partnerships. You can rest easy knowing that you are partnering with a privately owned company that has been in business since 2003. We employ a well-versed team of highly-trained professionals holding many of the top certifications in the IT industry.

While we hold many national certifications, we are proud to say that we are locals. Unlike some companies, you will have one point of contact at ITS. We work onsite at your business, giving you the chance to meet us face-to-face, while we provide you with a full range of computer support in Charleston, SC.

IT Support Charleston, SC

Areas Served

And when we say "full range of computer support," we mean it! Here is a quick glance at how ITS can help with all of your IT support needs:

Complete Cloud Computer Services in Charleston, SC

Suppose saving money and boosting productivity is what your business needs. In that case, ITS' fully managed computer support in Charleston, SC provides your business with a full-time, outsourced IT department at a fixed price, so you don't have to build an in-house solution. We're talking support for ALL internet, backup, Cloud networking, security, hardware, and software. ITS here to support your business 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Our technicians keep every aspect of your infrastructure in working order, so you can focus on running your day-to-day operations while we wipe away your IT capital expenses. With ITS' CompleteCloud, your IT department scales based on your businesses' glm-rowth.

 IT Services Charleston, SC
 Computer Services Charleston, SC

IT Project Management

Peace of mind is paramount if you are a business owner who needs to build or relocate your IT setup. Fortunately, ITS' Build and Design team can move your existing IT infrastructure or relocate new IT infrastructure deployments, so that you can concentrate on serving your customers. We'll handle all the heavy lifting!
ITS helps with every aspect of your large-scale IT project, from the design and implementation of IT hardware to assistance with project budgeting. Here is a quick summary of our New Construction and Relocation computer services in Charleston, SC:

  • Onsite meetings
  • Single point of contact for all technology needs
  • Liaison between owners and vendors
  • Regular conference calls

Compliance, Security, and Audits

Companies that don't plan for or that underfund their compliance assessments will often suffer as a result. If your company is facing severe delays, incorrect scope of cardholder data environment, or even non-compliance relating to HIPAA, HITECH, or PCI DSS, ITS can help.

Our Gap Analysis and readiness audits have helped many companies achieve compliance quickly. We help you meet compliance by:

  • Uncovering all of your compliance needs
  • Providing you with a timeframe for compliance
  • Providing procedure templates and policy templates.
  • Customizing your templates.
  • Drafting your scope of assessed CDE correctly

Accurately interpreting compliance legislation is challenging, but it doesn't have to be with ITS by your side.

 Managed Services Charleston, SC
 Cloud Services Charleston, SC

Cloud Computer Services In Charleston, SC

You have probably heard of the Cloud, but did you know that moving your network, storage, and servers to a virtual platform can mean substantial cost savings, increased security, improved disaster recovery, and automatic updates?

ITS' Cloud specialists will work closely with you to develop a migration strategy so that all of your on-premises data is safely and securely transitioned to the Cloud. With our ongoing support, your journey to the Cloud will be successful and seamless.

Cybersecurity

Data theft. Malicious viruses. Ransomware attacks. Whether you own a small business or a large enterprise, cyber attacks ruin hardworking entrepreneurs every day. Cybersecurity threats are serious, and ITS is serious about protecting your business from them. With ITS' sophisticated network defense strategies, you can protect your organization, your employees, and your customers from any cybersecurity threat.

Our cybersecurity computer solutions in Charleston, SC give you:

  • Comprehensive assessments of your network, to discover and correct vulnerabilities
  • Filtering tools that restrict employees from visiting questionable websites
  • Anti-malware software that finds and blocks harmful files before they breach your system
  • Email filters to help prevent phishing attacks and spam
  • Awareness and best practices training for your entire company

ITS also regularly updates your company's antivirus software, firewalls, data breach tools, and more, so you can stress less and do what you do best - keeping your customers satisfied.

 Cybersecurity Charleston, SC
 Data Security Charleston, SC

Additional Computer Services In Charleston, SC

If you are having IT issues but don't see a solution to your problem on this page, don't fret worry. Chances are, if you need IT assistance, we can help. We offer other services like Cabling & Racking, IT Vendor Management, vCIO Solutions, IT Backup and Disaster Recovery, Microsoft 365, IT Consulting and Strategy, and even Communication & Collaboration services for employees.

Have questions? It would be our pleasure to speak with you at your convenience so that we can learn more about your business, industry, and needs.

When you call, you won't be talking to someone at a call center. You won't be talking to someone only interested in selling you a new product. You will speak to an actual ITS employee who will treat you with respect and honesty. We don't see you as a dollar sign; we see you as a person. And people always come before profits at ITS.

Latest News in Charleston, SC

Kayaking the Edisto River — South Carolina’s natural hidden treasure in the Lowcountry

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry....

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.

The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Wintering in South America, the prothonotary warbler can be found in spring and summer in the Carolinas where breeding pairs can be spotted in trees along the riverbank or deep in the swamp. Its song is a bright twee-twee-twee-twee and as it darts among the low branches above the black water of a swamp, it seems to almost demand a photo.

This spring morning, as I paddle a quiet stretch of the Edisto River, a warbler darts among the branches of a low willow hunting snails and insects. With its yellow colors flashing like a lightning bug in daytime, I am compelled to stop once again and fill the memory card on my camera with photos of tree branches in an obsession that seems to amuse the little bird. Finally, both of us are relieved as I obtain a photo or two and both of us depart satisfied from the encounter.

The subject of my photo lives with others of his kind along one of the most beautiful stretches of the Edisto River that you can ever see. The Edisto River is the longest river system contained entirely in South Carolina. Rising from Saluda and Edgefield counties, the Edisto corkscrews 250 miles along the Lowcountry to the sea and forms the “E” of the critical ACE Basin water system.

Artesian wells and crystal clear springs bubble from the limestone bedrock along the upper river and near the coast it becomes a rich, blackwater river where deep swamps open to salt marsh horizons. To spend time kayaking or boating along the Edisto is to experience a special paradise on earth.

This section of warbler-haunted Edisto described above runs approximately seven miles from Good Hope Landing to Sullivan’s Ferry near Cottageville. Good Hope Landing is a beautiful, easily accessible boat landing that allows you easy access to the river. Its 10-foot sandy bluff is crowned by a majestic live oak and the river here is wide and relatively straight.

As the current carries you along you can spot an abundance of wildlife. Egrets and herons wade in the shallows, songbirds (including prothonotary warblers) inhabit the trees and in the water, terrapin, gar and even the elusive alligator can be spotted. The river is filled with redbreast bream, catfish and bass — making this a popular as a destination for anglers.

A few miles downstream there is a narrow portion, where willows grow close and fallen trees can snag unwary boaters or those floating along in innertubes, a favorite summer pastime for hundreds of visitors every year. At four miles, you will pass Long Creek Landing, another serviceable launching location, and shortly after will pass beneath the highway bridge of U.S.-17A at the privately owned Jellico’s Landing.

Up to this point, the Edisto has been wild and scenic with few houses or other reminders of human habitation. From the bridge at Jellico’s, well-sited river houses and cottages line the river and form the community of Sullivan’s Landing. Dating from at least as far back as 1820, Sullivan’s was one of many such river crossings in the Lowcountry before bridges and modern highways took hold. The 1820 record of the South Carolina state legislature reveals that the toll for Sullivan’s Ferry was “for every two-horse carriage, 50 cents … horse and rider, 10 cents, and 5 cents for every foot passenger and head of horses, mules, cattle, sheep, goats and hogs …”

Recently, I kayaked from Good Hope to Sullivan’s Ferry with a group of friends and we found the old ferry site to be far quieter that it might have been in 1820. We enjoyed a beautiful spring day with the smooth Edisto reflecting the deep blue of a sky filled with lazy clouds. Recent rains had raised river levels and we enjoyed exploring side channels into coves of swampy flooded forest and hidden oxbow lakes.

After many hours leisurely exploring and encountering wildlife, we arrived at Sullivan’s Ferry for the journey home. We were all of the opinion that this section of the Edisto River was the most beautiful we had ever encountered — and I am certain that you will feel the same way. Should you chance to encounter a little yellow bird in a willow tree, I am certain he will share his opinion of the river, too.

Good Hope Landing and Sullivan’s Ferry Landing are both located near Cottageville and are only a little over an hour’s drive from the Beaufort area. To get there, take Interstate 95 or U.S.-17-A to Walterboro and stay on 17-A to Cottageville. In Cottageville, turn left onto Pierce Road. At 4 miles, turn right onto State Road S-15-35 to the dead end at Good Hope Landing. Sullivan’s Ferry is located at the end of Sullivan’s Ferry Road approximately 3 miles from Cottageville just off 17-A. Both landings are managed by the South Carolina DNR and are well-maintained. There are no facilities, so pack accordingly.

The river in this section is swift when the water is up but very easy to manage, despite a few areas of overhang and snags. Careful preparation and good company will ensure you have a safe, enjoyable day on the water.

For more information, visit the Edisto River Canoe and Kayak Trail site at https://ercktrail.org or obtain a detailed map at https://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/river/edisto-guide.html

New candidates file to run for Colleton County School Board

Colleton County residents who live in Districts 2, 4, and 6 have a choice to make in who will they vote onto the Colleton County School Board.These three seats – 2, 4, and 6 – are up for re-election on the school board. They mostly represent the greater parts of Walterboro.These three school board seats will be on the ballot in the upcoming November 8th election.Anyone wanting to run for these open school board has had about two weeks to file. That filing period closed at noon on Friday, August 10th.No...

Colleton County residents who live in Districts 2, 4, and 6 have a choice to make in who will they vote onto the Colleton County School Board.

These three seats – 2, 4, and 6 – are up for re-election on the school board. They mostly represent the greater parts of Walterboro.

These three school board seats will be on the ballot in the upcoming November 8th election.

Anyone wanting to run for these open school board has had about two weeks to file. That filing period closed at noon on Friday, August 10th.

Now, there are five new people and one incumbent who have chosen to run in this election.

They are: Wayne Shider, who is running for District 6; Lynn Carter Stroble, who is running for District 6; Anna Bright, who is running for District 4; Craig Stivender, who is running for District 4; incumbent William Bowman, who is running for District 4; and Daryl Erwin, who is running for District 2.

Shider and Stroble will face each other for District 6. The current District 6 school board member, Harry Jenkins, is not running again for this seat, citing health reasons.

Bright will face Stivender and current District 4 school board member William Bowman: Bowman is a longtime school board member and is also the current chairman of the school board.

Erwin has no competition for District 2. The current school board member for District 2 is Tim Mabry. However, Mabry cannot run again for this district because he no longer lives in District 2. According to Mabry, the new school board lines released earlier this year changed District 2’s geography and Mabry’s current address is outside of those new lines for District 2. Based on the new lines, Mabry now lives in District 3.

Meet the Candidates

Daryl Erwin – District 2

Daryl Erwin is running for District 2 on the Colleton County School Board.

He is a 45-year-old Walterboro native who currently works as a computer technician for the Dorchester District Four School District, in St. George. He is also the pastor of Cottageville Baptist Church. Previously, he worked in the local technology department at the Colleton County School District.

“We have to have something better for Colleton County than what we have now,” he said. “Our kids, our parents, our staff … everybody deserves better than what is happening now in our schools and within our district.”

If elected, Erwin said he wants to focus on improving staff morale. He also wants to focus on improving the work atmosphere within the district, including the district’s administrative office.

Anna Bright – District 4

Anna Bright is running for District Four on the Colleton County School Board.

Bright, 66, is a Walterboro resident and a Colleton County native. She is also a retired educator: Bright served as a school teacher more than 40 years in Colleton County and in nearby Dorchester District Four.

She came out of retirement last year, in 2021, to be a part-time teacher at the Colleton Academy for Success. This is the alternative school program for the Colleton County School District. Bright is returning this year to the alternative school, where she will teach part-time.

“Having had 40 years of experience, I feel I know what students and teachers need,” she said. “This is something I have always wanted to do. It’s a lifelong goal.”

If elected, Bright said she wants to focus on retention of teachers.

Craig Stivender – District 4

Craig Stivender is running for District 4 on the Colleton County School Board.

Stivender, 39, is a certified law enforcement officer and fireman. He is currently an arson investigator with the Walterboro Fire Department. Stivender is also a deacon and Sunday School teacher at Cottageville Baptist Church.

“Over the past few years, I have been attending the school board meetings and I don’t like the direction our district is taking on behavioral issues and the level of education that our kids are getting. I also see the issues that our leadership has,” he said.

Stivender has two children who are in the local public school system. Their third child was removed from the Colleton County School system because of their lack of satisfaction with Colleton County Middle School, he said.

“We need good people to step up to the plate and change this board. It’s time for some new ideas and new blood,” said Stivender.

William Bowman – District 4

William Bowman is currently representing District 4 on the school board. Bowman has represented District 4 on the school board since 2018. He is a local small business owner and a professional volleyball officiant and referee.

As an incumbent, Bowman said he decided to run again because he wants to continue in his original campaign promises. “I want to be a representative of all people in District 4,” he said. “I believe I’ve done that so far, and I want to continue on the promises I made in 2018 and make sure our students grow … I want to create a school system that is actually going to help our students. There is an old saying, ‘The progression of every state is in the education of its youth.’ That’s one of the reasons I chose to run for school board again, to make sure all students rise to educational proficiency.”

Bowman also said that the school board has also already made progress academically to help boost the economy and to educate the local work force. “I want to show the community that I can be a representative to all people, especially the people of District 4,” he said.

Wayne Shider – District 6

Wayne Shider is running for District 6 on the Colleton County School Board. He is a former elected member of the Colleton County School Board, and served for more than 30 years for District 6 before being defeated by current District 6 incumbent Harry Jenkins. At 62 years old, Shider is now a retired government service worker. He is also currently self-employed as a realtor and tax-repair specialist. When asked why he is running again for the school board, Shider said he wants to run again because of the “current climate” within the school district.

“With my experience, and skill set, it was time for me to seek the board again,” he said. “It’s also my strong desire to assist in the transformation of our school district, from the front lines. I don’t want to hear about this second-hand. I want to assist the district into transforming into something where student achievement goes up, where our schools are safe and to reassure the stakeholders that it’s important for us to all be a part of the decision-making in the district. We must all work together.

“All of our students should be able to move to a higher level. We also need to build trust upon the public again, having a positive relationship with everyone,” he said.

Lynn C. Stroble – District 6

Lynn Stroble is running for District 6 on the Colleton County School Board.

Stroble, 59, is a retired Colleton County school teacher and a retired administrator from the local school district. Since her retirement, she has continued to serve as a voluntarily supporting teacher for many different schools in Colleton County. She has also helped with POLARIS, a charter school in the Lowcountry. As a former teacher and administrator, Stroble says she decided to run for the Colleton County School Board because her grandchildren are going to be future students in our public schools.

“I should be able to see my grandchildren receive a positive public-school education,” she said, adding that the school board should have elected leaders on it who are educators.

“Our country should be a place where we want to see our children go to school,” she said. “Our schools should be a family, a place where we want to go to work and where we know we have a family support. “I’ve been on my knees praying a lot, and this is something I am being led to do.”

Other items that may interest you

7 places in Charleston to get your Thanksgiving meal

Thanksgiving is just a few weeks away, and the meal planning and prep may be looming over your head. But several places in town are making the day easier with pre-made meal kits and available dine-in seatings to save you from not only cooking, but cleaning, too.Did we miss something? Email pham@charlestoncitypaper.com.Cru Catering1784 Harmon St. (North Charleston)(843) 534-2433crucatering.comFamilies can choose from Cru’s...

Thanksgiving is just a few weeks away, and the meal planning and prep may be looming over your head. But several places in town are making the day easier with pre-made meal kits and available dine-in seatings to save you from not only cooking, but cleaning, too.

Did we miss something? Email pham@charlestoncitypaper.com.

Cru Catering1784 Harmon St. (North Charleston)(843) 534-2433crucatering.com

Families can choose from Cru’s Thanksgiving Kit, a build-your-own menu or a mixture of both.

Cru’s Thanksgiving Kit is $300 and includes four generous portions of these options:

Build your own meal with Cru’s a la Carte option:

Cru’s Bake Shop options include:

Deadline to order is 2 p.m. Nov. 16, with pickup Nov. 23 at either Cru Catering (1784 Harmon St.) or The Sandcastle (1 Shipwatch Rd.) from 12 to2 p.m. Email hello@crucatering.com to order.

Herd Provisions106 Grove St. (Downtown)(843) 637-4145Herdprovisions.com

Herd Provisions is offering a customized menu list:

Mains:

Sides ($8/per quart):

Desserts ($12 – serves six to eight people):

Make it a bundle with any of the following:

Deadline to order is Nov. 7.Orders can be picked up between 9 to11 a.m. Nov. 24. To order, call (843)-637-4145, email info@herdprovisions.com or fill out a form in person at Herd Provisions.

Ms. Rose’s Fine Food & Cocktails 1090 Sam Rittenberg Blvd. (West Ashley)(843) 766-0223Msroses.comMs. Rose’s Thanksgiving meal can feed up to eight people for $250.

The meal includes:

Deadline to order is Nov. 17 for a Nov. 23 pickup date. For pickups before Nov. 23, orders must be placed 72 hours in advance. No substitutions. Ms. Rose’s will be closed on Thanksgiving Day.

Table & Twine2816 Azalea Dr. (North Charleston)(843) 776-9164Tableandtwine.com

Table & Twine’s Thanksgiving package starts at $299.99 and can feed up to 10 people. The meal takes less than two hours to heat and serve.

The Thanksgiving package includes:

Order by Nov. 21 at tableandtwine.com. Pick-up and delivery available.

Charleston restaurants open for dine-in on Thanksgiving:

Church and Union Charleston32B N. Market St. (Downtown)(843) 937-8666Churchandunioncharleston.comOpen 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

Price: $70 per person, $30 for children 12 and under

Reservations are encouraged and can be made through churchandunioncharleston.com or Open Table.

Church and Union is offering a three-course meal with several options to choose from, including serrano ham, stuffing fritters, turkey dinner, chilean sea bass and more.

The Dewberry Hotel334 Meeting St. (Downtown)(843) 558-8000Thedewberrycharleston.comSeatings available at 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Price: $60 per person, $45 for children 12 and under

Reservations are required for the available seating times and can be made by emailing concierge@dewberryhotels.com.

The Dewberry is hosting a traditional Thanksgiving supper meal in the private event space, Henrietta’s. Menu to be announced.

Tempest Charleston32C N. Market St.(843) 996-4966Tempestcharleston.comOpen 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

Price: $75 per person, $30 for children 12 and under

Reservations are encouraged and available through tempestcharleston.com or Open Table.

Tempest is offering a three-course meal with several options to choose from like braised beet salad, sweet potato bisque, confit swordfish, prime NY strip and more.

Check back for more additions to this list as the holiday approaches.

Stay cool. Support City Paper.

City Paper has been bringing the best news, food, arts, music and event coverage to the Holy City since 1997. Support our continued efforts to highlight the best of Charleston with a one-time donation or become a member of the City Paper Club.

Charleston’s 2 biggest tech firms surprise investors, 1 more than the other

The two Nasdaq-listed software companies that have called Daniel Island home for years unwrapped a couple of surprises for their investors last week.Benefitfocus was first to come bearing gifts. The long-struggling company announced Monday that it agreed to be sold for $10.50 a share in an all-cash deal valued at $570 million.Next up was Blackbaud Inc., the larger, older and more financially stout of the neighboring technology employers. The company disclosed to analysts and anyone else who tuned into its quarterly webcast Wedn...

The two Nasdaq-listed software companies that have called Daniel Island home for years unwrapped a couple of surprises for their investors last week.

Benefitfocus was first to come bearing gifts. The long-struggling company announced Monday that it agreed to be sold for $10.50 a share in an all-cash deal valued at $570 million.

Next up was Blackbaud Inc., the larger, older and more financially stout of the neighboring technology employers. The company disclosed to analysts and anyone else who tuned into its quarterly webcast Wednesday morning that it recently eliminated more jobs and has stopped filling open positions under a newly stated goal to lower its overhead by as much as $50 million.

The Benefitfocus sale wasn’t unexpected, given the company’s profitability challenges.

Blackbaud’s eight-figure cost-cutting announcement — and a suggestion that there’s more on the horizon — was.

In its earnings summary, the Fairchild Street company didn’t specifically mention layoffs or hiring freezes. It only said it now anticipates “meeting or exceeding our 2022 financial guidance” based on “a combination of actions taken and initiatives in place that are well within our control to manage and execute.”

Blackbaud CEO Mike Gianoni volunteered some details during his opening webcast remarks.

“We’ve taken several prudent steps this year to better align our workforce to strategic priorities, including the elimination of open positions as well as the difficult decision to reduce our workforce last week,” he said.

Gianoni projected that the moves will “add several points of margin improvement on a go-forward basis.”

Round 2

It is the second round of workforce reductions this year at Blackbaud, a 41-year-old Charleston tech-industry pioneer that sells fund-raising software and analytical services to nonprofit organizations around the world. The first was announced in August, when the company cited the slowdown in the global economy.

Blackbaud declined to specify exactly how many positions have been eliminated this year, but it characterized the figure as a “small percentage” of its payroll. The company had about 3,600 employees worldwide as of Dec. 31, according its 2021 annual report, and most of them now work remotely. The projected severance costs for the year will fall between $6 million and $8 million.

The cost savings are expected to start showing up in the fourth-quarter financial results when they’re released early next year.

“And we’ve already completed those cost reductions,” said Gianoni, whose employment contract was recently extended through 2025.

The headcount cuts didn’t go unnoticed. Parker Lane, a Stifel financial analyst who follows Blackbaud, kicked off last week’s question-and-answer session by asking which parts of the business were affected the most.

“Not one area in particular, actually,” Gianoni responded. “We had both workforce reductions and elimination on some future open positions as well. So, we’re just remaining conservative on the cost side of the business, but no one particular area stood out on that list.”

The payroll parings coincide with labor cutbacks other tech firms have announced recently, including Amazon, Lyft and Twitter.

Blackbaud disclosed its most recent cuts a day after its latest financial report showed that its expenses are up 29 percent this year to $426 million while sales have climbed by about half that amount to $783 million. The gap widened in the July-September quarter, which included a net loss of $10.3 million.

Margin call

At the same time, the company is moving more aggressively to comply with the “Rule of 40,” a software-specific yardstick that calls for a firm’s sales growth rate and profit margin to equal or exceed 40 percent. Blackbaud has reached the 28 percent mark, leaving some heavy lifting to do.

In discussing the “Rule of 40,’” finance chief Tony Boor told analysts that management has “a very good line of sight” about its ability to improve a key profit-margin measurement next year “given the recent reduction in our workforce and the elimination of open positions.”

“We expect the cost actions we’ve already taken and those under way will reduce our planned future cost run-rate by approximately $40 million to $50 million, with some offsets to fund investments in areas like cyber security and innovation,” he said.

Boor also suggested Blackbaud isn’t finished reining in expenses.

“And we see further opportunity in 2023 and beyond to scale our infrastructure costs, reduce overhead and execute pricing initiatives, with much of that upside falling through to margin,” he said.

Asked afterward whether its “Rule of 40” goal was the driving force behind the cuts, Blackbaud said it’s taken several actions this year “to better align our workforce to strategic priorities and to minimize the impact of the current and projected economic environment. This will ensure we continue to meet our customers’ needs not just today, but for the long term.”

It also said that the cost-reduction plans “include the elimination of open roles and contractors, as well as the workforce reduction, but labor is not the only factor.” It did not elaborate.

The expense cutting also followed the disclosure that Clearlake Capital Group has nearly doubled its ownership stake at Blackbaud this year to more than 18 percent.

Last month, the California-based hedge fund announced that it switched its investor status, from passive to active. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the firm’s managing partners said they had “changed their intent” and are “currently evaluating alternatives for their current investment and potential future investment.”

In response, Blackbaud adopted a stockholder rights plan to defend itself against the possibility of a hostile takeover. The so-called poison pill remains in effect until next October.

Whether Clearlake’s new posturing influenced the cost-cutting moves on Daniel Island is unclear. Blackbaud didn’t answer the question directly. It said the decisions it has made this year “align to our long-term growth strategy. As we continue to balance our operating disciplines to drive sustainable growth, we have aligned our workforce to strategic priorities to operate most efficiently.”

Wall Street apparently liked what it heard on the webcast. Shares of Blackbaud rose more than 4 percent in the days after the discussion to end the week at $57.35.

Celebrated Lowcountry soul food restaurant to close after 11 years in the Charleston area

It’s the end of an era for those who have frequented Nana’s Seafood & Soul and Nana’s Uptown in the last 11 years.Nana’s Uptown at 5117 Dorchester Road will permanently close Nov. 20, two and a half years after the downtown Charleston original shuttered.The restaurant made the announcement on social media.Nana’s Uptown is cl...

It’s the end of an era for those who have frequented Nana’s Seafood & Soul and Nana’s Uptown in the last 11 years.

Nana’s Uptown at 5117 Dorchester Road will permanently close Nov. 20, two and a half years after the downtown Charleston original shuttered.

The restaurant made the announcement on social media.

Nana’s Uptown is closing in part because of the current state of the economy and rising cost of food, Kenyatta McNeil, who owns Nana’s with his mother Carolyn, told The Post and Courier.

“Running a restaurant is hard,” McNeil said. “A lot of people get in and don’t understand (the) sacrifice and dedication.”

The original Nana’s opened at 176 Line St. in 2011, serving a full range of fried seafood, as well as beloved Lowcountry treats such as chilly bears and chewies. During its run, it received press attention from outlets including The A.V. Club, The Wall Street Journal, Garden & Gun and Roads & Kingdoms. Among the celebrities who dined there were Andrew Zimmern and Waka Flocka Flame.

Nana’s Uptown opened as a takeout-only restaurant in July 2019, nine months before the original closed.

Moving forward, McNeill will continue his work as a longshoreman on a more full-time basis. The desire for a lifestyle change was another main factor contributing to the closure, though McNeill and his mom will still operate the Nana’s Seafood & Soul food trailer.

While closing the restaurant is bittersweet, McNeil said he appreciates the support over the years, particularly the local North Charleston community that kept Nana’s Uptown busy.

“From the beginning, we didn’t expect to be received how we have been,” McNeil said. “From different TV shows, different magazines, just being a center of attention when it comes to Lowcountry food. We’re proud of what we’ve done and we have to thank our supporters and those that actually helped us get into the situation we’ve been in.”

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.